88 Matching Annotations
  1. Jul 2022
    1. 1. Focus on items that occur with high frequency in the language as awhole (see Table 3.1 for examples). Such items will occur often inmany different texts.2. Focus on strategies that can be used with most texts (see Table 3.1for examples).

      .c1

  2. Jun 2022
    1. The old rule, now practically an adage, “Post once, reply twice” is essentially the epitaph for online learning.

      This sounds godawful and unproductive.

    1. One of my favorite rules of thumb is to “Only start projects that are already 80percent done.” That might seem like a paradox, but committing to finishprojects only when I’ve already done most of the work to capture, organize,and distill the relevant material means I never run the risk of startingsomething I can’t finish.

      This same sort of principle is seen in philanthropy circles where the group already has commitments for a large proportion of the end goal before they even announce the campaign.

      Is there a rule of thumb for this in philanthropy? 50%? What is it called, ie does it have a specific name?

      What relation does it have to the Pareto principle, if any?

  3. May 2022
    1. But there are three golden rules at Lunch with the FT: the FT pays, no PRs and no quote-checking.

      Golden rules

  4. Apr 2022
    1. It shouldn't escape the mnemonists' attention that while Wozniak recognizes some basic attributes of memory and mnemonics, he obviously isn't steeped in the traditions of the art of memory. Specifically he doesn't seem to be aware of associative methods beyond peg systems and some low level basics which he's come across via Tony Buzan. He's also missing the major system and the method of loci in general. However, when looking at his list of "Twenty rules of formulating knowledge", the majority of the items on the list are either heavily informed by the memory canon within classical rhetoric. Some of the items on the list actually move in an opposite direction from good memory principles (his admonitions against sets and enumeration), but it's because Wozniak is explicitly missing some of the basic mnemotechnical tools.

      Have any writers on space repetition gone beyond Wozniak's state of the art with respect to mnemotechniques before?

      I had started it and lost it due to a technical glitch, but it might be worth highlighting the places where Wozniak's list either directly dovetails or diverges from the arts of memory. His list could be dramatically improved and compressed by brining it closer in line with the fourth canon of rhetoric.

  5. Mar 2022
  6. Jan 2022
    1. Hi, it seems as though you have multiple questions: you should separate these into multiple posts.

      A multi-question post would be perfectly appropriate in a forum or mailing list. Seems a bit too strict to not allow something like this, where one has multiple related questions.

    1. The server generating a 401 response MUST send a WWW-Authenticate header field (Section 4.1) containing at least one challenge applicable to the target resource.

      Meaning that 99% of the people use it are using it "wrong" because they're not using it for HTTP authentication and don't send a WWW-Authenticate header field with their 401 response?

      Hmm. That's a tough one. On the one hand, the spec does say they must send it.

      Initial opinion

      But on the other hand, one could argue that that requirement only applies if using 401 for HTTP authentication. And that saying it's wrong to do so (as they claim at https://stackoverflow.com/questions/3297048/403-forbidden-vs-401-unauthorized-http-responses/14713094#14713094 and https://hyp.is/JA45zHotEeybDdM_In4frQ/stackoverflow.com/questions/3297048/403-forbidden-vs-401-unauthorized-http-responses) is having a too strict/narrow/literal interpretation.

      HTTP is meant to be used widely in many very different uses and contexts, most of which do not use this very specific HTTP authentication scheme; my opinion is that they shouldn't be denied from using it, just because they don't have anything useful WWW-Authenticate header field. (Or (which is also fine with me), just put something "emptyish" in the field, like "Unused". Unless that would trigger a Basic auth modal in the browser, in which case we shouldn't, for practical reasons.)

      Why shouldn't we be able to repurpose this same status code for uses that are still authentication, but just not HTTP authentication per se?

      Is it really wrong to repurpose this useful status code for other contexts, like cookie-based app-defined authentication systems?

      I say that it's okay to repurpose/reuse 401 for any authentication system (that uses HTTP as a part of it, even though not using HTTP's own authentication system), as long as we try to maintain the same semantic as originally intended/described here. I think it's okay to use 401 as a response to a XHR request, and then have the client redirect to a login page, which provides a way to authenticate again (reattempt the authentication challenge), analogous to how it works for HTTP authentication.

      Revised opinion

      https://stackoverflow.com/questions/3297048/403-forbidden-vs-401-unauthorized-http-responses/14713094#14713094 has made me change my mind and convinced me that...

      Authentication by schemes outside of (not defined by) RFC7235: Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP/1.1): Authentication should not use HTTP status 401, because 401 Unauthorized is only defined (by current RFCs) by RFC7235: Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP/1.1): Authentication, and has semantics and requirements (such as the requirement that "A server generating a 401 (Unauthorized) response MUST send a WWW-Authenticate header field containing at least one challenge.") that simply don't make sense or cannot be fulfilled if using a non-HTTP authentication scheme.

      403 Forbidden, on the other hand, is defined by the broader HTTP standard, in RFC7231: Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP/1.1): Semantics and Content and RFC7235: Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP/1.1): Authentication.

      In conclusion, if you have your own roll-your-own login process and never use HTTP Authentication, 403 is always the proper response and 401 should never be used.

      Couldn't a custom auth system use WWW-Authenticate header?

      The question was asked:

      Doesn't RFC7235 provide for "roll-your-own" or alternate auth challenges? Why can't my app's login flow present its challenge in the form of a WWW-Authenticate header? Even if a browser doesn't support it, my React app can...

      And I would say sure, if you want (and if the browser doesn't automatically show a Basic auth modal in this case and thwart your plans).

      They might be on to something here with that question!

      But that should probably be the test of whether you can/should use 401: are you actually using WWW-Authenticate header?

      Indeed I found an example where it is used for OAuth2.

  7. Nov 2021
    1. One of the people I spoke with was asked to apologize for an offense that broke no existing rules. “I said, ‘What am I apologizing for?’ And they said, ‘Well, their feelings were hurt.’ So I crafted my apology around that: ‘If I did say something that upset you, I didn’t anticipate that would happen.’ ” The apology was initially accepted, but his problems didn’t end.

      Even in cases where one apologizes for offences which don't break existing rules and the apology is accepted by the transgressed, the social ostracism doesn't end. This is a part of the indeterminate length of the social sentences that transgressors suffer.


      What exactly are these unwritten rules? In some cases they may be examples of institutional power wielding influence in cases where people aren't giving the full benefit of humanity and consideration to others. Some may call some of these instances microaggressions or social constructs similar to them.

  8. Aug 2021
    1. The above works great. However, the problem comes when I want to use literal types for my legal values. In my code, I want to do that so I can make sure I define a "handler" for every legal value: const legalValues = <const>["a", "b", "c"]; // later on... // Because legalValues entries are literal types, // I get a compiler error if I forget to define any behaviors const behaviors: { [K in typeof legalValues[number]]: any } = { a: something, b: somethingElse, c: anotherThing };
  9. Jun 2021
    1. Giving peers permission to engage in dialogue about race and holding a lofty expectation that they will stay engaged in these conversations throughout the semester or year is the first of the four agreements for courageous conversation. While initially, some participants may be eager to enter into these conversations, our experience indicates that the more personal and thus risky these topics get, the more difficult it is for participants to stay committed and engaged." Singleton and Hays

  10. May 2021
  11. Apr 2021
  12. Mar 2021
    1. Mutually exclusive categories can be beneficial. If categories appear several places, it's called cross-listing or polyhierarchical. The hierarchy will lose its value if cross-listing appears too often. Cross-listing often appears when working with ambiguous categories that fits more than one place.
  13. en.wikipedia.org en.wikipedia.org
    1. RPython puts some constraints on the Python language such that a variable's type can be inferred at compile time.
    1. This thread is more than 5 months old. It is very likely that it does not need any further discussion and thus bumping it serves no purpose. If you feel it is necessary to make a new reply, you can still do so though. I am aware that this thread is rather old but I still want to make a reply.
    2. "You will not argue with, comment on or question the actions/authority/ or comments of the Paradox staff (Administrators, Moderators, etc.) in a public forum. Should you wish to do so you are directed to contact the Paradox staff via PM"

      do not question us publicly?

  14. Feb 2021
  15. Jan 2021
    1. Group Rules from the Admins1NO POSTING LINKS INSIDE OF POST - FOR ANY REASONWe've seen way too many groups become a glorified classified ad & members don't like that. We don't want the quality of our group negatively impacted because of endless links everywhere. NO LINKS2NO POST FROM FAN PAGES / ARTICLES / VIDEO LINKSOur mission is to cultivate the highest quality content inside the group. If we allowed videos, fan page shares, & outside websites, our group would turn into spam fest. Original written content only3NO SELF PROMOTION, RECRUITING, OR DM SPAMMINGMembers love our group because it's SAFE. We are very strict on banning members who blatantly self promote their product or services in the group OR secretly private message members to recruit them.4NO POSTING OR UPLOADING VIDEOS OF ANY KINDTo protect the quality of our group & prevent members from being solicited products & services - we don't allow any videos because we can't monitor what's being said word for word. Written post only.

      Wow, that's strict.

    1. JOINING RULE: If x and y are theorems, then < x∧y> is a theorem. SEPARATION RULE: If < x∧y> is a theorem, then both x and y are theorems. DOUBLE-TILDE RULE: The string '~~' can be deleted from any theorem can also be inserted into any theorem, provided that the result string is itself well-formed. FANTASY RULE: If y can be derived when x is assumed to be a theorem then < x⊃y> is a theorem. CARRY-OVER RULE: Inside a fantasy, any theorem from the "reality" c level higher can be brought in and used. RULE OF DETACHMENT: If x and < x⊃y> are both theorems, then y is a theorem. CONTRAPOSITIVE RULE: <x⊃y> and <~y⊃~x> are interchangeable DE MORGAN'S RULE: <~x∧~y> and ~< x∨y> are interchangeable. SWITCHEROO RULE: <x∨y> and <~x⊃y> are interchangeable
  16. Dec 2020
  17. Nov 2020
    1. Facebook makes choices about what content is acceptable on its site. Those choices are controversial, implemented by thousands of low-paid workers quickly implementing unclear rules. These are tremendously hard problems without clear solutions. Even obvious rules like banning hateful words run into challenges when people try to legitimately discuss certain important topics.

      How Facebook decides what to censor.

  18. Oct 2020
    1. Please don't copy answers to multiple questions; this is the same as your answer to a similar question

      Why on earth not? There's nothing wrong with reusing the same answer if it can work for multiple questions. That's called being efficient. It would be stupid to write a new answer from scratch when you already have one that can work very well and fits the question very well.

    1. Final Form makes the assumption that your validation functions are "pure" or "idempotent", i.e. will always return the same result when given the same values. This is why it doesn't run the synchronous validation again (just to double check) before allowing the submission: because it's already stored the results of the last time it ran it.
  19. Sep 2020
    1. I think this is being rejected on grounds that are too arbitrary, and detract from what to me are the best things about Svelte -- it's fun and easy to use, and lets you write components in a way that's natural and expressive.
    1. we need to step back and make a closer look at the DRY principle. As I mentioned earlier, it stands for "Don’t Repeat Yourself" and requires that any piece of domain knowledge has a single representation in your code base. The words domain knowledge are key here. DRY is not about duplicating code. It is specifically about duplicating domain knowledge

      This is actually a good point – to have a single representation of specific piece of domain knowledge in the code.

      DRY is not about duplicating code.

  20. Aug 2020
    1. Harper, Craig A., and Darren Rhodes. ‘Ideological Responses to the Breaking of COVID-19 Social Distancing Recommendations’, 19 August 2020. https://doi.org/10.31234/osf.io/dkqj6.

    2. Harper, Craig A., and Darren Rhodes. ‘Ideological Responses to the Breaking of COVID-19 Social Distancing Recommendations’, 19 August 2020. https://doi.org/10.31234/osf.io/dkqj6.

    3. Harper, Craig A., and Darren Rhodes. ‘Ideological Responses to the Breaking of COVID-19 Social Distancing Recommendations’, 19 August 2020. https://doi.org/10.31234/osf.io/dkqj6.

  21. Jul 2020
    1. It's possible for a document to match more than one match statement. In the case where multiple allow expressions match a request, the access is allowed if any of the conditions is true

      overlapping match statements

    2. If you want rules to apply to an arbitrarily deep hierarchy, use the recursive wildcard syntax, {name=**}
    3. Security rules apply only at the matched path, so the access controls defined on the cities collection do not apply to the landmarks subcollection. Instead, write explicit rules to control access to subcollections
    1. only the @firebase/testing Node.js module supports mocking auth in Security Rules, making unit tests much easier
  22. Jun 2020
  23. May 2020
  24. Nov 2019
    1. Injector components should never be self-closing, and they should never wrap multiple children. We can fix this at code-time and not wait for the errors at runtime.
    2. This naming convention helps developers understand the component’s contract
  25. May 2019
    1. sociology as the scientific study of a reality sui generis

      Yeah, Durkheim just got harder on social reality!

  26. Apr 2019
    1. AMP is a set of rules that publishers (typically news and analysis content providers) must abide by in order to appear in the “Top Stories” section of Google’s search results, a lucrative position at the top of the page.

      This is just one of many reasons for not using Google's search engine. Or most of their products.

      Monotheistic and, more importantly, monopolistic thinking like this drags us all down.

  27. Mar 2019
    1. Shneiderman's eight golden rules of interface design This is a simple page that lists and briefly explains the eight golden rules of interface design. The rules are quite useful when designing interfaces and the explanation provided here is sufficient to enable the visitor to use the principles. Rating 5/5

  28. Feb 2019
    1. practical sciences, experience; nor are they anything but general observations, concerning whathas been universally found to please in all coun­tries and in all ages.

      Rules, then, are not prescribed by some Truth but are those "universally found to please," to have the most consensus.

    2. rigid adherence to rules does not guarantee favorable response and that deviating from rules often produces wonderful results

      I don't know about anyone else, but part of my personal pedagogical imperative is teaching the 'rules' just so students know how and when to break them well. "Look. Here's what's expected. Now that we're on the same page, let's burn it, shall we?"

  29. Nov 2018
    1. “This has all been an economic move,” she says. “People sort of forget that, I think. It was discovered by some of the HMOs on the West Coast, and it was really not the HMOs, it was the medical groups that were taking risks—economic risks for their group of patients—that figured out if they sent … primary-care people to the hospital and they assigned them on a rotation of a week at a time, that they can bring down the LOS in the hospital. “That meant more money in their own pockets because the medical group was taking the risk.” Once hospitalists set up practice in a hospital, C-suite administrators quickly saw them gaining patient share and began realizing that they could be partners. “They woke up one day, and just like that, they pay attention to how many cases the orthopedist does,” she says. “[They said], ‘Oh, Dr. Smith did 10 cases last week, he did 10 cases this week, then he did no cases or he did two cases. … They started to come to the hospitalists and say, ‘Look, you’re controlling X% of my patients a day. We’re having a length of stay problem; we’re having an early-discharge problem.’ Whatever it was, they were looking for partners to try to solve these issues.” And when hospitalists grew in number again as the model continued to take hold and blossom as an effective care-delivery method, hospitalists again were turned to as partners. “Once you get to that point, that you’re seeing enough patients and you’re enough of a movement,” Dr. Gorman says, “you get asked to be on the pharmacy committee and this committee, and chairman of the medical staff, and all those sort of things, and those evolve over time.”
    2. 2003 amid the push for quality and safety. And while the specialty’s early adoption of those initiatives clearly was a major reason for the exponential growth of hospitalists, Dr. Gorman doesn’t want people to forget that the cost of care was what motivated community facilities.
  30. Oct 2018
    1. Learning in higher education is governed by rules though, however arbitrary and make-believe those rules may be.

      LOL make-believe rules of higher education.

  31. Feb 2018
  32. Jan 2018
  33. Nov 2017
  34. Oct 2017
    1. We certainly don't follow the Latin-based, old-fashioned advice that forbids splittingan infinitive verb 'to boldly go' or, ending a sentence with a preposition (‘I have nobodyto go with’). These rules were based on the fact that allLatin infinitives are expressed as one word. Also, that Latin prepositions are always placedbefore the noun, so can never appear at the end of a Latin sentenc

      Latin based rules that don't apply to English now. 1- Don't split infinitives 2- Don't end a sentence with a preposition

      There are more

    2. There are lots of other rules such as not starting a sentence with ‘and’, or ‘but’,or ‘because’ that you might remember from school, but these are what some grammarianscall ‘bogus’ or ‘zombie’ rules.

      Bogus/Zombie rules like:

      Don't start sentences with and, but or because

  35. Feb 2017
  36. Jan 2017
    1. clear

      Her ideas that "nature is the best teacher of eloquence" and rules only help a little is tricky. It seems that Astell is proclaiming that there are natural characteristics which make women effective rhetorically, but women must also follow rules in order to adhere to their nature and speak eloquently?

    1. noting that rigid adherence to rules does not guarantee favorable re-sponse and that deviating from rules often produces wonderful results.

      "It is an old observation, that the best writers sometimes disregard the rules of rhetoric. When they do so, however, the reader will usually find in the sentence some compensating merit, attained at the cost of the violation. Unless he is certain of doing as well, he will probably do best to follow the rules."

      William Strunk (The Elements of Style, Introduction)

  37. Nov 2015
    1. Thus,any of these occurrences can ramify acrosseach other, affecting and being affected inways that exceed whatever infrastructure isavailable

      Is this to say we need even more structure than what is already in place? Or will the things being contained eventually escape from that rule also?

  38. Jul 2015
    1. Sec. 15-7. - Injuring or defacing library property. Whoever willfully injures or defaces any book, newspaper, magazine, pamphlet, manuscript, or other property belonging to the city library by writing, marking, tearing, breaking, or otherwise mutilating shall be fined as provided in section 1-8. (Code 1964, amended, § 19.19(A)) Cross reference— Damage to public property, § 17-26. State Law reference— Criminal mischief, V.A.P.C. § 28.03; reckless damage of property, § 28.04.
  39. Oct 2013
    1. BY speakers, as well as writers, there are certain rules to be observed. Language is based on reason, antiquity, authority, custom. It is analogy, and sometimes etymology, that affords the chief support to reason. A certain majesty, and, if I may so express myself, religion, graces the antique.
    1. Quintilian does not give rules from which there is no departure;

      Rules made to be broken