51 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. Please don't copy answers to multiple questions; this is the same as your answer to a similar question

      Why on earth not? There's nothing wrong with reusing the same answer if it can work for multiple questions. That's called being efficient. It would be stupid to write a new answer from scratch when you already have one that can work very well and fits the question very well.

    1. Final Form makes the assumption that your validation functions are "pure" or "idempotent", i.e. will always return the same result when given the same values. This is why it doesn't run the synchronous validation again (just to double check) before allowing the submission: because it's already stored the results of the last time it ran it.
  2. Oct 2020
  3. Sep 2020
    1. I think this is being rejected on grounds that are too arbitrary, and detract from what to me are the best things about Svelte -- it's fun and easy to use, and lets you write components in a way that's natural and expressive.
    1. we need to step back and make a closer look at the DRY principle. As I mentioned earlier, it stands for "Don’t Repeat Yourself" and requires that any piece of domain knowledge has a single representation in your code base. The words domain knowledge are key here. DRY is not about duplicating code. It is specifically about duplicating domain knowledge

      This is actually a good point – to have a single representation of specific piece of domain knowledge in the code.

      DRY is not about duplicating code.

  4. Aug 2020
    1. Harper, Craig A., and Darren Rhodes. ‘Ideological Responses to the Breaking of COVID-19 Social Distancing Recommendations’, 19 August 2020. https://doi.org/10.31234/osf.io/dkqj6.

    2. Harper, Craig A., and Darren Rhodes. ‘Ideological Responses to the Breaking of COVID-19 Social Distancing Recommendations’, 19 August 2020. https://doi.org/10.31234/osf.io/dkqj6.

    3. Harper, Craig A., and Darren Rhodes. ‘Ideological Responses to the Breaking of COVID-19 Social Distancing Recommendations’, 19 August 2020. https://doi.org/10.31234/osf.io/dkqj6.

  5. Jul 2020
    1. It's possible for a document to match more than one match statement. In the case where multiple allow expressions match a request, the access is allowed if any of the conditions is true

      overlapping match statements

    2. If you want rules to apply to an arbitrarily deep hierarchy, use the recursive wildcard syntax, {name=**}
    3. Security rules apply only at the matched path, so the access controls defined on the cities collection do not apply to the landmarks subcollection. Instead, write explicit rules to control access to subcollections
    1. only the @firebase/testing Node.js module supports mocking auth in Security Rules, making unit tests much easier
  6. Jun 2020
  7. May 2020
  8. Nov 2019
    1. Injector components should never be self-closing, and they should never wrap multiple children. We can fix this at code-time and not wait for the errors at runtime.
    2. This naming convention helps developers understand the component’s contract
  9. May 2019
    1. sociology as the scientific study of a reality sui generis

      Yeah, Durkheim just got harder on social reality!

  10. Apr 2019
    1. AMP is a set of rules that publishers (typically news and analysis content providers) must abide by in order to appear in the “Top Stories” section of Google’s search results, a lucrative position at the top of the page.

      This is just one of many reasons for not using Google's search engine. Or most of their products.

      Monotheistic and, more importantly, monopolistic thinking like this drags us all down.

  11. Mar 2019
    1. Shneiderman's eight golden rules of interface design This is a simple page that lists and briefly explains the eight golden rules of interface design. The rules are quite useful when designing interfaces and the explanation provided here is sufficient to enable the visitor to use the principles. Rating 5/5

  12. Feb 2019
    1. practical sciences, experience; nor are they anything but general observations, concerning whathas been universally found to please in all coun­tries and in all ages.

      Rules, then, are not prescribed by some Truth but are those "universally found to please," to have the most consensus.

    2. rigid adherence to rules does not guarantee favorable response and that deviating from rules often produces wonderful results

      I don't know about anyone else, but part of my personal pedagogical imperative is teaching the 'rules' just so students know how and when to break them well. "Look. Here's what's expected. Now that we're on the same page, let's burn it, shall we?"

  13. Nov 2018
    1. “This has all been an economic move,” she says. “People sort of forget that, I think. It was discovered by some of the HMOs on the West Coast, and it was really not the HMOs, it was the medical groups that were taking risks—economic risks for their group of patients—that figured out if they sent … primary-care people to the hospital and they assigned them on a rotation of a week at a time, that they can bring down the LOS in the hospital. “That meant more money in their own pockets because the medical group was taking the risk.” Once hospitalists set up practice in a hospital, C-suite administrators quickly saw them gaining patient share and began realizing that they could be partners. “They woke up one day, and just like that, they pay attention to how many cases the orthopedist does,” she says. “[They said], ‘Oh, Dr. Smith did 10 cases last week, he did 10 cases this week, then he did no cases or he did two cases. … They started to come to the hospitalists and say, ‘Look, you’re controlling X% of my patients a day. We’re having a length of stay problem; we’re having an early-discharge problem.’ Whatever it was, they were looking for partners to try to solve these issues.” And when hospitalists grew in number again as the model continued to take hold and blossom as an effective care-delivery method, hospitalists again were turned to as partners. “Once you get to that point, that you’re seeing enough patients and you’re enough of a movement,” Dr. Gorman says, “you get asked to be on the pharmacy committee and this committee, and chairman of the medical staff, and all those sort of things, and those evolve over time.”
    2. 2003 amid the push for quality and safety. And while the specialty’s early adoption of those initiatives clearly was a major reason for the exponential growth of hospitalists, Dr. Gorman doesn’t want people to forget that the cost of care was what motivated community facilities.
  14. Oct 2018
    1. Learning in higher education is governed by rules though, however arbitrary and make-believe those rules may be.

      LOL make-believe rules of higher education.

  15. Feb 2018
  16. Jan 2018
  17. Nov 2017
  18. Oct 2017
    1. We certainly don't follow the Latin-based, old-fashioned advice that forbids splittingan infinitive verb 'to boldly go' or, ending a sentence with a preposition (‘I have nobodyto go with’). These rules were based on the fact that allLatin infinitives are expressed as one word. Also, that Latin prepositions are always placedbefore the noun, so can never appear at the end of a Latin sentenc

      Latin based rules that don't apply to English now. 1- Don't split infinitives 2- Don't end a sentence with a preposition

      There are more

    2. There are lots of other rules such as not starting a sentence with ‘and’, or ‘but’,or ‘because’ that you might remember from school, but these are what some grammarianscall ‘bogus’ or ‘zombie’ rules.

      Bogus/Zombie rules like:

      Don't start sentences with and, but or because

  19. Feb 2017
  20. Jan 2017
    1. clear

      Her ideas that "nature is the best teacher of eloquence" and rules only help a little is tricky. It seems that Astell is proclaiming that there are natural characteristics which make women effective rhetorically, but women must also follow rules in order to adhere to their nature and speak eloquently?

    1. noting that rigid adherence to rules does not guarantee favorable re-sponse and that deviating from rules often produces wonderful results.

      "It is an old observation, that the best writers sometimes disregard the rules of rhetoric. When they do so, however, the reader will usually find in the sentence some compensating merit, attained at the cost of the violation. Unless he is certain of doing as well, he will probably do best to follow the rules."

      William Strunk (The Elements of Style, Introduction)

  21. Nov 2015
    1. Thus,any of these occurrences can ramify acrosseach other, affecting and being affected inways that exceed whatever infrastructure isavailable

      Is this to say we need even more structure than what is already in place? Or will the things being contained eventually escape from that rule also?

  22. Jul 2015
    1. Sec. 15-7. - Injuring or defacing library property. Whoever willfully injures or defaces any book, newspaper, magazine, pamphlet, manuscript, or other property belonging to the city library by writing, marking, tearing, breaking, or otherwise mutilating shall be fined as provided in section 1-8. (Code 1964, amended, § 19.19(A)) Cross reference— Damage to public property, § 17-26. State Law reference— Criminal mischief, V.A.P.C. § 28.03; reckless damage of property, § 28.04.
  23. Oct 2013
    1. BY speakers, as well as writers, there are certain rules to be observed. Language is based on reason, antiquity, authority, custom. It is analogy, and sometimes etymology, that affords the chief support to reason. A certain majesty, and, if I may so express myself, religion, graces the antique.
    1. Quintilian does not give rules from which there is no departure;

      Rules made to be broken