6 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. Rather than thinking of useEffect as one function doing the job of 3 separate lifecycles, it might be more helpful to think of it simply as a way to run side effects after render – including the potential cleanup you’d want to do before each one, and before unmounting.
  2. Sep 2020
    1. By bringing both designers and non-designers alike into Figma, they create a cross-side network effect. In a direct network effect, a homogenous group gets more value from a product as more of them join. In contrast, a cross-side network effect involves two (or more) distinct groups that grow in size and value as the other group does, too. Figma’s cross-side network effect between designers and non-designers is one of the primary and under-appreciated sources of their compounding success over the last few years. As more designers use Figma, they pull in the non-designers they work with. Similarly, as these non-designers use Figma, they encourage the other designers they work with to use Figma. It’s a virtuous circle and a powerful compounding loop.

      By bringing non-designers into the design process, Figma created cross-side network effects for itself.

      Where typically the designers would get their designer peers to use the tools they're excited about, now non-designers would experience the value and recommend Figma to designers and non-designers alike.

  3. Aug 2020
    1. Anything that is added to a system to improve it (or make it more reliable!) increases complexity, thus uncertainty and risk. We have a bad habit of trying to add “more” to fix a problem, increase the layers of safety, band-aid over a system vulnerability, etc. We don’t often evaluate this, but this added complexity can (and does) make things worse. Wherever possible — and I know it isn’t always possible — remove something isntead of adding it. This is not usually politically favorable, something that Sr. Software Engineers who reduce the codebase size have often heard, but has far fewer side effects.
  4. May 2019
  5. May 2017
    1. RESULTS: After adjustment for potential confounders, use of azithromycin (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 1.65, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.34–2.02; 110 exposed cases), clarithromycin (adjusted OR 2.35, 95% CI 1.90–2.91; 111 exposed cases), metronidazole (adjusted OR 1.70, 95% CI 1.27–2.26; 53 exposed cases), sulfonamides (adjusted OR 2.01, 95% CI 1.36–2.97; 30 exposed cases), tetracyclines (adjusted OR 2.59, 95% CI 1.97–3.41; 67 exposed cases) and quinolones (adjusted OR 2.72, 95% CI 2.27–3.27; 160 exposed cases) was associated with an increased risk of spontaneous abortion.

      This shows between a 65% to 272% increased risk of miscarriage from use of common antibiotics.

      The risk is being characterized as "small' - http://www.cnn.com/2017/05/01/health/antibiotics-miscarriage-study/

      I'm not sure any pregnant woman would characterize more than doubling of the risk as small, and we can assume that if this data was shown for a natural substance, it would be characterized differently.

  6. Aug 2016