237 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
  2. Dec 2020
  3. Nov 2020
  4. Oct 2020
    1. Some legislation allows for treatment to be given in certain circumstances without the patient's volition. For example, irresponsible people with communicable diseases may be treated against their objection, as in the case of patients with tuberculosis who are noncompliant with treatment. Also, all provinces allow for the involuntary admission of patients to psychiatric facilities, provided they present an immediate risk to themselves or others, or are unable to take care of themselves

      These highlight cases where you can treat patients without their consent.

      1. Irresponsible people with communicable diseases (e.g. Tuberculosis)

      2. Psychiatry patients that pose an immediate threat to themselves and/or those around them.

  5. Sep 2020
  6. Aug 2020
    1. what might be learned from the case. The answer, in part, is that prudent psychiatrists and other therapists will want to be thoughtful about how they arrange follow-up care for patients whom they can no longer see.Sometimes a general suggestion that a patient seek follow-up care will be adequate. However, as the patient's condition warrants, clinicians might choose, in ascending order of time commitment, to provide the patient with the name of a particular practitioner or facility, to contact the facility to ascertain that a clinician is willing to see the patient, to help the patient make an appointment, or, with the patient's permission, to make an appointment on the patient's behalf. In some cases, it may be appropriate to ask for the patient's permission to contact his or her family to indicate a need for follow-up and to encourage the family to make sure that follow-up takes place. But of these approaches, no specific one will always be indicated, and the degree of assistance rendered the patient should be calibrated to his or her individual needs.

      What can be learned from this case?

      • Carefully plan follow up plans with patients (general suggestion about follow up can be enough)
      • Ask patient for family information to help them get involved in the follow up process and help increase compliance.

      Consider:

      • Giving the specific name of a provider to follow up with
      • How to contact the facility,
      • See if who you provided/recommended is avaliable to take the patient
      • Help patient make the appointment or make it on their behalf (with permission)
    2. One final questionable aspect of the jury's verdict relates to the legal requirement that before a judgment of malpractice can be reached, any departures from the standard of care must be shown to have been the proximate cause of the resulting harms. The most common test for whether an act or omission constitutes a proximate cause is whether it was reasonably foreseeable at the time that the negligent act occurred that would result in the consequent harms. Williamson had no history of violent behavior and had never revealed a violent impulse during treatment. It is impossible to conclude that he was foreseeably dangerous at the time he was seen by Dr. Liptzin.

      The test for proximate cause "is whether it was reasonably foreseeable at the time that the negligent act occurred that would result in the consequent harms"

      In this case, Dr. Liptzin, having seen Williamson having no history of violence or anything else, could not reasonably foresee that Williamson was going to do something illegal.

  7. Jul 2020
  8. Jun 2020
  9. May 2020
  10. Apr 2020
    1. Newton, P. N., Bond, K. C., Adeyeye, M., Antignac, M., Ashenef, A., Awab, G. R., Babar, Z.-U.-D., Bannenberg, W. J., Bond, K. C., Bower, J., Breman, J., Brock, A., Caillet, C., Coyne, P., Day, N., Deats, M., Douidy, K., Doyle, K., Dujardin, C., … Zaman, M. (2020). COVID-19 and risks to the supply and quality of tests, drugs, and vaccines. The Lancet Global Health, S2214109X20301364. https://doi.org/10.1016/S2214-109X(20)30136-4

    1. Abdulla, A., Wang, B., Qian, F., Kee, T., Blasiak, A., Ong, Y. H., Hooi, L., Parekh, F., Soriano, R., Olinger, G. G., Keppo, J., Hardesty, C. L., Chow, E. K., Ho, D., & Ding, X. (n.d.). Project IDentif.AI: Harnessing Artificial Intelligence to Rapidly Optimize Combination Therapy Development for Infectious Disease Intervention. Advanced Therapeutics, n/a(n/a), 2000034. https://doi.org/10.1002/adtp.202000034

  11. Mar 2020
    1. Cancer - a symbolic drama between mother and child Bahne-Bahnson (1982) notes that people suffering from cancer experience in a psychosomatic way old emotional deficits that have never been consciously addressed. He suggests that cancer patients have been deprived of being innocent children, and that many of them had to look after and emotionally support their parents. These people missed out on much of the essential emotional nurturing that would have allowed them to develop a strong sense of self.
  12. Jan 2020
  13. Dec 2019
    1. blood circulate

      The early modern English physician William Harvey (1578-1627) made several valuable contributions to the medical sciences, including the circulation of blood in the human body. In De Motu Cordis (1628), Harvey sets down his landmark experiments; in these, Harvey used ligatures to stem blood flow to better understand how the heart works to pump blood throughout the human body. This knowledge will be critical for Victor's creation of the Creature.

    2. physiology

      By 1818 physiology had become a controversial branch of medicine at the center of the dispute between vitalism, the idea that a divine spark energized animal life, and materialism, the argument that chemical processes alone give rise to life. Mary Shelley was well aware of the dispute since the Shelleys' family doctor, William Lawrence, was vigorously taking up the materialist argument in works like An Introduction to Comparative Anatomy and Physiology (1816). For a full view of this controversy as it relates to the novel, see Marilyn Butler, "Frankenstein and Radical Science" [1993] reprinted in J. Paul Hunter, Frankenstein, Norton Critical Edition, second ed. (New York: Norton, 2012): 404-416.

    3. scarlet fever

      Scarlet fever is a disease caused by a streptococcus infection, most common among children and young adults. Until the discovery of penicillin in the early 20th Century, it was frequently fatal. Also compare the 1831 edition, in which Elizabeth's condition is more "severe."

  14. Nov 2019
    1. Considerable obstacles remain, however, before the genetic therapy can be tested on human heart attack patients. Most of the treated pigs died after the treatment because the microRNA-199 continued to be expressed in an uncontrolled way.

      My imagination is running wild, but not in a good way. 😞

  15. Oct 2019
    1. Two years ago, when he moved from Boston to London, he had to register with a general practitioner. The doctor’s office gave him a form to sign saying that his medical data would be shared with other hospitals he might go to, and with a system that might distribute his information to universities, private companies and other government departments.The form added that the although the data are anonymized, “there are those who believe a person can be identified through this information.”“That was really scary,” Dr. de Montjoye said. “We are at a point where we know a risk exists and count on people saying they don’t care about privacy. It’s insane.”
    1. hangover

      Hangover is the sickness people experience such headache, nausea, and light sensitivity after comsuming too much alcohol.

      Source from https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/hangovers/symptoms-causes/syc-20373012.

    2. blood poisoning

      Blood Poisoning is a serious infection caused by the bacteria in the bloodstream. The infection has nothing to do with "poison". It actually refers to bacteremia, septicemia and sepsis. Source from https://www.healthline.com/health/blood-poisoning.

  16. Sep 2019
  17. Aug 2019
    1. heIndiansaretakingInninitoLapointeheisverysickIsgoing,tobecuredbythemedicinemenatLapointe

      Innini is being taken to La Pointe to see the doctors there

    2. heTaw-Rouzecameinthismorningtoaskmeforalittlephysio.Itold[him]Iwouldgivehimsomesalts.Wehadverylittleofthat.Hesaidhehadbeensickagoodmanydays.Igave.himsome.Iwenttohislodgethisafternoon,themedecinehadoppor—atedwe

      the Taw-Rouze (Native Doctor?) asks Mrs. Ely for salt because he has been sick

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  18. Jul 2019
    1. Two years ago, when he moved from Boston to London, he had to register with a general practitioner. The doctor’s office gave him a form to sign saying that his medical data would be shared with other hospitals he might go to, and with a system that might distribute his information to universities, private companies and other government departments.The form added that the although the data are anonymized, “there are those who believe a person can be identified through this information.”“That was really scary,” Dr. de Montjoye said. “We are at a point where we know a risk exists and count on people saying they don’t care about privacy. It’s insane.”
  19. Jun 2019
    1. AfterDoct..vaccinatectheIndc.prezent,hoembarkedinacanoeforthenotoVaccinaho.la.werethe

      at an exchange of gifts, the Natives present are vaccinated and those in the gardens are looked for to be vaccinated

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  20. May 2019
  21. Apr 2019
    1. Balm of Mecca[edit] Forskal found the plant occurring between Mecca and Medina. He considered it to be the genuine balsam-plant and named it Amyris opobalsamum Forsk. (together with two other varieties, A. kataf Forsk. and A. kafal Forsk.).[4] Its Arabic name is abusham or basham, which is identical with the Hebrew bosem or beshem.[6] Bruce found the plant occurring in Abyssinia.[3] In the 19th century it was discovered in the East Indies also.[4] Linnaeus distinguished two varieties: Amyris gileadensis L. (= Amyris opobalsamum Forsk.), and Amyris opobalsamum L., the variant found by Belon in a garden near Cairo, brought there from Arabia Felix. More recent naturalists (Lindley, Wight and Walker) have included the species Amyris gileadensis L. in the genus Protium.[4] Botanists enumerate sixteen balsamic plants of this genus, each exhibiting some peculiarity.[6] There is little reason to doubt that the plants of the Jericho balsam gardens were stocked with Amyris gileadensis L., or Amyris opobalsamum, which was found by Bruce in Abyssinia, the fragrant resin of which is known in commerce as the "balsam of Mecca".[3] According to De Sacy, the true balm of Gilead (or Jericho) has long been lost, and there is only "balm of Mecca".[6] Newer designations of the balsam plant are Commiphora gileadensis (L.) Christ., Balsamodendron meccansis Gled. and Commiphora opobalsamum.
  22. Feb 2019
    1. Cure of those El'ils

      A medicinal model of education. "Hi, I'm Thomas Sheridan. All these dumbasses are hopelessly lost because they don't speak correctly. They'll never do anything good, or see what good is, because bad speech runs rampant. The only hope is to heal them by teaching them to speak well. That is, like me."

    1. Good website explaining PICO including af videotutorial . provided by the University Library of Illinois, Chicago

    1. Mechanical medi

      Interesting wording here. We are always dependent upon machines even in medicine. Is medicine still natural today?