6 Matching Annotations
  1. Nov 2021
    1. Last year Joshua Katz, a popular Princeton classics professor, wrote an article critical of a letter published by a group of Princeton faculty on race. In response The Daily Princetonian, a student newspaper, spent seven months investigating his past relationships with students, eventually convincing university officials to relitigate incidents from years earlier that had already been adjudicated—a classic breach of James Madison’s belief that no one should be punished for the same thing twice. The Daily Princetonian investigation looks more like an attempt to ostracize a professor guilty of wrong-think than an attempt to bring resolution to a case of alleged misbehavior.

      The example of Joshua Katz brings up the idea of double jeopardy within the social sphere. Is this form of punishment ethical or fair? Also, while those transgressions were held to account by the norms of their day, were there other larger harms (entailing unwritten rules) to humanity that weren't adjudicated at the time which are now coming to the surface as part of a bigger aggregate harm?

      It could be seen as related to the idea of reparations. In some sense, aside from the general harms of war—in which they participated—the South and slave holders in particular were never held to account or punished for their crimes against humanity. Though they may have felt as if they were. Where are those harms adjudicated? Because of a quirk of fate and poor politics following the Civil War and not being held to account, have those in the South continued perpetuating many of the same harms they were doing, simply in different guises? When will they be held to account? How would reparations look in the form of a national level of restorative justice?

  2. Feb 2021
  3. Jun 2020
  4. Mar 2019
    1. reaffirming its faith in government of the people, by the people, for the people

      "The Party of Lincoln." (Lincoln's death was only 51 years in the past in 1916.)

  5. Sep 2016
  6. online.salempress.com.lacademy.idm.oclc.org online.salempress.com.lacademy.idm.oclc.org
    1. El Salvador's population growth has slowed, with a decline in the number of youths and a slowly aging population. Life expectancy is 71 years for men and 78 years for women (2014 estimate). Over one million Salvadorans, or approximately 20 percent of the population, live abroad, mainly because of economic and social hardship within their native country. During the civil war, an estimated 75,000 Salvadorans were killed.

      I found this interesting because El Salvador has quite a small population, so 75,000 people is a lot of people to die in a civil war.

    1. El Salvador's population growth has slowed, with a decline in the number of youths and a slowly aging population. Life expectancy is 71 years for men and 78 years for women (2014 estimate). Over one million Salvadorans, or approximately 20 percent of the population, live abroad, mainly because of economic and social hardship within their native country. During the civil war, an estimated 75,000 Salvadorans were killed

      I find that the last part of this is pretty interesting. Seeming that El Salvador doesn't have that big of a population, a civil war where 75,000 people died is pretty huge.