11 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. The difference between PUT and POST is that PUT is idempotent: calling it once or several times successively has the same effect (that is no side effect), whereas successive identical POST requests may have additional effects, akin to placing an order several times.
  2. Jul 2021
    1. Idempotent just means that following a link twice has exactly the same effect on persistent state as clicking it once. It does not mean that following the link must not change state, just that after following it once, following it again must not change state further. There are good reasons to avoid GET requests for changing state, but that’s not what idempotent means.
  3. Oct 2020
    1. Final Form makes the assumption that your validation functions are "pure" or "idempotent", i.e. will always return the same result when given the same values.
    2. Final Form makes the assumption that your validation functions are "pure" or "idempotent", i.e. will always return the same result when given the same values. This is why it doesn't run the synchronous validation again (just to double check) before allowing the submission: because it's already stored the results of the last time it ran it.
  4. Sep 2020
    1. detach, as an api, should be declarative (ensure the node is detached) instead of imperative (detach the node), allowing it to be called multiple times by performing a noop if the node is already detached. This way, it won't matter if the node is removed from the DOM from outside of svelte.
  5. Apr 2020
    1. Just a subtle clarification here. Safe means no side-effects. Idempotent means the same side effect no matter how many time a service is called. All safe services are inherently idempotent because there are no side effects. Calling GET on a current-time resource multiple times would return a different result each time, but it's safe (and thus idempotent).
    1. In math, idempotence describes only unary functions that you can call on their own output. Math-idempotence is, “If you take the absolute value of a number, and then you take the absolute value of that, the result doesn’t change on the second (or subsequent) operations.” Math.abs is math-idempotent. Math-idempotence only applies to functions of one parameter where the parameter type and return type are the same. Not so useful in programming.
    2. Programming-idempotence is about side effects. It’s about stuff that happens to the outside world when you call a function. Idempotence says “If you’ve called me once, it doesn’t matter whether you called me again.”