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  1. Last 7 days
    1. and medical authority. Why am I – a public health doctor – so distressed by the mandatory masks policy?  And why are people telling me it would be brave to write about this? I’ve been wondering for a while why I feel so upset about it.  I’ve no health or disability exemptions, and can wear a mask with no more inconvenience than anyone else.  My menagerie of relatives and friends with deafness, cognitive difficulties or other exemptions is average.  Does it trigger memories of being mugged in the dark ?  Nice try, but I haven’t thought about that for years. 
    1. Eric Topol [@EricTopol] (2020-08-16) Kids and covid

      1. On the rise as proportion of total infections @sdutgraphics @theheroofthyme. Twitter. https://twitter.com/erictopol/status/1295069178760552451
    2. 5. New report @Mehganteherani @EmoryPediatrics @jpidsociety @Abxaware
    3. 2. Front page @sdut today, the San Diego experience to date by @PaulSisson @radychildrens ~30,000 kids tests, 3.4% positive (overall here 4.8%) Kids hospitalized 5.6%, Adults 8.3%; much less ICU (7 v 25%)
    4. 1. On the rise as proportion of total infections @sdutgraphics @theheroofthyme
    5. Jo Maugham QC [@jolyonMaugham] (2020, August) Calling on retired lawyers! Law students! Bored lawyers! We at @GoodLawProject need your help with some research... we are working on what will be (well, if we win it) seminal litigation to establish the precautionary principle as a freestanding part of E&W common law! Twitter. Retrieved from: https://twitter.com/JolyonMaugham/status/1296092565075369984

    1. Erik, as people inside and outside Sweden continue to grapple with what exactly the Swedish strategy might have been, there are two aspects that have seemed potentially troubling to me (and only more so in light of the FOI email releases): 1/21RepliesReconfigBehSci@SciBeh·18 Aug 2020Replying to @SciBeh and @ErikAngner2/2 1. mandatory schooling (where there exemptions for immune-compromised parents?) 2. encouraging household members of infected individuals to go to work/school Could you provide more background here and how you see these policies in the wider context?
    1. Mambrini. A. Baronchelli. A. Starnini. M. Marinazzo. D. De Domenico, M. (2020) .PRINCIPIA: a Decentralized Peer-Review Ecosystem. Retrieved from: chrome-extension://bjfhmglciegochdpefhhlphglcehbmek/pdfjs/web/viewer.html?file=https%3A%2F%2Farxiv.org%2Fpdf%2F2008.09011.pdf

  2. Dec 2020
    1. Bu Experts {@BU Experts} (2020) How can we navigate daily life during the pandemic? #Publichealth expert & epidemiologist @EpiEllie will be on @reddit_AMA this Thursday (8/27) at 12pm ET to answer all of your #COVID19-related questions. She'll discuss how to safely see friends and family, travel & more. @BUSPH. Twitter. Retrieved from: https://twitter.com/BUexperts/status/1297932614909792258

    1. Emily. J. Miller. - FDA {@FDASpox} (2020) Convalescent plasma has shown to be beneficial for 35% of patients. This risk reduction figure - shown in chart below - is from @MayoClinic data from expanded access program that was analyzed by FDAA for the emergency use authorization announced today. Twitter. Retrieved from: https://twitter.com/FDASpox/status/1297706985039835136

    1. Weiskittle, R. E., Mlinac, M., & Nicole Downing, L. (2020, August 25). Addressing COVID-19 Worry and Social Isolation in Home-Based Primary Care. https://doi.org/10.31234/osf.io/483zv

    2. Social distancing measures following the outbreak of COVID-19 have led to a rapid shift to virtual and telephone care. Social workers and mental health providers in VA home-based primary care (HBPC) teams face challenges providing psychosocial support to their homebound, medically complex, socially isolated patient population who are high risk for poor health outcomes related to COVID-19. We developed and disseminated an 8-week telephone or virtual group intervention for front-line HBPC social workers and mental health providers to use with socially isolated, medically complex older adults. The intervention draws on skills from evidence-based psychotherapies for older adults including Acceptance and Commitment Therapy, Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy, and Problem-Solving Therapy. The manual was disseminated to VA HBPC clinicians and geriatrics providers across the United States in March 2020 for expeditious implementation. Eighteen HBPC teams and three VA Primary Care teams reported immediate delivery of a local virtual or telephone group using the manual. In this paper we describe the manual’s development and clinical recommendations for its application across geriatric care settings. Future evaluation will identify ways to meet longer-term social isolation and evolving mental health needs for this patient population as the pandemic continues.
    1. Muge Cevik [mugecevik] (2020/09/21) Over the last 6 months, we've learned a lot about how SARS-CoV-2 spreadsMicrobe What does the evidence so far tell us about SARS-CoV-2 transmission dynamics, high-risk activities and environments? Thread Thread (1/n) https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=3692807 [tweet]. [twitter], https://twitter.com/mugecevik/status/1308080079763902464

    2. Early viral load peak in the disease course indicates that preventing onward transmission requires immediate self-isolation with symptom onset (for a min of 5 days). Messages should prioritise isolation practices, and policies should include supported isolation. (24/n)
    3. ur article is now published online. We argue that SARS-CoV-2 transmission dynamics should inform policy decisions about mitigation strategies for targeted interventions. https://academic.oup.com/cid/advance-article/doi/10.1093/cid/ciaa1442/5910315
    4. This thread is based on our new paper with @JuliaLMarcus Caroline Buckee and @aetiology Accepted in CID - preprint version can be accessed here: (https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=3692807…)
    5. Public health strategies will be needed to mitigate transmission in nursing homes, prisons and jails, shelters, meat-packing plants such as personal protective equipment and routine testing to identify infected individuals early in the disease course. (28/n)
    6. Avoid crowded indoor poorly ventilated environments. Spend more time outdoors. Maintain your distance (more is better but 2 metre is not a panacea). Improve ventilation: open windows/doors. Wear a mask indoors. Wash hands. (27/n) (https://vox.com/science-and-health/2020/5/22/21265180/cdc-coronavirus-surfaces-social-distancing-guidelines-covid-19-risks…)
    7. Policymakers and health experts can help the public differentiate between lower-risk and higher-risk activities and environments and public health messages could convey a spectrum of risk to the public to support engagement in alternatives for safer interaction (26/n
    8. There are many things that could be done within families to decrease transmission. We need to provide clear instructions, and means of support to enable those with symptoms/positive test and their contacts to isolate. (25/n) https://abc.net.au/news/2020-09-15/coronavirus-swept-through-jos-house.-heres-how-he-dodged-it/12660218
    9. hese include social and income protection and support to ensure low paid, non-salaried and zero-hours contract workers can afford to follow isolation and quarantine recommendations, provision of protective equipment for workplaces and community settings. (23/n)
    10. In summary: The disproportionate impact of COVID-19 on households living in poverty, and the racial and ethnic disparities observed in many countries, emphasize the need to urgently update our definition of "vulnerable" populations for COVID-19 & address these inequities. (22/n)
    11. A real overlap in the causes of mortality and deprivation can be seen here. The age-standardised rate of deaths involving COVID-19 in the most deprived quintile was more than double (2.3 times higher) than in the least deprived quintile in Scotland. (21/n) https://nrscotland.gov.uk/files/statistics/covid19/covid-deaths-report-week-19.pdf
    12. Covid-19 could now be endemic in some parts of England that combine severe deprivation, poor housing and large BAME communities, national lockdown in these parts of the north of England had little effect in reducing the level of infections (20/n) (https://theguardian.com/world/2020/sep/05/covid-19-could-be-endemic-in-deprived-parts-of-england//…)
    13. Previous research suggests that although social distancing during the 2009 H1N1 pandemic was effective in reducing infections, this was most pronounced in households w greater socioeconomic advantage. Similar findings are emerging for COVID-19. (19/n) (https://pnas.org/content/117/33/19658//…)
    14. n Madrid, 37 neighbourhoods are seeing the highest incidence, 4 x the Spanish average. Common factors: these areas are poorer, denser and have a high proportion of immigrant population. (18/n) (https://elpais.com/sociedad/2020-09-19/como-son-las-zonas-restringidas-en-madrid-mas-densas-con-mas-inmigrantes-y-sobre-todo-mas-pobres.html…)
    15. PHE surveillance report shows that while the number of infections is increasing mainly in 20-29, 30-39 ages in England, SARS-CoV-2 is spreading most in highly deprived areas - where people are in poorly paid work and can't afford to isolate. (17/n) https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/919676/Weekly_COVID19_Surveillance_Report_week_38_FINAL_UPDATED.pdf
    16. Households in socioeconomically deprived areas are more likely to be overcrowded, increasing the risk of transmission within the household. These disparities also shape the strong geographic heterogeneities observed in the burden of cases and deaths. (16/n)
    17. People in lower-paid occupations are often classified as essential workers who must work outside the home and may travel to work on public transport. These occupations often involve greater social mixing, exposure risk due to prolonged working hours and job insecurity. (15/n)
    18. Socioeconomic factors and racial/ethnic disparities: Global figures suggest that COVID-19 pandemic is strongly shaped by structural inequities, adverse living and working conditions and structural racism that drive household and occupational risks. (14/n)
    19. The largest clusters of cases observed in the USA have all been associated with prisons or jails. In the largest meat packing plant in Germany, while the common point of potential contact was workplace, risk was higher for a single shared apartment, bedroom and carpool. (13/n)
    20. Much worryingly the largest outbreaks from across the world are reported in long term care facilities such as nursing homes, homeless shelters, prisons, and meat-packing plants where many people spend several hours working, living together, and share communal spaces. (12/n)
    21. Replying to @mugecevikThe largest clusters of cases observed in the USA have all been associated with prisons or jails. In the largest meat packing plant in Germany, while the common point of potential contact was workplace, risk was higher for a single shared apartment, bedroom and carpool. (13/n)
    22. Much worryingly the largest outbreaks from across the world are reported in long term care facilities such as nursing homes, homeless shelters, prisons, and meat-packing plants where many people spend several hours working, living together, and share communal spaces. (12/n)
    23. Prolonged indoor contact in a crowded and poorly ventilated environment increases the risk of transmission substantially. But decreasing occupancy and improving ventilation through opening windows/doors can lower the risk. (11/n)
    24. While asymptomatic patients can transmit the virus to others, emerging evidence suggests that asymptomatic index cases transmit to fewer secondary cases. Attack rates are highly correlated with symptom severity (8/n) (https://medrxiv.org/content/10.1101/2020.09.01.20135194v1…) and (https://medrxiv.org/content/10.1101/2020.04.25.20079103v3…)
    25. Prolonged indoor contact in a crowded and poorly ventilated environment increases the risk of transmission substantially. But decreasing occupancy and improving ventilation through opening windows/doors can lower the risk. (11/n)
    26. Environment: Contact pattern also depends on the setting of the encounter. Contact tracing studies suggest an almost 20x higher risk of transmission indoors compared with outdoor environments. (10/n) (https://ft.com/content/2418ff87-1d41-41b5-b638-38f5164a2e94…)
    27. Transmission is also affected by other host factors, including host defence mechanisms and age. For instance, given the same exposure, susceptibility to infection increases with age, higher in > 60yo compared to younger or middle-aged adults. (9/n) (https://medrxiv.org/content/10.1101/2020.07.19.20157362v2…)
    28. When we look at the viral load dynamics & contact tracing studies, those who are infected are very infectious for a short window, likely 1-2 days before and 5 days following symptom onset. No transmission documented so far after the first week of symptom onset. (7/n)
    29. Individual factors: Many ppl either do not infect anyone or infect a single person, and a large number of secondary cases are caused by a small # of infected ppl. Although this also is related to other factors, individual variation in infectiousness plays a major role.(6/n)
    30. For non-household contacts, engaging in group activities such as dining together or board games have been found to be high risk for transmission. So, the risk increases with longer & frequent exposure, close proximity, # of contacts, and group activities especially dining (5/n)
    31. Even in the same household being a spouse/partner, sleeping in the same room or sharing the same sleeping space, frequent daily contact with the index case, and dining in close proximity has been associated with increased risk of transmission. (4/n)
    32. Contact pattern: We now know that sustained close contact drives the majority of infections and clusters. For instance, close family/friend contacts and gatherings are a higher risk for transmission than market shopping or brief community encounters. (3/n)
    33. Over the last 6 months, we've learned a lot about how SARS-CoV-2 spreads What does the evidence so far tell us about SARS-CoV-2 transmission dynamics, high-risk activities and environments? Thread (1/n) https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=3692807
    1. Jonathan Cohn {@CitizenCohn} (2020/09/02) Iowa COVID numbers are spiking. Jodi Ernst says she doesn't believe them, suggests doctors may be inflating figures to get higher reimbursement. Via @wcfcourier https://wcfcourier.com/news/local/ernst-in-rural-waterloo-says-senate-race-will-be-expensive-close/article_c29ee1b6-be44-5dc7-ab11-7261353cda39.html.[Tweet}, [Twitter], https://twitter.com/CitizenCohn/status/1300979425471799303

    2. More from @IAStartingLine
    3. atest Iowa COVID case numbers, for context https://nytimes.com/interactive/2020/us/iowa-coronavirus-cases.html…
    4. I'd say it's shocking that a sitting senator would be floating the (debunked) idea that COVID actually killed less than 10,000 people, but of course the president was retweeting it so I guess it's not so shocking after all.
    5. owa COVID numbers are spiking. Jodi Ernst says she doesn't believe them, suggests doctors may be inflating figures to get higher reimbursement. Via @wcfcourier https://wcfcourier.com/news/local/ernst-in-rural-waterloo-says-senate-race-will-be-expensive-close/article_c29ee1b6-be44-5dc7-ab11-7261353cda39.html…
    1. Ed Yong [@edyong209] (2020). One amazing way to do this would be to control the pandemic; Venmo me. Twitter. Retrieved from: https://twitter.com/edyong209/status/1300588785634340864

    2. 2020-09-01

    3. Stuaert Rtchie [@StuartJRitchie] (2020) This encapsulates the problem nicely. Sure, there’s a paper. But actually read it & what do you find? p-values mostly juuuust under .05 (a red flag) and a sample size that’s FAR less than “25m”. If you think this is in any way compelling evidence, you’ve totally been sold a pup. Twitter. Retrieved from:https://twitter.com/StuartJRitchie/status/1305963050302877697

    1. KFF (Kaiser Family Foundation) @KFF (2020) RT @KFF @DrewAltman discusses two fundamental policy decisions made by the Trump administration that set the U.S. on the controversial an…

    1. ReconfigBehSci @SciBeh (2020) For those who might think this issue isn't settled yet, the piece include below has further graphs indicating just how much "protecting the economy" is associated with "keeping the virus under control" Twitter. Retrieved from: https://twitter.com/i/web/status/1306216113722871808

    1. sadly squares with my own impression of social media 'debate' - as someone who works on both argumentation and belief formation across social networks, this strikes me as every bit as big a problem as the spread of conspiracy
    2. ReconfigBehSci {@SciBeh} (2020) sadly squares with my own impression of social media 'debate' - as someone who works on both argumentation and belief formation across social networks, this strikes me as every bit as big a problem as the spread of conspiracy. Twitter. Retrieved from: https://twitter.com/i/web/status/1308341816333340672

    1. ReconfigBehSci {@SciBeh} (2020) The pandemic proves we all should know ‘psychological first aid.’ Here are the basics. /lifestyle/wellness/pandemic-psychological-first-aid-anxiety/2020/09/21/7c68d746-fc23-11ea-9ceb-061d646d9c67_story.html?tid=ss_tw. Twitter. Retrieved from: https://twitter.com/SciBeh/status/1308461925785837573

  3. Sep 2020
    1. 2020-08-21

    2. This study sought to assess the extent of SARS-CoV-2 transmission among asymptomatic persons on a long-haul flight from Milan, Italy to South Korea. It found an estimated attack rate of 0.3% from infections likely obtained during the flight, and an overall prevalence of 2.3% for the disease from people who boarded the flight without symptoms. While it is impossible for them to determine for sure whether these infections were from the flight or prior, it highlights that with high adherence to passengers using high-quality masks whenever possible and social distancing by at least 6 feet, transmission can be very low during air travel.
    3. Asymptomatic Transmission of SARS-CoV-2 on Evacuation Flight
    1. 2020-09-22

    2. All European Union countries are undergoing severe output losses as a consequence of COVID-19, but some have been hurt more than others. Factors potentially influencing the degree of economic contraction include the severity of lockdown measures, the structure of national economies, public indebtedness, and the quality of governance in different countries. With the exception of public indebtedness, we find all these factors are significant to varying degrees.
    3. Why has COVID-19 hit different European Union economies so differently?
    1. Kubinec, Robert & Carvalho, Luiz & Barceló, Joan & Cheng, Cindy & Hartnett, Allison & Messerschmidt, Luca & Duba, Derek & Cottrell, Matthew Sean, 2020. "Partisanship and the Spread of COVID-19 in the United States," SocArXiv jp4wk, Center for Open Science.
    2. Kubinec, Robert & Carvalho, Luiz & Barceló, Joan & Cheng, Cindy & Hartnett, Allison & Messerschmidt, Luca & Duba, Derek & Cottrell, Matthew Sean, 2020. "Partisanship and the Spread of COVID-19 in the United States," SocArXiv jp4wk, Center for Open Science. Retrieved from: https://ideas.repec.org/p/osf/socarx/jp4wk.html

    3. DOI: 10.31219/osf.io/jp4wk
    4. In this paper we use a Bayesian latent variable model to identify the effect of sociopolitical covariates on the historical COVID-19 infection rate among the 50 states. The model is calibrated using serology surveys issued by the Center for Disease Control. We show that as of July 14th, there are approximately 10 million people who have been infected with COVID-19 in the United States, and these people are concentrated in states that voted against President Donald Trump in 2016, are less concerned about COVID-19, are relatively unlikely to wear masks, and have fewer economic resources. Second, we find that increased mobility measured by Google cell phones in grocery stores and retail establishments has the highest correlation with subsequent COVID-19 spread, and that mobility is an important mediator of covariates and the spread of the disease. However, although support for President Trump correlates strongly with reduced COVID-19 infections, we find that this result does not come about via reduced mobility. Instead, it would appear more likely that conservative states were spared early outbreaks due to random or exogenous factors, and instead people may be inferring that partisanship has a causal effect on the disease when in fact it is likely a confounded association.
    5. Partisanship and the Spread of COVID-19 in the United States
    1. very interesting paper on the difference-in-difference method for estimating causal effects in the absence of a control group
    1. SciBeh is organising a workshop on "Building an online information environment for policy relevant science" Mark the date, Nov. 9/10, 2020, join us, contact us with thoughts and suggestions, and RT!

      2020-09-25

    2. SciBeh is organising a workshop on "Building an online information environment for policy relevant science" Mark the date, Nov. 9/10, 2020, join us, contact us with thoughts and suggestions, and RT!
    1. 10.31234/osf.io/a7huq
    2. "Fake news" are widely acknowledged as an important challenge for Western democracies. Yet, surprisingly little effort has been devoted to measuring the effects of various counter-strategies. We address this void by running a pre-registered field experiment analyzing the causal effects of popular fact-checking videos on both believing and sharing fake news among Twitter users (N = 1,600). We find that the videos improve truth discernment ability as measured by performance in a fake news quiz immediately after exposure. However, the videos have not reduced sharing links from verified "fake news" websites on Twitter in the weeks following the exposure. Indeed, we find no relationship between truth discernment ability and fake news sharing. These results imply that the development of effective interventions should be based on a nuanced view of the distinct psychological motivations of sharing and believing "fake news".
    3. "Fact-checking" videos reduce belief in but not the sharing of "fake news" on Twitter
    1. 2020-09-24

    2. 10.31234/osf.io/9dmgf
    3. Political social media use has become the topic of a growing amount of scholarship. In this regard, the role of user behavior in the formation of politically homogeneous environments (so-called echo chambers) is not fully understood. Building on the concept of selective exposure, we introduce the notion of selective political friending, i.e., the preference for political like-mindedness in social affiliations on social networking sites. In a pre-registered laboratory experiment (N = 199), we find that users preferably build connections to those who share opinions toward controversial political issues. Political like-mindedness outperforms advantages based on the popularity of another user or the career-related fit with another user. Political friending is particularly pronounced when individuals’ pre-existing opinions are strong, while tendencies toward cognitive closure and the desire for shared reality do not impact like-minded friending. The present study unravels psychological patterns in the process of tie-building on SNS and points to the necessity to take motivational complexity into account when studying phenomena linked to political homogeneity. Being the first study to systematically address politically motivated contact choices on social networking sites jointly with their psychological antecedents, this study sheds new light on the debate about like-mindedness in online communication. See less
    4. We're a Good Match: Selective Political Friending on Social Networking Sites
  4. pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov