3 Matching Annotations
  1. Jan 2021
    1. Crux -

      1. Calm plants the seeds of crazy. And also crazy plants the seeds of calm. Basically when times are good, we indulge in it, become complacent about our achievements, become skeptic of the warnings ahead. So, when something bad hits, it's a shock. Similarly crazy plants the seeds of calm, when we are going through a societal shock, we come up with revolutionary solutions, that can help to bring calm for the years to come.
      2. Progress requires optimism and pessimism. Shoot for the stars aim for the moon. Be prepared for the worst, give your best.
      3. People believe what they want to believe, see what they want to see, and hear what they want to hear. Either the model of how I think is wrong, or the other person is wrong. And it is often the latter that people go with, since it is the path of least resistance, both to make changes yourself, and as well as your image.
      4. Important things rarely have one cause
      5. Risk is what you don't see
  2. Jul 2019
    1. It is not really a trifling effort, as those will discover who have yet to essay it. To “clear” even seven hours and a half from the jungle is passably difficult. For some sacrifice has to be made. One may have spent one’s time badly, but one did spend it; one did do something with it, however ill-advised that something may have been. To do something else means a change of habits. And habits are the very dickens to change! Further, any change, even a change for the better, is always accompanied by drawbacks and discomforts. If you imagine that you will be able to devote seven hours and a half a week to serious, continuous effort, and still live your old life, you are mistaken. I repeat that some sacrifice, and an immense deal of volition, will be necessary. And it is because I know the difficulty, it is because I know the almost disastrous effect of failure in such an enterprise, that I earnestly advise a very humble beginning. You must safeguard your self-respect. Self-respect is at the root of all purposefulness, and a failure in an enterprise deliberately planned deals a desperate wound at one’s self-respect. Hence I iterate and reiterate: Start quietly, unostentatiously.
    2. What I suggest is that at six o’clock you look facts in the face and admit that you are not tired (because you are not, you know), and that you arrange your evening so that it is not cut in the middle by a meal. By so doing you will have a clear expanse of at least three hours. I do not suggest that you should employ three hours every night of your life in using up your mental energy. But I do suggest that you might, for a commencement, employ an hour and a half every other evening in some important and consecutive cultivation of the mind. You will still be left with three evenings for friends, bridge, tennis, domestic scenes, odd reading, pipes, gardening, pottering, and prize competitions. You will still have the terrific wealth of forty-five hours between 2 p.m. Saturday and 10 a.m. Monday. If you persevere you will soon want to pass four evenings, and perhaps five, in some sustained endeavour to be genuinely alive. And you will fall out of that habit of muttering to yourself at 11.15 p.m., “Time to be thinking about going to bed.” The man who begins to go to bed forty minutes before he opens his bedroom door is bored; that is to say, he is not living.

      How to handle post work day