9 Matching Annotations
  1. Sep 2018
    1. Although there are plenty of theories which could all be modelled, because the extant theory is so heavily based on assumptions which would have to be built into the models to make them work, they could all show interesting results which are, however, devoid of any resemblance to how culture actually happens

      Too many theories but enough agreed upon assumptions to create a model that could actually be applied nor a model that would accurately represent some aspect of reality.

    2. The resulting materialistic theory of consciousness2, where a „pandemonium‟ of various thoughts and nerve impulses struggle for expression, posits that what we comprehend as a serial stream of consciousness is actually a retrospectively experienced stream of narrative which was subject to continual editing as the various areas of the brain made their contributions.

      There is no photogrpahic memory for most people; every memory is being continuously edited in the mind,

    3. Rather, it is the usual practice to selectively pick examples from culture to help illustrate how memes may work and therefore convenient memes tend to be invoked to help description rather than candidates for real memes discovered in their cultural settings

      Only pragmatic examples

  2. Jul 2018
    1. The scene could come right out of today’s Blue Lives Matter meme factory. Along with images of warriors, weapons, and German shepherds, pictures of children—often little blond girls—hugging cops infuse the movement with an ominous sentimentalism.
  3. Mar 2018
  4. Feb 2017
    1. Potential of memes

      I found this part of the discussion to be rather interesting. I never thought of something like memes as being entry points into Elit--perhaps because they seem too "simplistic." But, if interacting with Elit has taught me anything, it's that it's made to be accessible. So, maybe it's whatever works, huh?

  5. Dec 2016
    1. This Digital History page about Political Cartoons is a great starting point for students of various comprehension and familiarity levels with the sub-topic within social studies / the study of popular culture of political cartoons. Each link takes students to simple definitions of "how to do history through political cartoons", "inquiry questions" and the "background of political cartoons" so students can familiarize themselves with them. At the end, students can link to some of the most popular ones throughout history, mostly created by Harpers Bizzare. Creating an assignment in which students analyze and create political cartoons from the past then political memes from the present would be an exciting way to show the ways in which politics have been examined through popular culture overtime.

  6. Dec 2015