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  1. Last 7 days
  2. Oct 2020
    1. Kommentar in der NYT zu den mörderischen Folgen der Trump'schen Anti-Wissenschaftspolitik. Wir sollten uns nicht zu sehr darüber erheben: Auch die europäischen Regierungen ignorieren konsequent die Erkenntnisse zu den planetaren Grenzen.

    1. Wiki Use that Increases Communication and Collaboration Motivation

      (Click on download full text to read.) Through a cooperative learning assignment, University students responded to a case study that implemented use of a Wiki. Results demonstrate that Wiki is an effective communication and collaboration tool (access, structure, versioning) for all individuals (introvert, extrovert). Recommendations and considerations for use in the learning environment were provided. 6/10

    1. An Evaluation of Problem-based Learning Supported by Information and Communication Technology: A Pilot Study

      (Under "Viewing Options", select PDF.) In this article, Ernawaty and Sujono (2019) summarize results of a study funded by the Research and Higher Education Directorate of Indonesia. The study aimed to evaluate the cogency of information and communication technologies (ICTs) in problem based learning (PBL) and traditional teaching methods (TTM) based upon learner test scores. The concepts of PBL, TTM, and implications of ICTs are briefly reviewed. Results of the study revealed that PBL with the support of an ICT yielded the highest test scores. (6/10)

    1. Scientists can find the latest data and analysis on their areas of research, determine experiments that have already been performed that they don’t need to replicate and find new opportunities for investigation

      "Don't need to replicate"!!! A big part of science is the ability to exactly replicate and double check others' work! We need the ability to do more replication, not less!

    1. High-level bodies such as the US National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine and the European Commission have called for science to become more open and endorsed a set of data-management standards known as the FAIR (findable, accessible, interoperable and reusable) principles.
  3. www.projectinfolit.org www.projectinfolit.org
    1. Major Findings (2:35 minutes)

      I'm quite taken with the variety of means this study is using to communicate its findings. There are blogposts, tweets/social posts, a website, executive summaries, the full paper, and even a short video! I wish more studies went to these lengths.

    1. Because I’m old, I still have my students set up Feedly accounts and plug in the RSS feeds of their classmates and hopefully add other blogs to their feeds as well. And like blogging, I realize only a handful will continue but I want to expose them to the power of sharing their own research/learning via blogging and how to find others who do as well via Feedly.
    1. To further assist students in reading annotated articles, individual annotations are tagged according to a particular “learning lens,” including: glossary, for key terms; previous work; author’s experiments; results and conclusions; news and policy links; connections to learning standards; and also reference and notes.

      I once remarked on the evolution of scientific journal article titles and am surprised that they don’t mention visiting popular science journalism as a means of entering some journal articles from a broader perspective before delving into a journal article itself? They don’t always exist for all articles, but for those with interesting/broad impact they can be a more immediate way into the topic before getting in to the heavier jargon of a scientific article itself.

    1. Unfortunately, there were more cases in 2018 than in 2017 (29 versus 22).

      The numbers and rosy picture here aren't quite as nice as other—more detailed—reporting in the Economist recently would lead us to believe.

      In some sense I do appreciate the sophistication of Bill Gates' science communication here though as I suspect that far more Westerners are his audience and a much larger proportion of them are uninformed anti-vaxxers who might latch onto the idea of vaccine-derived polio cases as further evidence for their worldview of not vaccinating their own children and thereby increasing heath risk in the United States.

    1. the Frauchiger-Renner paper when it first appeared on arxiv.org. In that version of the paper, the authors favored the many-worlds scenario. (The latest version of the paper, which was peer reviewed and published in Nature Communications in September, takes a more agnostic stance.

      I really love it when articles about science papers actually reference and link the original papers!

    1. There are still some wrinkles to be ironed out in getting the various platforms we use today to play well with Webmentions, but it’s a real step toward the goal of that decentralized, distributed, interconnected future for scholarly communication.

      The fun, secret part is that Kathleen hasn't (yet?) discovered IndieAuth so that she can authenticate/authorize micropub clients like Quill to publish content to her own site from various clients by means of a potential micropub endpoint.

      I'll suspect she'll be even more impressed when she realizes that there's a forthcoming wave of feed readers [1] [2] that will allow her to read others' content in a reader which has an integrated micropub client in it so that she can reply to posts directly in her feed reader, then the responses get posted directly to her own website which then, in turn, send webmentions to the site's she's responding to so that the conversational loop can be completely closed.

      She and Lee will also be glad to know that work has already started on private posts and conversations and posting to limited audiences as well. Eventually there will be no functionality that a social web site/silo can do that a distributed set of independent sites can't. There's certainly work to be done to round off the edges, but we're getting closer and closer every day.

      I know how it all works, but even I'm impressed at the apparent magic that allows round-trip conversations between her website and Twitter and Micro.blog. And she hasn't really delved into website to website conversations yet. I suppose we'll have to help IndieWebify some of her colleague's web presences to make that portion easier. Suddenly "academic Twitter" will be the "academic blogosphere" she misses from not too many years ago. :)

      If there are academics out thee who are interested in what Kathleen has done, but may need a little technical help, I'm happy to set up some tools for them to get them started.

  4. Sep 2020
    1. ReconfigBehSci on Twitter: “having spent a few days looking at ‘debate’ about COVID policy on lay twitter (not the conspiracy stuff, just the ‘we should all be Sweden’ discussions), the single most jarring (and worrying) thing I noticed is that posters seem completely undeterred by self contradiction 1/3” / Twitter. (n.d.). Retrieved September 23, 2020, from https://twitter.com/SciBeh/status/1308340430170456064

    1. Nonverbal people hear it all—confessions and complaints, hopes and heartaches.

      Those who speak less often have more time to analyze what another person is saying. They also may notice things and body language that others who are speaking do not.

    2. Conversations about feelings are usually expressed with gestures and proximity, which is difficult while accessing a computer.

      I think that a major part of conversation is those gestures and proximity. With or without a disability this is difficult to express when online.

    3. Speaking fewer quality sentences is more helpful in expressing feeling than an hour of blabber

      People often find that saying fewer words means they are not interested in conversation or want to get speaking over with, but I find the ability to summarize important because it means you completely processed what the person has said. Quality over quantity is an important distinction.

    4. Communication is a two way exchange, speaking and listening.

      I think this is very important and it is relatable to zoom meetings. On zoom, communication is key, but it is not always there. There are many people who do not like to participate, which can hurt our learning. I think that in order for us to completely understand zoom meetings we need both sides of communication.

    5. Communicating with people by using assistive technology is complicated,

      This is very interesting and I wonder how it carries over to zoom technology and if it makes it easier or harder to communicate.

    6. Our technology is like a universal translator, driven by switches, eye gaze, and jerking screen touches.

      Technology has advanced our form of communication rather than weakened it and this is just one example.

    7. Precise word choice is easily overshadowed by eye contact or lack thereof

      if you're not properly and fully engaging in conversation with others, they're not inclined to listen to what you're saying. People respond to your movements and how you interact with them. If you don't display the interest in them and show that you believe in what you're trying to say, they'll stop making an effort to understand.

    8. Our technology is like a universal translator, driven by switches, eye gaze, and jerking screen touches.

      Technology has allowed people with disabilities to communicate without much issue, compared to the past where communication was almost impossible. Technology has greatly improved the lives of those with disabilities.

    1. What is particularly interesting to me is this criticism of technology, especially in the midst of an intense focus on learning new tools—Zoom, Panopto, Slack, Google Meetings, etc—in order to be in closer contact with my students.

      Who do technologies include, and who do they leave out? When we choose a technology, what biases (preferences) are we exposing?

    1. Bonne pratiqueEn 2019, le pôle national de la médiation a créé un espace collaboratif avec le Cnous et la Direction générale de l’enseignement supérieur et de l’insertion professionnelle du ministère (Dgesip) pour traiter rapidement les saisines d’étudiants qui n’arrivaient pas à se faire rembourser la Contribution Vie Étudiante et Campus (Cvec), payée à tort. L’objectif était de mieux communiquer et d’accélérer la procédure de remboursement. Après 6 mois de fonctionnement de cette plateforme, on peut constater une réelle avancée dans les échanges entre la médiation et les Crous et la réalisation des remboursements. Cette initiative, fondée sur la confiance, mériterait d’être étendue, pour le bénéfice de tous, à d’autres problématiques traitées par la médiation.

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    1. mail : pubtv@snptv.org
    2. Afin de mieux promouvoir en télévision un certain nombre de causes sociales, humanitaires et d’intérêt général tout au long de l’année, le Syndicat National de la Publicité TéléVisée (SNPTV) a mis en place pour les associations, ONG et/ou leurs intermédiaires (agences de publicité, agences média) une procédure de traitement de l’ensemble des demandes d’espaces gracieux faites aux grandes chaînes nationales et à leur régie publicitaire.
  5. Aug 2020
    1. Kurzes fact sheet für Journalisten, via Stefan Rahmstorf auf Twitter. Relevant auch als Beispiel für Kooperation von Wissenschaft und Journalismus.

  6. www.youtube.com