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  1. Last 7 days
    1. I will give a modified version of what health care workers were advised during the worst of the shortages. Rotating a few is enough for disinfection. Just let them rest for a few days in a non-airtight container (like a paper bag or a Tupperware container with holes) and replace one only when it no longer fits well or the elastics have gone soft, or if it is soiled. It’s also good to use hand-sanitizer before putting them on and taking them off. Handle them gently, because a good fit is essential to getting the most out of it. My sense from having heard a lot from people using all the other disinfection methods, like heat, is that they just increase the risk of damaging the mask.

      They've definitely buried the lede here, but this is the answer everyone will be looking for.

    2. Many people have had to turn to social media to wade through all this, and that is quite unfortunate. There is a lot of excellent expertise out there, and one can find someone with the right credential on almost any claim. But experts with seemingly excellent credentials are contradicting one another all the time, as you saw. Plus, not everyone is equally good at communicating. Further, some discussions among experts — the nitty-gritty about some remote possibility that’s potentially concerning but not a big threat now — can frighten people without the background to appreciate the contexts.

      This is a great synopsis of problems in science communication.

    1. ReconfigBehSci on Twitter: ‘1 week to the SciBeh workshop “Building an online information environment for policy relevant science” Join us, register now! Topics: Crisis open science, interfacing to policy, online discourse, tools for research curation talks, panels, hackathons https://t.co/Gsr66BRGcJ https://t.co/uRrhSb9t05’ / Twitter. (n.d.). Retrieved 2 March 2021, from https://twitter.com/SciBeh/status/1323207455283826690

    1. Adam Kucharski. (2020, December 13). I’ve turned down a lot of COVID-related interviews/events this year because topic was outside my main expertise and/or I thought there were others who were better placed to comment. Science communication isn’t just about what you take part in – it’s also about what you decline. [Tweet]. @AdamJKucharski. https://twitter.com/AdamJKucharski/status/1338079300097077250

    1. ReconfigBehSci. (2020, November 25). @ToddHorowitz3 @sciam do you mean the specific article is bad, or the wider claim/argument? Because as someone who does research on collective intelligence, I’d say there is some reason to believe it is true that there can be “too much” communication in science. See e.g. The work of Kevin Zollman [Tweet]. @SciBeh. https://twitter.com/SciBeh/status/1331672900550725634

  2. Feb 2021
    1. Die Dokumentation erhielt die Auszeichnung als „Bester Wissenschaftsfilm“ beim Internationalen Green Screen Naturfilmfestival in Eckernförde 2020. Die Einschätzung der internationalen Jury des Green Screen Festivals in der Laudatio zum Film: „Er zeigt anhand anschaulicher Einzelschicksale und verstörender Bilder die Auswirkungen des Klimawandels auf Rentierhirten und die Natur Sibiriens, ohne den globalen Bezug aus den Augen zu verlieren." Außerdem gewann der Film 2020 beim „Jackson Wild Festival“ in der Kategorie „Best Changing Planet Film - Long Form“.

      Ein differenzierter und bedrückender Film über die Folgen der globalen Erhitzung in Sibirien. Zwei Zitate: "In Sibirien wurde die Büchse der Pandora geöffnet." Und: "Die Nenzen stehen schon jetzt vor einer Entscheidung, die den Verursachern des Klimawandels noch erspart bleibt, der zwischen zwei Übeln. In ihrem Fall: Sollen ihre Rentiere verhungern oder erfrieren?"

    1. ReconfigBehSci on Twitter: ‘@taylorgrayson @skepticscience @ClimateOfGavin @kostas_exarhia I guess this depends on what kind of misinformation/’conspiracy" you are faced with. In the context of climate denial, there is evidence that understanding of expert consensus can impact belief @STWOrg" / Twitter. (n.d.). Retrieved 19 February 2021, from https://twitter.com/SciBeh/status/1361608256486047748

    1. Dank der tollen Unterstützung von @TheRealTweetmo , Thomas Traill & Ulrike Hahn gibt es jetzt die deutsche Übersetzung des Anfang Januar erschienenen "COVID-19 Vaccine Communication Handbook" als "Kommunikationshandbuch zum COVID-19-Impfstoff" - https://sks.to/c19vax-de #COVID-19

    1. The great thing about working with reinteractive is you get to work directly with the developers, which is a huge plus. As a technical founder, I find proxying through a project manager adds unnecessary layers of complexity and creates opportunity for human error.
    1. Like Humpty Dumpty proclaimed in Lewis Carroll's Through the Looking Glass, "When I use a word, it means just what I choose it to mean -- neither more nor less."
    1. If you think you’ve conveyed something but the other person hears something completely different, is that their fault or yours? 
    2. From my perspective the onus is on you to consider not just the words coming out of your mouth, but how they are received.
    3. Everyone has their own background and context that they overlay on top of what they hear. It’s our jobs as communicators to consider that perspective and to adjust the way we communicate accordingly. If we do, we stand a better chance of persuading them to agree with our point of view.
    1. People often hear what they think should be said, not the words that are actually spoken. This comes from the tendency of people to think faster than they talk. A listener makes assumptions about what they expect because their minds race ahead. This can be especially problematic when you misinterpret what your boss said. 
    2. How do you learn to listen more carefully? One good method is to repeat back what you think you heard. When the boss tells you something, don’t just say, “Okay.” Instead, repeat what you heard him tell you. This is called a briefback. Say, “So, you want me to . . .” If your brief back is not what the boss meant, the boss will let you know right then, and you won’t have wasted a lot of effort on the wrong thing. 
    1. AbstractMany organizations are drowning in a flood of corporate bullshit, andthis is particularly true of organizations in trouble, whose managers tend to makeup stuff on the fly and with little regard for future consequences. Bullshittingand lying are not synonymous. While the liar knows the truth and wittingly bendsit to suit their purpose, the bullshitter simply does not care about the truth. Man-agers can actually do something about organizational bullshit, and this ExecutiveDigest provides a sequential framework that enables them to do so. They cancomprehend it, they can recognize it for what it is, they can act against it, and theycan take steps to prevent it from happening in the future. While it is unlikely thatany organization will ever be able to rid itself of bullshit entirely, this article arguesthat by taking these steps, astute managers can work toward stemming its flood
    1. There’s only one hard thing in Computer Science: human communication. The most complex part of cache invalidation is figuring out what the heck people mean with the word cache. Once you get that sorted out, the rest is not that complicated; the tools are out there, and they’re pretty good.
  3. Jan 2021
    1. Refutation trap!PARROTSDON’T JUST REPEAT BACK WHAT THEY SAYWhen Nixon famously said “I am not a crook” it made everyone immedi-ately think “he’s a crook”. Instead, he should have said “I am an honest man”. When we repeat an opponent’s unhelpful position, even to refute it, we are still reinforcing it. IN PRACTICEDON’T SAY “poverty is not natural”.D O S AY “poverty is created”
    1. Ein kurzer Text von Brigitte Nerlich, der—wenn ich es richtig sehe—einige wichtige Elemente ihres Zugangs zur Analyse der Sprache wissenschaftlicher Texte enthält.

    2. Hulme and colleagues set out to reveal patterns of attention and, in particular, patterns of framing6 with regards to how climate change is portrayed in these editorials, and how these patterns are related to wider political and scientific events. The authors identified frames by reading and discussing nearly 500 editorials on climate change (333 in Nature, 160 in Science) published in the two journals between 1966 and 2016, extracted using search terms such as ‘climate’, ‘greenhouse’, ‘carbon’, ‘warming’, ‘weather’, ‘atmosphere’ and ‘pollution’.
    1. Für die Klimakommunikation aber ist es jetzt Zeit für eine Schwerpunktverschiebung: weg von der Frage der Generierung von Aufmerksamkeit, Interesse und Verständnis für das existenzielle Thema und hin zur Kommunikation von Lösungen, zur Beteiligung an Debatten und zur Ermutigung zum Diskurs, zum Engagement – und zum Wandel.
    1. Alle an Klimakommunikation beteiligten Akteure können einen Beitrag leisten, die Debatte immer wieder auf den entscheidenden Punkt zu bringen: Was können wir und insbesondere diejenigen, die in Wirtschaft und Politik Verantwortung tragen, hier und jetzt tun, um die Emissionen von Kohlendioxid und anderen Treibhausgasen einzugrenzen? Die folgenden sechs Empfehlungen sind nicht als Allheilmittel oder Universalrezept gemeint, sondern als Anregung, darüber nachzudenken, wie wir über das Thema Klimawandel kommunizieren. Das zentrale Kriterium effektiver Kommunikation müsste dabei die Frage sein: Bringt das, was wir zum Thema sagen, die Menschen dazu, hier und jetzt über Klimaschutz nachzudenken?
    1. Stephan Lewandowsky. (2021, January 6). The COVID-19 Vaccine Communication Handbook: A practical guide for improving vaccine communication & fighting misinformation https://t.co/3s5JWBvi0m Our new handbook (PDF+living wiki), which helps fighting the spread of misinformation about COVID-19 vaccines. #c19vaxwiki 1/n https://t.co/pRpkcJgVfC [Tweet]. @STWorg. https://twitter.com/STWorg/status/1346969671732490241

    1. However, by the time scientific studies make it to the real world, shortcomings and limitations are removed to present palatable (and often wrong) conclusions to a general audience.
  4. Dec 2020
    1. It seeks to empower us, help us organize, and improve our communication.
    1. Being side by side, instead of separated—and being able to make eye contact, as we now could—worked on the psychology; it made you a little more playful, a little more relaxed.

      Video chat does none of this currently. What's different about looking at each other through a screen? Is it an evolutionary thing, where we just haven't evolved to communicate effectively through video? Sure, we can move information with video chat but can we connect?

  5. Nov 2020
    1. Chevy tried an all-emoji press release about a new car that came across as very forced, proving that less is more when it comes to using emojis in emails. Not to mention, it’s almost impossible to decipher the message they’re trying to communicate.
    1. In Wissenschaft, Politik, Behörden, Medien, Zivilgesellschaft und anderswo - viele Menschen sprechen, schreiben, kommunizieren über den Klimawandel. In unserer Serie stellen wir einige von ihnen vor. Jeden Monat stellen wir dazu einer anderen Person dieselben sechs Fragen. Teil 11: Martha Stangl, Mitarbeiterin des österreichischen Klimaforschungsnetzwerk CCCA und Nebenerwerbslandwirtin
    1. Das Analyse-Unternehmen Vico Research & Consulting untersucht seit 2003 regelmäßig, wie in den sozialen Netzwerken über den Klimawandel debattiert wird. Die Ergebnisse der aktuellen Studie vom ersten Halbjahr 2020 basieren auf über eine Million deutschsprachige Social-Media-Beiträgen, die sich mit dem Thema beschäftigten.

      Diese Studie hat offenbar ein ziemliches mediales Echo gefunden. Rein vorn der Berichterstattung her lässt sich vermuten, dass es sich um ein industriefreundliches PR-Produkt handelt.

  6. Oct 2020