69 Matching Annotations
  1. Aug 2022
    1. One problem researchers found with habit trackers is that it creates a “habit dependency” in users: you are only sticking to the habit because of artificial support such as reminders and streak notifications, which help with the repetition of a desired behaviour, but tie the habit to in-app triggers. No app, and the habit is gone. Your habit is tied to ongoing app use.

      I've wondered about this.

    2. In his book The Principles of Psychology, the pioneering philosopher and psychologist William James described living creatures as “bundles of habits”, explaining that developing habits “simplifies the movements required to achieve a given result.”

      The source of the "bundles of habits" quote.

    1. The effort got him accolades and commit access to the Rails repo.

      But having commit access and the having ability to fiddle with bugs are two orthogonal sets of privileges...

  2. Jul 2022
    1. 37:35 - Evolutionary benefits of habits

      learning creates habits - automated, reflexive behavior. The rational, reflective part of the brain is what can mitigate the bad habits.

  3. Jun 2022
    1. James Clear, who writes about habits and decision-making also discusses this. In his book, “Atomic Habits,” he writes about habits in four stages: cues, cravings, responses and rewards.
    1. I find it very very hard to watch the 00:33:35 news read other novels or read nonfiction to be stimulated with ideas I don't read any fiction when I'm writing
    2. lot of people think that writing a novel is 90 percent inspiration and 10 percent perspiration it's actually the reverse 00:02:31 writing a novel is about a routine

      Writing the novel is 90% persipiration (physical and mental routine)

  4. May 2022
  5. Apr 2022
    1. சுவாரசியமான விஷயம் ஒன்றுண்டு, நான் நாவல்களின் முதல் வடிவை ஒருபக்கத் தாள்களில்தான் எழுதுவது. இந்நாவல் விஷ்ணுபுரம் நாவலை தட்டச்சுப் பிரதிசெய்த தாளின் மறுபக்கத்தில் எழுதப்பட்டுள்ளது. அதுவே ஏதோ குறியீடுபோல தோன்றுகிறது.
    1. The law of the "Wild West of Programming" was still held in too high esteem! The same inertia that kept many assembly code programmers from ad- vancing to use FORTRAN is now the principal obstacle against moving from a "FORTRAN style" to a structured style.
  6. Mar 2022
    1. The use of open practices by learners and educators is complex, personal, and contextual; it is also continually negotiated.

      Open practices are, indeed, continually negotiated. This is another way of looking at openness - that doing things in the open leave them in a contingent state. i.e. openness as the opposite of 'closure'. Perhaps then what we need is to create structures for teaching and learning that enable this kind of contingency - the ability to review and re-negotiate what we are doing and how we are doing it? This is a form of metacognitive learning on a personal and organisational level. Each teacher/learner needs to be able to observe the system they are in and negotiate how to change it as they proceed. In my own OEP, I do this, this way:

      "Nonaka’s and Takeuchi’s practical adaptation of ‘Nishida philosophy’ – their SECI model of organisational knowledge creation – proposes everything is implaced within a “ba” (field). Such Ba can be physical or conceptual. We can think of the basho as a shifting context (such as being a student in a University) or set of moving constraints (like the rules of a game). Either way, what we do / what we are is something implaced within a larger field.

      When it comes to learning, a key thing here is to think less not only about how and where we implace ourselves, but equally about what sort of field we are generating. Ba/sho is akin to a habitat; habits develop in relation to specific habitats. If we want to change our habits, we need to also change our habitat. In ‘Nishida philosophy’ subject and object are one, people and environment correlate." Source: Neil Mulholland Build-A-Basho | Thursday 23rd September 2021

  7. Feb 2022
    1. Even though results of these studies are currently under intensescrutiny and have to be taken with a grain of salt (Carter andMcCullough 2014; Engber and Cauterucci 2016; Job, Dweck andWalton 2010), it is safe to argue that a reliable and standardisedworking environment is less taxing on our attention, concentration

      and willpower, or, if you like, ego. It is well known that decision-making is one of the most tiring and wearying tasks...

      Having a standardized and reliable working environment or even workflow can be less taxing on our attention, our concentration, and our willpower leaving more energy for making decisions and thinking which can have a greater impact.

      Does the fact that the relative lack of any decision making about what to see or read next seen in doomscrolling underlie some of the easily formed habit of the attention economy? Not having to actively decide what to read next combined with the random rewards of interesting tidbits creating a sense of flow is sapping not our mental energy, but our time. How can we better design against this?

  8. Jan 2022
    1. For most people, the most efficient method to get a quality paper done is to sit down and write it. Short of a project like a dissertation, most people can handle the organization of an essay without a lot of front-loading.  Predictably, then, kids start resenting being forced to outline for no reason. Ditto studying habits or notetaking; most of my “good” students hate taking notes because … why should they bother? They’re going to remember most of what they actually need to know without having to study, not least of which because they’re more likely to be tested on skills than knowledge.
    1. Only once the second price is being paid do you see any return on the first one. Paying only the first price is about the same as throwing money in the garbage.

      There is something to this.

  9. Nov 2021
    1. The dopamine reward system has also been shown to bestimulated by most drugs of abuse and plays an important rolein addiction [33]. An important question is whether jhanameditators are subject to addiction and tolerance effects thatcan result from stimulation of the dopamine reward system.

      The question of potential addiction to self-induced states that activate the dopamine (and/or other neurochemical) reward system(s) is important. From a more philosophical angle, should we welcome beneficial addictions that, if cultivated, might significantly improve individual and group quality of life? Isn't this related to our high regard for replacing detrimental with positive habits? Habit formation and maintenance also depends on activation of neural reward systems (see Nir Eyal's book, Hooked).

  10. Oct 2021
    1. How are notes to be classified? Famous men have adopted different systems. The best, in the long run, is the system that one has tried, tested by one’s own needs and intellectual habits, and established by long practice.

      This is still solid advice today; advice I have dispensed to others without having seen it written before by others.

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  11. Aug 2021
    1. Habit is the foundation of the routines that comprise the vast bulk of our everyday lives. When we are not disturbed, we live our practical lives without engaging in anything like a cautious assessment of what it is we are doing at any given moment

      Important definition.

  12. Jul 2021
    1. As I went about my morning routine, I picked up the floss and flossed one tooth. I thought to myself, “Well, even if everything else goes wrong today, I’m not a total failure. At least I flossed one tooth.” I smiled in the mirror and said one word to myself: “Victory!”

      This is sort of hilarious but generally true, at least for me.

      I tried something like this ages ago that just involved telling myself to smile 5 times a day to feel better and it made smiling into a fairly regular habit.

    2. Psychologist BJ Fogg is the founder and director of the Behavior Design Lab at Stanford University — he’s coached over 40,000 people in his behavior change methods and influenced countless more. His Tiny Habits method states that a new behavior happens when three elements come together: motivation, ability and a prompt.
    1. and bullet journal for more modern take on commonplace books

      Bullet Journals certainly are informed by the commonplace tradition, but are an incredibly specialized version of lists for productivity.

      Perhaps there's more influence by Peter Ramus' outlining tradition here as well?

      I've seen a student's written version of the idea of a Bullet Journal technique which came out of a study habits manual in the 1990's. It didn't quite have the simplicity of the modern BuJo idea or the annotations, but in substance it was the same idea. I'll have to dig up a reference for this.

  13. Jun 2021
  14. May 2021
    1. Most (95%) students indicated that they found the technique effective, and over half (56%) indicated that they would definitely employ the method in their future studies.

      However, I suspect that without prompting or repeated uses and examples, the percentage of students who actually do is likely abysmally poor.

  15. Mar 2021
  16. Feb 2021
    1. For mobile phones, technologies like SMS, MMS and data access were historically usually considered value-added services, but in recent years SMS, MMS and data access have more and more become core services, and VAS therefore has begun to exclude those services.
    1. To prompt this kind of revolution in your own life, Rose and Ogas suggest creating a micromotive, or a goal tailored to an extremely specific activity that truly inspires you. For example, when Korinne Belock left her job as a political aide to form Urban Simplicity, a firm that declutters and redesigns homes and offices, her micromotive was “organizing physical space.” Note that she didn’t say “doing something creative” or “starting my own business.” Those declarations are too general and fuzzy to be acted on. Instead, she identified a task that sparked within her an outsized amount of curiosity and pleasure and used it as her guide.

      To escape a boring and unfulfilled life, create a micromotive, where we tailor an extremely specific activity that burns the spirit inside you.

  17. Oct 2020
    1. Every goal is doomed to fail if it goes against the grain of human nature.
    2. Whenever you want to change your behavior, you can simply ask yourself: How can I make it obvious? How can I make it attractive? How can I make it easy? How can I make it satisfying?
    3. If a behavior is insufficient in any of the four stages, it will not become a habit. Eliminate the cue and your habit will never start. Reduce the craving and you won’t experience enough motivation to act. Make the behavior difficult and you won’t be able to do it. And if the reward fails to satisfy your desire, then you’ll have no reason to do it again in the future. Without the first three steps, a behavior will not occur. Without all four, a behavior will not be repeated.
    4. Second, rewards teach us which actions are worth remembering in the future. Your brain is a reward detector
    5. The first purpose of rewards is to satisfy your craving
    6. The response is the actual habit you perform, which can take the form of a thought or an action. Whether a response occurs depends on how motivated you are and how much friction is associated with the behavior. If a particular action requires more physical or mental effort than you are willing to expend, then you won’t do it. Your response also depends on your ability. It sounds simple, but a habit can occur only if you are capable of doing it.
    7. Cues are meaningless until they are interpreted. The thoughts, feelings, and emotions of the observer are what transform a cue into a craving.
    8. Every craving is linked to a desire to change your internal state.
    9. Cravings are the second step of the habit loop, and they are the motivational force behind every habit. Without some level of motivation or desire—without craving a change—we have no reason to act. What you crave is not the habit itself but the change in state it delivers.
    10. The cue triggers your brain to initiate a behavior. It is a bit of information that predicts a reward
    11. Your life today is essentially the sum of your habits.
    1. Motivating reflection habits and raising employee awareness of learning

      Michele Rigolizzo, & Zhu Zhu. (2020). Motivating reflection habits and raising employee awareness of learning. Evidence-Based HRM: A Global Forum for Empirical Scholarship, 8(2), 161–175. https://doi.org/10.1108/EBHRM-11-2019-0102

      https://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&AuthType=shib&db=edsemr&AN=edsemr.10.1108.EBHRM.11.2019.0102&site=eds-live&scope=site&custid=uphoenix

      PurposeWhile research has shown reflection is a valuable part of individual learning, developing reflection habits has remained notoriously difficult, particularly for working adults. We explore whether an intervention of being able to review previous reflections will affect employee engagement in future reflection activities and raise their awareness of learning opportunities at work.Design/methodology/approachWe conducted a large-scale field experiment, including 136 employees from an international bank in Europe, in which participants were asked to reflect twice a week for eight weeks. Participants were randomly assigned to either a group that was given access to their previous reflections, or a group that was not.FindingsWe found that individuals who were able to see their previous reflections wrote significantly more subsequent reflections than the other group. In addition, those who could see their previous reflections used more words related to learning and cognition.Practical implicationsOften employees may feel they are only learning when they attend formal trainings. However, this paper provides concrete guidance for how human resources management (HRM) managers can boost employees’ informal learning and awareness of the learning opportunities inherent in challenging work.Originality/valueThis study furthers research on using HRM interventions to facilitate informal learning activities, in particular, methods to motivate systematic reflections and raising awareness of learning opportunities. Our findings suggest that developing habits of reflection and improving awareness of learning opportunities encompasses more than simply writing reflections, but should include processing previous writings.

    1. We rarely, if ever, start with a completely blank file and start writing code. More often that not we start by copying an existing file and then modifying it to get our result.
    2. The reason the bunny theory of code has held up is because of the way software engineers work.
  18. Aug 2020
    1. As a final practical maxim, relative to these habits of the will, we may, then, offer something like this: Keep the faculty of effort alive in you by a little gratuitous exercise every day. That is, be systematically ascetic or heroic in little unnecessary points, do every day or two something for no other reason than that you would rather not do it, so that when the hour of dire need draws nigh, it may find you not unnerved.

      Practice the habit you want to form by little wins every day, however small and unnecessary the battles may seem.

    2. Seize the very first possible opportunity to act on every resolution you make, and on every emotional prompting you may experience in the direction of the habits you aspire to gain. It is not in the moment of their forming, but in the moment of their producing motor effects, that resolves and aspirations communicate the new ‘set’ to the brain.

      The first time you feel an urge to do something in the direction of the habits you want to form, you need to grab it with both hands.

      It's when these emotions produce their first motor effects that we can start solidifying a new normal in our brains.

    3. The more of the details of our daily life we can hand over to the effortless custody of automatism, the more our higher powers of mind will be set free for their own proper work.

      Reminds me of Whiteheads' quote:

      "Civilization advances by extending the number of important operations which we can perform without thinking about them."

  19. Jul 2020
  20. Apr 2020
    1. But I know some of you won’t use LastPass. It’s a little complicated to get started. It only works if it becomes a habit, and it’s hard to change our habits.
  21. Jul 2019
    1. It is not really a trifling effort, as those will discover who have yet to essay it. To “clear” even seven hours and a half from the jungle is passably difficult. For some sacrifice has to be made. One may have spent one’s time badly, but one did spend it; one did do something with it, however ill-advised that something may have been. To do something else means a change of habits. And habits are the very dickens to change! Further, any change, even a change for the better, is always accompanied by drawbacks and discomforts. If you imagine that you will be able to devote seven hours and a half a week to serious, continuous effort, and still live your old life, you are mistaken. I repeat that some sacrifice, and an immense deal of volition, will be necessary. And it is because I know the difficulty, it is because I know the almost disastrous effect of failure in such an enterprise, that I earnestly advise a very humble beginning. You must safeguard your self-respect. Self-respect is at the root of all purposefulness, and a failure in an enterprise deliberately planned deals a desperate wound at one’s self-respect. Hence I iterate and reiterate: Start quietly, unostentatiously.
  22. Feb 2019
    1. It’s the idea that if we do the right things consistently over a long period of time, the future we want becomes more and more inevitable because our actions compound upon one another.

      habits!!

    2. Replace all-or-nothing sprints with a marathon mentality

      habits. suistenable action. not 1 time stuff.

  23. Nov 2018
  24. Jul 2017
    1. What our collaborative learning style empowers and enables is a student's resilience -- how do you look to your neighbor as a resource, how do you test your own theories, how do you understand if you're on the right track or the wrong track?" says Monique DeVane, College Prep's head of school. "It teaches them that it's not just about content; it's about cultivating habits of mind that are the underpinnings of deeper scholarship."

      Collaborative Learning

  25. Nov 2015
    1. people who practice gratitude consistently report a host of benefits: Psychological Higher levels of positive emotions More alert, alive, and awake More joy and pleasure More optimism and happiness Physical Stronger immune systems Less bothered by aches and pains Lower blood pressure Exercise more and take better care of their health Sleep longer and feel more refreshed upon waking Social More helpful, generous, and compassionate More forgiving More outgoing Feel less lonely and isolated.
    2. The next thing that Phil saysin the sort of positivity bias, the notion that gratitude amplifies the good, is thatgratitude counteracts adaptation and habituation.
  26. Oct 2015
    1. Through duration time is ritualized. Bycultivating duration – that is, by doing things over and over – people createsignificant habits and rituals.

      Through duration of time and repeatedly doing things and creating habits are people also creating rhythms?

  27. Sep 2015
    1. before we start our morning, the very first thing we do is think of three things we are grateful for that day. In this TED talk, you will learn the five positive psychology habits that help inoculate your brain against the negative mindsets of others: 1)writing a 2-minute email praising someone you know; 2) writing down three things for which you’re grateful; 3) journaling about a positive experience for two minutes; 4) doing cardio exercise for 30 minutes; or 5) meditating for just two minutes.
  28. Oct 2013
    1. his may seem a trifling matter to mention, but when it is neglected, many faults of pronunciation, unless they are removed in the years of youth, are fixed by incorrigible ill habit for the rest of life.