36 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. Large societies need other enforcement mechanisms: government, religion, written codes.

      Larger groups, such as societies, use other mechanisms to enforce norms, such as: government, religion, written codes.

  2. Oct 2020
  3. Aug 2020
    1. What if, as in the case of anonymous résumés, the DA had no clue about the race of the accused? For that matter, what if you also removed identifying information on the victim and even the location of the crime? In 2019, the San Francisco DA’s office began anonymous charging, removing potentially biasing information from crime reports DAs use to decide whether or not to bring charges (http://bkaprt.com/dcb/02-30/). It’s too soon to tell the outcome of that experiment but, again, the removal of a decisive element may enhance an experience rather than detract from it.

      Another way to potentially approach this is to take the biasing information and reduce the charging by statistical means to negate the biased effects?

      Separately, how can this be done at the street level to allow policing resources to find and prosecute white collar criminals who may be having a more profoundly deleterious effect on society?

  4. Jul 2020
  5. Jun 2020
    1. EFF describes this as “a major threat,” warning that “the privacy and security of all users will suffer if U.S. law enforcement achieves its dream of breaking encryption.”
    2. Once the platforms introduce backdoors, those arguing against such a move say, bad guys will inevitably steal the keys. Lawmakers have been clever. No mention of backdoors at all in the proposed legislation or the need to break encryption. If you transmit illegal or dangerous content, they argue, you will be held responsible. You decide how to do that. Clearly there are no options to some form of backdoor.
    3. While this debate has been raging for a year, the current “EARN-IT’ bill working its way through the U.S. legislative process is the biggest test yet for the survival of end-to-end encryption in its current form. In short, this would enforce best practices on the industry to “prevent, reduce and respond to” illicit material. There is no way they can do that without breaking their own encryption. QED.
    4. Governments led by the U.S., U.K. and Australia are battling the industry to open up “warrant-proof” encryption to law enforcement agencies. The industry argues this will weaken security for all users around the world. The debate has polarized opinion and is intensifying.
    1. Such is the security of this architecture, that it has prompted law enforcement agencies around the world to complain that they now cannot access a user’s messages, even with a warrant. There is no backdoor—the only option is to compromise one of the endpoints and access messages in their decrypted state.
  6. May 2020
  7. Apr 2020
    1. I still feel like unless there is a very significant increase in staffing, they are probably going to have to pick and choose the enforcement actions that they bring,
    2. The data protection authorities have other tools as well, which might be even costlier than fines, Kagan said.In some cases, EU regulators can tell companies, “You have 90 days to rectify the thing you are doing wrong with the data, or after 90 days you cannot use the data.” Sometimes, even the big fines won’t make or break them, but the data will if it is a core component of their business.
    1. Having said all that, I think this is completely absurd that I have to write an entire article justifying the release of this data out of fear of prosecution or legal harassment. I had wanted to write an article about the data itself but I will have to do that later because I had to write this lame thing trying to convince the FBI not to raid me.
    2. I could have released this data anonymously like everyone else does but why should I have to? I clearly have no criminal intent here. It is beyond all reason that any researcher, student, or journalist have to be afraid of law enforcement agencies that are supposed to be protecting us instead of trying to find ways to use the laws against us.
  8. Mar 2020
  9. Oct 2019
  10. publications.parliament.uk publications.parliament.uk
    1. applying the principlesapplicable on an application for judicial review

      Scope is limited by JR

  11. Apr 2019
    1. Washington state Attorney General Bob Ferguson said Thursday that Motel 6 shared the information of about 80,000 guests in the state from 2015 to 2017. That led to targeted investigations of guests with Latino-sounding names, according to Ferguson. He said many guests faced questioning from ICE, detainment or deportation as a result of the disclosures. It's the second settlement over the company's practice in recent months.

      If you stay at Motel 6, prepare to have your latino-tinged data handed over to the authorities who are looking to harm you permanently.

  12. Jan 2019
    1. nforcement(1) The OEP may make a review application in relation to conduct described in adecision notice given to a public authority as a failure of the authority tocomply with environmental law.(2) The OEP may make a review application in relation to conduct of a publicauthority occurring after a decision notice was given to the authority that issimilar, or is related, to conduct that was described in the notice as a failure ofthe authority to comply with environmental law.(3) In this Act, a “review application” means—(a) in England and Wales or Northern Ireland, an application to the HighCourt for judicial review, or(b) in Scotland, an application to the supervisory jurisdiction of the Courtof Session.(4) Neither subsection (1) nor (2) overrides any requirement for permission of thecourt to be obtained before making a review application

      The JR bit

  13. Oct 2018
  14. Mar 2018
  15. Sep 2016
    1. The Swedish school system has wholeheartedly, and probably too quickly and eagerly, embraced this new agenda. Last fall, 200 teachers attended a major government-sponsored conference discussing how to avoid "traditional gender patterns" in schools. At Egalia, one model Stockholm preschool, everything from the decoration to the books and toys are carefully selected to promote a gender-equal perspective and to avoid traditional presentations of gender and parenting roles

      Swedish school system has enforced use of hen

  16. Oct 2015
  17. Jan 2014
    1. One respondent noted that NSF doesn't have an enforcement policy. This is presumably true of other mandate sources as well, and brings up the related and perhaps more significant problem that mandates are not always (if they are ever) accompanied by the funding required to satisfy them. Another respondent wrote that funding agencies expect universities to contribute to long-term data storage.
    1. This is the contradiction of the Google Bus, and it’s one that should resonate across the country. The Google Bus is the embodiment of a system that indemnifies the actions of corporations while increasingly criminalizing and punishing individuals. Google and its ilk have always known that they could break the law right up until the day they were invited to make new laws. That is the power of corporate wealth, and in San Francisco as in the rest of the country, it rules supreme.