452 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
  2. Sep 2019
    1. On social media, we are at the mercy of the platform. It crops our images the way it wants to. It puts our posts in the same, uniform grids. We are yet another profile contained in a platform with a million others, pushed around by the changing tides of a company's whims. Algorithms determine where our posts show up in people’s feeds and in what order, how someone swipes through our photos, where we can and can’t post a link. The company decides whether we're in violation of privacy laws for sharing content we created ourselves. It can ban or shut us down without notice or explanation. On social media, we are not in control.

      This is why I love personal web sites. They're your own, you do whatever you want with them, and you control them. Nothing is owned by others and you're completely free to do whatever you want.

      That's not the case with Facebook, Microsoft, Slack, Jira, whatever.

    1. From quill and ink, to the printing press and book formatting, to digital applications and platforms, annotation is - and always has been - tightly coupled to the technologies of the day.

      This makes me wonder at annotations in scrolls (and how pointers may have worked) prior to the invention and proliferation of codices as a literary form.

  3. Aug 2019
    1. public forum

      What about public forums like G2, Capterra, or Stackshare, how can these be leveraged to share government software insights? Could be framed as open ongoing RFI processes. We should be sharing with each other openly on these platforms. Hope it would at-least improved the level of interfaces / skin vendors put on the same "management" software.

    1. direct quote:"...respondents positively associate health, safety, and the environment with organic farmers compared to conventional and GMO farmers" (Sax and Doran 636). In support of MP#3, Organic farming is better

    1. Debate about online annotation technologies and practices will continue.

      I've added a few examples of abuse and conversation here in the past: https://indieweb.org/annotation#Annotation_Sites_Enable_Abuse

    1. m-health offers predominantly interconnectivity between patients and healthcare professionals while IoT devices offer the ability to collect information and perform procedures with increasingly minimal invasion. Finally, big data gives healthcare professionals an opportunity to spot trends and patterns for both individual patients and groups of patients, improving the speed of diagnosis and disease prevention. In the next section the third and final pillar of Health 4.0; design, is discussed

      Como as tecnologias interagem na Saúde 4.0

    1. But if you think about the ways kids under 15 using digital technology think about writing – you know, writing with text is just one way to write, and not even the most interesting way to write. The more interesting ways are increasingly to use images and sound and video to express ideas (in Koman 2005: n.p.)

      It is fascinating to the mind and this is why I can get caught up "playing around" with technology for hours but it's not satisfying to the soul. The endless possibilities of seeing, watching, reading, and remixing are captivating, and it makes me feel like I'm doing something, but at the end, did I really create anything? It's possible, but I have to remind myself of what I'm really doing online.

  4. Jul 2019
    1. canonical registers.

      The descriptor "canonical" has been very helpful for me to distinguish this data structure from others. Have had a few people think I am talking about something biblical, but it seems to stick. Helps distinguish it from data silos and align it with the other needed components of open standards and APIs.

    1. Further, Humphreys [23] observes that the stabilization that occursduring a technology’s maturation is temporary, and so possibilities for intepretive flexibility canresurface when the context surrounding a technology changes

      Thus the broader "context collapse" for users of Facebook as the platform matured and their surveillance capitalism came to the fore over their "connecting" priorities from earlier days.

  5. May 2019
    1. Use technology

      A pencil is a technology. So is a book. Like @bakerdoylek, I am curious about how the term is used, in this document and in others we read during this experience. In this context, I'm betting they refer to digital tools, possibly internet-based.

    2. modeling forlearners how to select theappropriate tool for their desireduse and skill lev

      I think part of this modeling means asking questions of the technology and talking through the responses to those questions with students. What are questions y'all ask of a technology before deciding to use it with students?

    1. he builds a trail of his interest through the maze of materials available

      Recording the trail we wander through this info seems to be a key feature of the Hypothesis annotation view we return to whenever we open the page.

    2. provide the individual with information-generating aid

      Interesting that there was apparently recognition of the importance of info creation as well as manipulation and consumption.

    3. concepts that we have never yet imagined

      Has this been achieved by people, or have algorithms taken on this task and automated this process beyond our ability to directly interact with these concepts?

    4. Both the language used by a culture, and the capability for effective intellectual activity are directly affected during their evolution by the means by which individuals control the external manipulation of symbols

      As it becomes easier for individuals to manipulate symbols, what happens?

    5. every composite process of the system decomposes ultimately into explicit-human and explicit-artifact processes

      But the increase in efficiency and effectiveness comes from improving the interface so that the relationship between the artifact and the human is easier to manage. A graphical user interface that requires less work on the user's part (even if it required more work for the system programmer) improves those synergies and emergent opportunities. There's an increased benefit when those interfaces can be proliferated widely.

    6. the development of "artificial intelligence" has been going on for centuries

      And the prior evidence is pretty strong for an "emergent" set of new insights and capabilities as these intellectual tools (artificial light, writing, printing, libraries, universities) proliferated.

    7. hope was to make a better match between existing human intelligence and the problems to be tackled

      This seems to echo back to that "aboriginal" example above, where our current seemingly enhanced intelligence derives quite a bit from a circumscribed set of "problems to be tackled" that no longer involve survival, but are more focused on things like making phone calls. Does it matter whether our external "intelligence amplifiers" actually deskill us as humans and make us more dependent on thought-labor-saving technology, as long as we don't lose access to it? Did writing put an end to a rich oral tradition in antiquity? Does Wikipedia and Google search make us more forgetful of "facts"?

    8. synergistic principle gives increased phenomenological sophistication to each succeedingly higher level of organization

      Emergent properties again -- is there an implication that a new (higher?) level of emergence may await?

    9. system is actively engaged in the continuous processes (among others) of developing comprehension within the individual and of solving problems; both processes are subject to human motivation, purpose, and will

      A working definition for education in the digital age?

    10. new innovation in one particular capability can have far-reaching effects throughout the rest of your capability hierarchy

      There's a sense here that some emergent new ability will be discovered once the difficulty of "routine" tasks diminishes.

    11. We find three general categories of process capabilities within a typical individual's repertoire. There are those that are executed completely within the human integument, which we call explicit-human process capabilities; there are those possessed by artifacts for executing processes without human intervention, which we call explicit-artifact process capabilities; and there are what we call the composite process capabilities, which are derived from hierarchies containing both of the other kinds.

      But they shade into each other. Is reading an explicit-human process? What about when a text-to-speech app reads to you? Is that composite? What about when an app keyword-searches a bunch of documents for you and returns only those with the info you want?

    12. even quite different higher order processes may have in common relatively high-order sub-processes

      This must be a useful insight for UI designers.

    13. Every process of thought or action is made up of sub-processes

      Does this focus on the pencil-stroke enhance or detract from the explanation of how to write a document? At what point does this granularity become a detriment?

    14. truly complex situations

      As others have noted here, the idea that the aborigine surviving by her own wits in the outback is tackling less complex situations than the white dude using a telephone seems a bit backwards. A more accurate statement might be that the aborigine does not have the necessary tools and information to build a telephone network. But that's the point, isn't it? That neither do WE. Being the beneficiaries of a technological patrimony and standing on the shoulders of giants doesn't actually make us superior to the aborigine. If anything, it might make us less adaptive and more brittle.

    15. In such a future working relationship between human problem-solver and computer 'clerk,' the capability of the computer for executing mathematical processes would be used whenever it was needed. However, the computer has many other capabilities for manipulating and displaying information that can be of significant benefit to the human in nonmathematical processes of planning, organizing, studying, etc. Every person who does his thinking with symbolized concepts (whether in the form of the English language, pictographs, formal logic, or mathematics) should be able to benefit significantly.

      This is an important suggestion that most thought is symbol manipulation and that computers could be built to assist with it, if not to do it themselves.

    16. considering the whole as a set of interacting components rather than by considering the components in isolation. 1a3

      Considering human supported by smartphone in similar terms as we once considered human supported by library.

    17. extensions of means developed and used in the past

      Do we tend to miss this point, that these new technologies are a continuation of earlier "means" that included language, narrative, writing, printing, libraries, etc.?

    18. a working station that has a visual display screen some three feet on a side; this is his working surface, and is controlled by a computer (his "clerk") with which he can communicate by means of a small keyboard and various other devices

      Here's an example of a state of the art workstation in 1962.

      Tektronix 4014.jpg<br>By The original uploader was Rees11 at English Wikipedia. - Transferred from <span class="plainlinks">en.wikipedia</span> to Commons., CC BY-SA 2.5, Link

    19. different planes here and there, curved surfaces occasionally

      Many new technologies were combined to realize this prescient sentence.

      WaltDisneyConcertHall.jpeg<br>By Jon Sullivan - PDPhoto, Public Domain, Link

    20. can be of significant benefit to the human in nonmathematical processes of planning, organizing, studying, etc.

      I'll be interested to see if this report is entirely Positivist, or if Engelbart recognizes the possibility of computing being weaponized in sectors like politics, economics, security and warfare.

    21. He is designing a building. He has already dreamed up several basic layouts and structural forms,

      I find it interesting how decades of using computers has led to "new methods of thinking and working that allow the human to capitalize upon the computer's help." With all the new technologies, I think the central intellectual development has been to reverse the sequence of design decisions Engelbart describes. Best practice these days is to start with "the people who will occupy this building, and the daily sequences of their activities."

    22. how would our education system change to take advantage of this new external symbol-manipulation capability of students and teachers (and administrators)?

      Let's say it's been twenty years since PDAs have been widely available. I returned to higher education less than ten years ago. K-12 seems to have embraced learning technologies, and their affordances, to improve primary and secondary education. In my experience, few educators with terminal degrees have made the effort while younger and more precarious teachers are slowly adopting educational technologies. Administrators are leading the way with their digital management systems and students are using proprietary social media platforms. Our institutions are doing what they were designed to do: resist change and reproduce the social order. Research paid for with public monies is as quickly privatized as that produced in corporations. Open education practices are just beginning to be explored.

      The first PDA, the Organizer, was released in 1984 by Psion, followed by Psion's Series 3, in 1991. The latter began to resemble the more familiar PDA style, including a full keyboard.[4][5] The term PDA was first used on January 7, 1992 by Apple Computer CEO John Sculley at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas, Nevada, referring to the Apple Newton.[6] In 1994, IBM introduced the first PDA with full telephone functionality, the IBM Simon, which can also be considered the first smartphone. Then in 1996, Nokia introduced a PDA with telephone functionality, the 9000 Communicator, which became the world's best-selling PDA. Another early entrant in this market was Palm, with a line of PDA products which began in March 1996. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Personal_digital_assistant

    23. Other situations might admit changes requiring years of special training, very expensive equipment, or the use of special drugs.

      My reply to another post about historical context might be helpful. https://hyp.is/R07lQCldEem5RmPv1ywB5g/worrydream.com/Engelbart/

    1. Methodology The classic OSINT methodology you will find everywhere is strait-forward: Define requirements: What are you looking for? Retrieve data Analyze the information gathered Pivoting & Reporting: Either define new requirements by pivoting on data just gathered or end the investigation and write the report.

      Etienne's blog! Amazing resource for OSINT; particularly focused on technical attacks.

  6. Apr 2019
    1. The technology stack for web applications mentioned here are not the only ones that you have to choose from. We have tried to bring you the best of the technology stacks for web development that are prevailing in 2019.

      The technology stack for web applications mentioned here are not the only ones that you have to choose from. We have tried to bring you the best of the technology stacks for web development that are prevailing in 2019.

    1. Similar to the technical architecture of classic colonialism, digital colonialism is rooted in the design of the tech ecosystem for the purposes of profit and plunder. If the railways and maritime trade routes were the "open veins" of the Global South back then, today, digital infrastructure takes on the same role: Big Tech corporations use proprietary software, corporate clouds, and centralised Internet services to spy on users, process their data, and spit back manufactured services to subjects of their data fiefdoms.

      Yikes

    1. The underlying guiding idea of a “trustworthy AI” is, first and foremost, conceptual nonsense. Machines are not trustworthy; only humans can be trustworthy (or untrustworthy). If, in the future, an untrustworthy corporation or government behaves unethically and possesses good, robust AI technology, this will enable more effective unethical behaviour.

      yikes

    1. Ashley Norris is the Chief Academic Officer at ProctorU, an organization that provides online exam proctoring for schools. This article has an interesting overview of the negative side of technology advancements and what that has meant for student's ability to cheat. While the article does culminate as an ad, of sorts, for ProctorU, it is an interesting read and sparks thoughts on ProctorU's use of both human monitors for testing but also their integration of Artificial Intelligence into the process.

      Rating: 9/10.

    1. The article, published in Cornell University's React publication, is an overview of technology that is currently being used in the classroom. There is an overview of interactive abilities using these technologies and a conclusion that technology should always be used to enhance and not replace.

      Rating: 6/10. Short.

    1. This article is a breakdown from the U.S. Department of Education around the types of learning environments that exist in the technology arena. It provides examples of schools fulfilling these different environments and offers a collection fo additional resources.

      Rating: 9/10

    1. The author, Susan Grajek, formerly of Yale University is the Vice President for Communities and Research at EDUCAUSE. Grajek brings together 5 leaders in higher education and technology to discuss the future of technology in the higher education arena. The article addresses the progress that needs to be made, especially in the adult education portion of higher eduction and acknowledges that the traditional 18-22 college student population is very small and that there is so much more of the market that needs to be reached.

      Rating: 9/10.

    1. This journal article, written by Amaury Nora, who is currently the Dean for Research at the University of Texas San Antonio and Blanca Plazas Snyder who was pursuing a degree in educational psychology at the time this article as written. The author's bring an honest review of technology and include the benefits, the downfalls and they identify areas where more research needs to be conducted (especially around student persistence).

      Rating: 9/10. The article is informative and takes many perspectives. The only flaw is that when discussing technology in Higher Education, this article is from 2008, but it was also helpful to get the perspective from 10 years ago.

  7. Mar 2019
    1. This paper addresses the question about how today’s modern schools can prepare learners for the future in the age of technology. The response to this question is discussion around innovative learning environments that involve the use of technology. Technology has been a concern for the rapid change in the educational landscape and this paper aims to highlight transformation and innovation in relation to technology for teaching and learning. 9/10 for helpful diagrams and tables.

    1. This paper discusses the idea that design is responsible for developing learning and teaching in technology rich environments. This paper argues Cultural Historical Activity Theory. This paper uses this perspective to discuss their ideas of design in connection with the digital age. This paper is written from the perspective German, Nordic, Russian and Vygotskyan concepts that seek to define the relationship between learning and teaching in relation to design. Rating 9/10 for mixing design with digital learning

    1. This article is about technology integration in the classroom and how to support teachers and schools during the process. It provides recommendations on how to handle distractions and the level of engagement that should be happening between peers. This article takes a deep dive into learning in general and how it prepares students for the real world. Rating: 7/10

    1. At a recent keynote speech (2016), Richard Culatta, former director of the Office of Educational Technology for the US Department of Education, noted that more than half of higher education enrollments for 2016 are nontraditional students.

      Reinventing higher education is essential for diverse learners. A study in 2016 found that more than half of higher education students are "nontraditional students." Meaning they need special accommodations. One essential accommodation of online learning is that students can watch or reread content multiple times if needed. This is in contrast to a traditional classroom where the lecture can only be heard once. Also, while text only information is not for everyone, it is still essential to blind students. But, alternatives such as slide shows must also be present. To add in more technology one must involve administration, staff and faculty before jumping in too quickly.

      Rating 6/10

    1. This article is for teachers and contains multiple resources about how to integrate technology into the classroom and the different types of technology integration. This article is full of examples and ideas teachers can use to facilitate technology in the classroom. Rating: 9/10 for use of examples and practical application.

    1. The use of digital technologies across the adult life span in distance education.

      Research article. This article explores how older and younger student approach studying through the use of technology and reveals that those in older age groups were more likely to use technology in deep in focused ways to study once they got the hang of it and younger groups were more likely to remain on the surface level of a variety of technologies.

    1. Bridging Formal and Informal Learning Through Technology in the Twenty-First Century: Issues and Challenges

      From Springer Link, this is an abstract from a book titled, Bridging Formal and Informal Learning Through Technology in the Twenty-First Century: Issues and Challenges. While the entire content is not here, if purchased, this book/download could offer a large amount of useful information about this topic. It covers learning typically associated with technology such as social networking, game-based learning and digital making.

      Rating 7/10

    2. bridging formal and informal learning through technology in the twenty first century: issues and challenges This article is in a fully online journal. It relates to schools but the learning is by students, not teachers. However, professional development is called for. The article addresses the desired topic in that it refers to social networking and other technology enabled forms of learning; however, it does not seem to be substantive enough to be tremendously helpful. rating 1/1

    1. Educational technology professional development as transformative learning opportunities

      Educational technology professional development can transform learning opportunities. This article focuses on adult learning theory as technology can be "intimidating and frustrating." All of this spiked my interest and I was excited to read more. However, to read more you must purchase the content of the entire article. So, in all this left me disappointed. Rating 2/10

    1. 1Engaging Adults Learners with TechnologyThrough hands-on experience and reviewing the literature, two instruction librarians explore and model best practice

      This article comes from the Twin Cities Campus Library and discusses how to engage adult learners with technology. First, it looks at Kolb's learning model of instructional design which includes that adults must have applying, awakening, practicing and observing. It is also imperative to have hands on learning when it comes to technology. Rating 7/10

    1. Technology Starts with Professional Development and Training

      This EdTech article focuses on the fact that integration of technology MUST start with an emphasis on coaching and teaching teachers first. One district, Calcasieu Parish Public Schools has found that you must, "select technology that supports our learning goals rather than building curriculum around technology." and "We don't put technology into the classroom without first giving hands-on trainings to teachers." Because of the need to train teachers first, there is an entire section of this article devoted to how adults learn! However, this article simply talks about adult learning for educators and how professional development is best during the day to minimize stresses for teachers. Rating 6/10

    1. AMR in 120 Seconds

      This YouTube video is a quick overview of the SAMR model of instruction essential for universal design. "S" stands for substitution - New tech replaces old material but does not change text. "A" stands for augmentation - students work to complete a task such as on google docs. "M" stands for modification - tech is used to redesign part of task and transform learning. Ex. google docs comment feature provides instant feedback. "R" stands for redefinition - design and create new tasks. Ex. communicating across world through google docs, discussing it through google voice and recording it all as presentation. Rating 10/10

    1. Reading on the web is a critical skill for engaging content online. They can be viewed as “exploring,” or “navigating the web.” Just as traditional reading requires knowledge of the text and concepts of print, reading online requires a basic understanding of web mechanics. Good online readers know the tools and strategies that can be used to search for and locate people, resources, and information. They then know how to judge the credibility of these sources.1 The web literacy skills and competencies identified under reading on the web are as follows. Search

      Web Literacy 2.0 discusses how people use web literacy in their everyday lives. For example, "navigating the web" needs to be taught just as the concepts of print do. Quality online readers know where to look, what to ignore, and how to locate information. Writing on the web is also a skill that needs to be explicitly taught. A writer must be able to learn through making and creating. They must be able to communicate their ideas in written word, through presentations as well as through well organized and chosen aesthetics. Rating 10/10

    1. Learning Technologies that Increase the Impact of Classroom Training

      Learning Technologies the Increase the Impact of Classroom Training stresses that with technology the classroom is no longer teacher-centered but rather a more active learning approach that meets the needs of more learners. Technology driven activities to include in teaching are create a blog or wiki, create a podcast or publish students work. All of these offer a great way to engage learners but have changed the environment for the learner significantly. Rating 8/10

    2. Learning Technologies that Increase the Impact of Classroom Training

      Training Industry published this article about some learning technologies that increase the impact of classroom training. These can include class-oriented webpages, multimedia presentations, and activities, as well as web-based scoring systems and supplements. For instance, learners could collectively create a blog or a webcast and use those tools to communicate with each other to help facilitate learning. This is helpful when teaching a technology-fluent group that is excited to do hands-on activities. 6/10

    1. “In the USA, EdTech product catalogues are either too complex for many teachers to use, not objective or comprehensive enough, or not based on credible user reviews (which often have more

      In this article, the author argues that the US can learn something about technology from the rest of the world. Chile, for example, has more cellular phones than the US but is considered a third world country. What can the US learn from this? The ed tech catalogues are too complex and too challenging for teachers to use. The article states, “In the USA, EdTech product catalogues are either too complex for many teachers to use, not objective or comprehensive enough, or not based on credible user reviews (which often have more weight than experimental evidence or product marketing),” states the report, crafted from over 100 interviews with educators, policymakers and entrepreneurs, conducted from September to December 2018." The US also needs to extend access to technology out of the schools and into the homes. There needs to be more groundwork from the US to create a better system. Rating 7/10

    1. This article contains the following sections:Getting Started Integrating Technology Across the Access Spectrum Getting to "Seamless" Integration Tips for Shared Hardware Creating a Professional-Development Plan Hardware and Equipment Using Technology for Feedback and Assessment The Role of Digital Citizenship

      Edutopia presents multiple ways to integrate technology into the classroom efficiently and effectively. The article begins with how to get started. This will help the average teacher create a seamless integration of technology. Then, it moves on to how to use technology across the curriculum, how the school can provide effective professional development to aid in teacher success and how the role of digital citizenship can make or break the effectiveness of the integration.

      Rating 10/10

    1. A Pedagogical Framework for Technology Integration in ESL Classrooms 191is that in an online reading environment designed with embedded compre-hension strategy supports, ELLs’ comprehension gains were significantly associated with their frequency of using coaching avatars that provided sup-port for effective use of reading comprehension strategies (Proctor et al., 2007). Ubiquitous technology environments can arouse student interest in us-ing the technologies (Huang, Huang, Huang, & Lin, 2012; Sandberg, Maris, & de Geus, 2011) and promote better learning outcomes in listening, speak-ing and vocabulary acquisition (Gromik, 2012; Liu & Chu, 2010; Sandberg et al., 2011). Sandberg et al. (2011) observed that when students took home a smartphone to learn English about zoo animals, they were motivated to use it in their spare time, which enabled them to outperform those who did not take the mobile applications home. Technologies designed to adapt to individual learners’ needs have also demonstrated positive effects in promoting learning (Lo, Wang, & Yeh, 2004; Chen & Chung, 2008; Hsu, Hwang, & Chang, 2010; Jia, Chen, Ding, & Ruan, 2012; Wible, Kuo, Chien, Liu, & Tsao, 2001). Lo et al. (2004) used a hypermedia-based English prepositions learning system2 to diagnose students’ errors and provide adaptive remedial instructions, which signifi-cantly improved students’ confidence and learning outcomes. Challenges. The degree of freedom that teachers should give students when students use technology for language learning deserves exploration. Experiments have shown that, when students were free to choose how and when to use CALL, their choices could lead to poor learning and wasted time (Sciarone & Meijer, 1993). Another challenge is that, although learning tools provide easy access to resources, learners may feel overwhelmed by large amounts of information and become passive receivers of knowledge (Schmid, 2008). Easy access to resources can encourage laziness and pas-sivity of learners when it comes to checking materials and exploring knowl-edge themselves.

      This paper exemplifies the technology integration into an ESL classroom. The author has found many great things about using technology to teach her students as well as many challenges associated with it. Some of the positive ways technology has helped her teaching is the student interest in technology, the scaffolds it can provide for these students and how it can adapt to students individual needs. On the flip side, some of the challenges technology presents for this ESL classroom are the initial engagement with technology is short lived, teachers are not trained adequately and there are few guidelines to provide a framework for ESL teachers. Rating 8/10

    1. nontraditional students. The education department at OSU-M is housed within the School of Teaching and Learning and the Integrated Teaching and Learning (ITL) section. The Integrated Teaching and Learning section of the College of Education serves those preservice teachers who are studying to be teachers of children age 3 to Grade 8. The Ohio State University Master of Education degree, the degree that offers course requirements for licensure in elementary and middle childhood, is a five-quarter, graduate licensure program. Students enter the program with a B.A. in Elementary Education or a similar field. We license approximately 24 teachers per year. Class size ranges from 12 through 24 students. During the bachelor’s program, student studies are focused on theories of child development and learning, primary reading and language courses, general liberal arts courses, content courses, and two beginning field courses. At least one field placement during the undergraduate coursework takes place in an urban school. Following admission to the graduate program in education, students begin their coursework in general pedagogy and specific methods: social studies, mathematics, language arts, reading, and science. During this year and a half of studies, students are in the field each week for 4-10 hours and have a 12- to15-day period toward the end of the two methods block quarters when they create and implement lessons in their field classroom. All students complete two separate placements in teams of two. Field placements are primarily in suburban and rural schools. Following these field placements, students have one quarter of student teaching and one quarter for a master’s project, including a comprehensive portfolio and a research paper. Experiences With Technology During the undergraduate program students take one technology course. This course is intended to provide students with exposure to the basic knowledge of computer hardware and an introduction to traditional educational software. During this course, students are required to complete an “All About Me,” project (see Powerpoint 1) for which students familiarize themselves with tools such as the scanner, digital camera, clipart, and presentation software. Figure 1. The technology teaching lab After students are admitted to the master’s licensure program, they take one basic technology course that covers other technologies available to elementary education teachers (e.g., Ellison cutters, laminating machines, filmstrip projectors, video projectors, enlargers), and they continue their development of computer knowledge. The two courses, one in the undergraduate program and the other in the graduate program, are the only two stand-alone courses on technology. After students have completed the basic technology course in the graduate program, they begin their methods courses. Throughout the methods coursework, students are asked to use technology when appropriate to enhance their teaching. In addition to this expectation, instructors of the methods courses integrate technology into their teaching to serve as a model of ways in which technology can enhance learning in the particular subject areas. During the two methods course quarters, students attend a lab course entitled the Technology Teaching Lab (TTL). The goal for this course is to increase the use of technology in students’ lessons in ways that will enhance their teaching. The TTL is a series of 2-hour labs that runs concurrently with our methods blocks. The purpose of this lab is to provide the preservice teachers in our elementary education program opportunities to create, with assistance, technology-enhanced lessons for their field placements. The lab course provides the students with instruction, opportunities, and equipment to take their technology-enhanced lessons directly to the field.

      The Ohio State University is now integrating technology into their Education Master's program. Students are expected as undergraduates to take an introductory technology course. As part of the master's program, students are required to take another technology course. Students are also expected to integrate technology into their two methods courses. To help with this they have a "lab" (which is traditionally thought to parallel science courses) with technology instructors to help them with their methods courses.<br> Instructors are expected to model the technology integration and help students plan a curriculum that integrates technology to aid in the learning of most students.

      Rating 9/10

    1. ommunities using technology in ambitious and innovative ways to support adult learners. Our Beacons’ stories of how they address common challenges show what it takes to develop and scale effective adult learning across multiple partnerships. Through their work at the leading edge of integrating technology into adult learning, we can understand and amplify new models and practices.

      The Beacon Project focuses on ways in which multiple companies have taken to using technology to train adult learners. One example is a company called Access Green. This successful company was started by a wealthy enturpeanur that had been trained at one of the best business schools in the country. He believes that he can provide the same training to the underprivileged through technology. This is his way of giving back and not just helping these people by giving them a job, but rather an education. Rating 7/10

    1. Learning House offered recommendations based on the study's findings. They include: mandatory or incentivized training for instructors who have not taught online. a regular feedback cycle for continuous professional development. a regular feedback cycle for instructor evaluation, including peer feedback. a uniform learning experience for standard components of an online course.

      This article discusses whether or not online professors are assessed and by whom. Nearly 60% of online teachers are never evaluated! Because of this Learning House recommends incentivized trainings, regular feedback/evaluation, professional development and a uniform learning experience with standard components for all online classes. Rating 6/10

    1. Effective Classroom Practices To Transform Education DOI:https://dx.doi.org/10.1787/9789264293243-en Teachers are the most important school-related factor influencing student learning. Teachers can help level the playing field and provide opportunities for success to all their students. They can inspire students to innovate; to think and reflect and to work in collaboration with others.

      This 116 page document includes everything from how to effectively use technology in the classroom to alternative education methods as a lever for teaching innovation. The section I found most helpful was how to effectively use technology in the classroom starting on page 75. Rating 8/10

    1. A New Report: Reimagining the Role of Technology in Higher Education The U.S. Department of Education Office of Educational Technology recently released Reimagining the Role of Technology in Higher Education, a supplement to the 2016 National Education Technology Plan (NETP). The NETP calls for technology-supported, transformational learning in higher education. This vision emphasizes everywhere, all-the-time learning, improved access to learning opportunities, and a level playing field for students with diverse backgrounds. Below is a high-level summary of the report. The first step to achieving this vision is to recognize that higher education is comprised of students of all ages, races, socioeconomic backgrounds and learning abilities. More than 18-year-old high school graduates, new students include returning veterans and single moms. Forty-three percent of students attend part-time and 62 percent work either full-time or part-time. Two-thirds transfer before completing their degree. The student body, and the needs and goals of the student body, have never been so diverse, and higher education has never been more important to those who seek it. Supporting diverse needs and goals requires a student-centered higher education ecosystem that is flexible, integrated and efficient. The NETP believes this new ecosystem must support transformative learning through technology, teaching with technology and assessments enabled by technology. Educators, institutions and educational technology developers should collaborate across institutions to determine the best way to use technology to improve learning outcomes and create new learning experiences and delivery systems. Use data to study how students learn and identify the causes of success and failure. Develop new, standardized tools that enable real-time data analysis. Use digital learning materials to improve access to collaborative and project-based learning, and adopt learning resource design standards for evaluating learning resources. In addition to enhancing student learning experiences, technology and data should be used to improve instructional approaches, develop and implement new, research-based teaching models, and provide academic and non-academic support. Such initiatives must be promoted at the institutional level and include the sharing of information and best practices for various applications. Institutions must also provide training, technical support and professional development opportunities for educators. Assessments enabled by technology should allow for personalization and provide frequent feedback to improve student performance. This will also help faculty better understand and measure student progress. Technology-enabled assessment systems should be open, transparent and auditable, making them less susceptible to fraud and waste. They should create assessment activities that replicate real-world experiences to better prepare students for their careers. Implementing new learning and instructional models and modern assessments requires a robust IT infrastructure. However, this infrastructure must integrate formal, informal, workplace and mobile learning environments to support success for a diverse student body. Student learning and outcome data should be integrated across the higher education ecosystem while meeting security and privacy requirements. Investment decisions should be the result of collaboration between senior administrators, academic leadership and IT. Student feedback should be considered as well. Of course, technological change in higher education requires strong leadership and a culture that promotes collaboration and innovation. A strategic plan should welcome input from educators, students, technology providers, other institutions, and community and economic development organizations. An expanded strategic network can only improve system operability, transparency, innovatio

      Technology is allowing more people of different ages and different cultures to access education. For technology in education to be effective administration needs to offer support and collaboration. Rating 5/10

    1. After a full day of teaching at Boston College, Karen Arnold had to find time to read her students’ contributions to an online discussion board. Each was required to write at least one post, and, as usual, they seemed to have waited to do it until the night before the deadline. “They would just blather something,” said Arnold, who teaches higher education and educational administration. “They didn’t have a conversation. It was more like a hoop-jumping exercise.” That was around 2008, and Arnold has avoided assigning online discussions ever since. Student and instructor at Bronx Community College (Photo by Ryan Brenizer) Like other faculty with memories of failed experiments such as these, she’s pushing back against the widespread notion that technology can necessarily improve teaching and cut costs. “We are fooling ourselves that we’re getting more efficient,” she said. Related: MOOC bandwagon shows signs of slowing down It’s been a high-stakes bet. Universities and colleges are marketing themselves to tech-savvy teenagers while promising higher productivity and financial savings. They will pour $10.4 billion into education technology this year, according to the Center for Digital Education, from computers to in-class gadgets such as digital projectors and wireless “clickers” that let students answer questions electronically. “We are fooling ourselves that we’re getting more efficient.” Karen Arnold, Boston College But professors say they don’t have enough help to use this technology effectively, haven’t seen results from it, and fear that the cost savings administrators keep insisting that technology will bring could mean their own careers are on the line. That’s left many in the university ranks rolling their eyes when the next “innovation” pops up. “We’ve been hearing over the last four or five years that technology is going to reduce costs, increase quality and increase access,” said Diane Harley, director of the Higher Education in the Digital Age project at University of California, Berkeley. She doesn’t think it can do all three of those things. “I always say, pick two.” Not that professors have completely resisted the trend. Nearly 75 percent have tried a new technology in their classes in the past year, according to a survey of 1,600 of them by Faculty Focus, a newsletter that shares effective teaching practices. Yet 34 percent said keeping up with technology was either “moderately” or “very” problematic. Related: As online courses expand, so do questions about ownership One of the most common complaints from faculty is that much of this technology creates more work, not less, a survey of 42 professors by David R. Johnson, a sociology researcher at Rice University, found. One of the reasons for this inefficiency is that professors adopt educational technology from companies that market it to them directly, even when their universities aren’t equipped to troubleshoot or upgrade it, said Gary W. Matkin, dean of continuing education, distance learning, and summer session at the University of California, Irvine. Then, when something even better comes along, faculty and universities chase after that. “It produces this technology war,” said Matkin. He thinks more universities will eventually switch to the model used by many corporations in which only certain technology is allowed. That way they’ll be better able to manage it — and track the results. Related: Want higher-ed reform? You may be surprised where you’ll find it Many schools have used this model to adopt the wireless clickers — or “student response systems” — in large classrooms. Allowing students to use the TV remote-style clickers to collectively answer questions can keep them engaged in lecture classes, according to a study at Canisius College, which found that student grades increased by 4.7 percent in classes that used clickers. But the technology’s impact goes only so far. In another study released this year, by Butler University professor Juan Pablo Rodriquez Prieto, language students who took clicker-based quizzes performed about 4.5 percent worse than classmates who used pencil and paper. Clare O’Connor, a Boston College biology professor who teaches several large classes and uses clickers regularly, agrees that they have limitations. She doesn’t use them for quizzes or tests, she said. “I like students to have the opportunities to change their answers,” she said. “If students have to answer when a question appears on the screen, you eliminate the possibility of more reflective answers.” One way schools have tried to lower the cost of education is by using another kind of technology: online courses. Yet even after teaching English online for 15 years, Wright State University-Lake Campus’ Martin Kich believes in-person courses offer students far more. Related: Colleges take cues from private business to improve their customer service He said he has to assign what he calls “busy work” to online classes simply to check that students are completing assignments, since there’s no opportunity to gather and discuss. “Academically, they are very suspect,” Kich said of online courses. Instead of lectures, online courses often use PowerPoint to present material. But studies have found that students, when given the ability to see lectures via PowerPoint — both online and in person — slack on doing their own assigned reading. “Students perceive the teachers will highlight all of the material worth considering in the textbook,” University of Central Missouri professor Thomas M. Mitchell wrote in a study of the use of PowerPoint in classes. “Unfortunately, students accept this efficient and time-saving system as a normal way of learning and disregard reading as an effective method of acquiring information.” As for Arnold, she abandoned discussion boards until her university upgraded to Canvas — an online learning management system — and encouraged professors to use it starting this year. After getting student feedback, she assigned two students to moderate the discussion board each week, filling it with questions that would drive conversation. At the start of class, the two students recap the results, saving Arnold the need to keep daily tabs on the board. “The good and bad thing about technology is it will do anything,” she said. But “you have to have time at the expense of other things you could be doing to figure it out.”   This story was produced by The Hechinger Report, a nonprofit, independent news website focused on inequality and innovation in education. This article was originally published on The Heching Report and authored by Ryan Derousseau. Read the original article. Spread the love

      Technology has been found to be more of a hindrance in higher education that a help. Professors claim that students are simply doing the minimal amount of work to get by and online discussions are inefficient. This is making our education system less engaging and with less learning.

    1. Laboratory activities and constructivism are two notions that have been playing significant roles in science education. Despite common beliefs about the importance of laboratory activities, reviews reported inconsistent results about the effectiveness of laboratory activities. Since laboratory activities can be expensive and take more time, there is an effort to introduce virtual laboratory activities. This study aims at exploring the learning environment created by a virtual laboratory and a real laboratory. A quasi experimental study was conducted at two grade ten classes at a state high school in Bandung, Indonesia. Data were collected using a questionnaire called Constructivist Learning Environment Survey (CLES) before and after the laboratory activities. The results show that both types of laboratories can create constructivist learning environments. Each type of laboratory activity, however, may be stronger in improving certain aspects compared to the other. While a virtual laboratory is stronger in improving critical voice and personal relevance, real laboratory activities promote aspects of personal relevance, uncertainty and student negotiation. This study suggests that instead of setting one type of laboratory against the other, lessons and follow up studies should focus on how to combine both types of laboratories to support better learning.

      In this peer-reviewed study, two tenth-grade classes were analyzed as they used either a virtual or a real laboratory to accomplish learning tasks. The question raised was whether a real or a virtual laboratory was more conducive to constructivist learning. The study concluded that a real lab is better than a virtual one to trigger constructivist learning. This is of importance to me because I teach adults about software in both virtual and real laboratories, and when I develop content, I try to use the constructivist theory as much as possible as I find it works best for my audience, in addition to making novel content more relatable. Please note: I could not put the annotation on the text because the paper opened in a popup page that does not work with Hypothes.is. 7/10

    1. How to Design Education for Adults

      This wonderful how-to by Southern New Hampshire University provided several well explained tips about what adults need in their learning environments, including their own learning theory, goals, relevant instruction, treatment by the teacher, and participation. These are important things to keep in mind when training working adults because it may have an impact on what information is offered and how it is presented. I will use the information in this article later to help me present content in a meaningful way for my working adult learners. I want the content to be as relevant and inviting to them as possible. 9/10

    1. 6 Effective Strategies for Teaching Adults

      This article from Point Park University provides several methods one can use to help educate adults. Ideas presented include ensuring content is relevant, knowing the audience, igniting emotion in the audience, ensuring assignments are attainable, and providing constructive feedback. I find these especially helpful because of my work, which often involves teaching adults who are busy and sometimes uninterested in my content. The section that will help me most is "Encourage Exploration." Because I'm training on a software tool, I want learners to go into the software and make mistakes and learn from them. I want them to poke around! It can be difficult to convince a class of disgruntled 60-year-old men who are mad that things are changing to go play with a complex software tool like children. 7/10

    1. Adults & Learning: How to Provide for Working Professionals

      The Digital Marketing Institute published this article to help those who provide training for professional adults. It echoes a lot of what I've read in other articles about teaching adults: The goals are different, and they have different needs from the instructor than children do. I liked that this article mentioned that many professional adults find technology to be a barrier, but I wish there were more information about it. The article discussed several of the biggest challenges for adult learners, which was a nice change from the quintessential adult learner article that focuses on what learners need. I also want to know what they don't need. Some of the barriers to learning include a lack of time, responsibilities, financial stressors, fear of technology, and trouble identifying the ideal learning path. 8/10

    1. Training Older Adults To Use New Technology

      This article, published in the Journals of Gerontology, discusses a study that focused on teaching older adults to use technology. This is often discussed in a practical sense, with many how-to's. This article, however, discusses the theory behind gerontological learning. Older adults don't generally learn the same way younger adults do. Therefore, it is important to provide them with practice that shows tasks have continuity, to ensure the important task components are focused on strongly, and to consider whether the learning goals are appropriate for the learner. Representative design is addressed here. This is the first time I've heard of representative design. I teach many people over the age of 60 to use technology, so it is important for me to know the theory that will help them learn best. Interestingly,this article mentioned that performance should be assessed based on a comparison of the older adult's environment. I wish I could use that more in my work, but it's a young person's world now. 9/10

    1. Effective Integration of Technology and Instructor-Led Training to Promote Soft Skills Mastery

      The Access Technologies Group published this article to discuss purposeful use of technology in ILT environments whose goal was to teach soft skills. The article claims that blended learning is the ideal delivery technique because it provides the ease of e-learning with the face-to-face time necessary to develop soft skills. It is critical to the success of the training program to integrate e-learning and ILT seamlessly to ensure the two produce synergy without limiting themselves or each other. It is also important that the learners are provided with an environment that suits their learning needs best. Technology and ILT can both provide ways to meet those needs, and where one lacks, the other can fill in. 8/10

    1. Teaching with technology

      The University of Wisconsin - Madison published this helpful, quick guide to assist instructors in using technology to teach others. It discusses some of the technology available to help teach, including Microsoft products, Blackboard, Kaltura, and others. It also discusses some of the tools the school uses to facilitate blended learning. This includes Google Apps, technology-equipped classrooms, and a Quality Matters subscription that helps produce high-quality blended learning products. It is important to incorporate technology in the classroom because it helps to facilitate learning and engage learners. 5/10

    1. designing for sustainable mobile learning: evaluating the concepts formal and informal This is a journal article that is freely available online. They argue that informal learning is more 'enriching' than formal learning. They write about mLearning (mobile learning) and state that some 'design aspects' must be left to learners. This is formatted in the standard way and has the usability one would expect of an online journal article. There are citations as one would expect but I am not qualified to evaluate the information quality. rating 5/5

    1. This article explains just in time learning (such as that which can be done via devices) within the context of higher education. My interest is in public health education, but at this moment, I am not sure how much I can narrow in on that topic, so I will save this for now. This is obviously not a scholarly article but is of some interest nonetheless. rating 2/5

    1. This is specific to Articulate Rise 360 (a rapid development tool) and features brief posts that keep the reader up to date on software changes, which are made frequently. Only a portion of each comment is visible on the main page (just as only a portion of an email is visible without clicking the email) but the subject heading is usually sufficient to describe the content of the post. rating 3/5

    1. This is associated with the e-learning development tool "Articulate Storyline." There are frequent blog posts and they are not limited to or exclusive to the Articulate products. Posts are brief and not all of the content will be new, but there are worthwhile tips to be had and they combine theory (not to the extent that an academic would) with practice. rating 3/5

    1. This page, Top Tools for Learning, is updated every year. It lists and briefly describes the top tech tools for adult learning. For the current (2018) list, they are YouTube, PowerPoint, and Google Search. The list proceeds through the top 200 and there are links to each tool. The purpose of this page is to list them; tutorials, etc. are not offered. Rating 4/5

    1. New Media Consortium Horizon Report This page provides a link to the annual Horizon Report. The report becomes available late in the year. The report identifies emerging technologies that are likely to be influential and describes the timeline and prospective impact for each. Unlike the link to top learning tools that anyone can use, the technologies listed here may be beyond the ability of the average trainer to implement. While it is informative and perhaps a good idea to stay abreast of these listings, it is not necessarily something that the average instructional designer can apply. Rating: 3/5

    1. 7 things you should know about This page offers two lists of technologies. One relates to learning technologies and the other to campus IT. In either case, one clicks "see all" and is shown a list of many up and coming technologies. One can click the links to get a discussion of seven things the user should know about these technologies. Reports are two pages and follow a set format that includes a brief story or illustration. These introduce the visitor to the use of the technology but do not provide extensive explanation; it is an introduction. Technologies listed on these pages are often but not always technologies that the average instructional designer may put to use. Rating: 3/5

    1. Campus Technology magazine This is the website for a magazine that is also published on paper. Articles are freely accessible (a subscription is not required). The design of the page is messy and as with any magazine, the content varies, but the site does give a description of the use of technology in higher education. The same technologies can sometimes be applied in adult learning in general. Rating 4/5

    1. ISPI offers a variety of publications, from its member-exclusive monthly and quarterly journals, "Performance Improvement Journal and Performance Improvement Quarterly,"

      International Society for Performance Improvement This is the web page of the professional association. It is similar to other professional association web pages. Some content is available only to those with a membership; individuals must log in. There are links to the publications. These include Performance Improvement Journal, Performance Improvement Quarterly, Performance Xpress. Some features of the website can become a bit difficult to drill down to but there are sometimes job aids and other immediately usable content available. This topic relates to shaping performance of adult employees on the job. Rating: 4/5

    1. Behavior Engineering Model This page has a design that is not especially attractive or user friendly but it does provide an overview of Gilbert's Behavior Engineering Model. This is a model that can be used to analyze the issues that underlie performance. A six-cell model is presented. Rating 5/5

    1. Human Performance Technology Model This page is an eight page PDF that gives an overview of the human performance technology model. This is a black and white PDF that is simply written and is accessible to the layperson. Authors are prominent writers in the field of performance technology. Rating 5/5

    1. Edutech wiki This page has a somewhat messy design and does not look very modern but it does offer overviews of many topics related to technologies. Just like wikipedia, it offers a good jumping off point on many topics. Navigation can occur by clicking through categories and drilling down to topics, which is easier for those who already know the topic they are looking for and how it is likely to be characterized. Rating 3/5

    1. This link is for the Association of Information Science and Technology. While many of the resources are available only to those who are association members, there are a great many resources to be found via this site. Among the items available are their newsletter and their journal articles. As the title suggests, there is a technology focus, and also a focus on scientific findings that can guide instructional designers in the presentation and display of visual and textual information, often but not exclusively online. Instructional designers are specifically addressed via the content of this site. A student membership is available. Rating 5/5

    1. While some of these sharing models might have resulted from a need for frugal spending after the global economic recession of 2008, their success was also driven by a growing environmental consciousness combined with the ubiquity of Internet and associated information and communi-cation technologies which make sharing possible at scale.

      talks about how the internet and technology have helped in the expansion of the sharing economy.

    Tags

    Annotators

    1. Strategy Exchange

      When students share what they found with each other, they are helping each other to find more information.

      By figuring out what is the best out of all the MP3 players, they are comprehending the information that is being presented on each website.

      Collaborating with each other to boost their comprehending skills.

    1. In a field such as technology, in which time does not march so much as it whizzes by, the freshness test is understandable.
  8. Feb 2019
    1. Teachers in the substitution and augmentation phase can use technology to accomplish traditional tasks,  but the real learning gains result from engaging students in learning experiences that could not be accomplished without technology. At the Modification and Redefinition level, the task changes and extends the walls of the classroom

      Using the whole SAMR model can help our students to use autonomy to learn information and helps us to differentiate their learning experiences.

    2. Researchers have determined that technology integration typically moves through specific levels. The higher the level of an activity the greater the educational benefit.

      The more technology is integrated into our lessons, the more learning will occur. It is important to remember that technology helps us to make content more relatable and interesting to our students.

    1. Each situation presented to teachers is a unique combination of these three factors, and accordingly, there is no single technological solution that applies for every teacher, every course, or every view of teaching. Rather, solutions lie in the ability of a teacher to flexibly navigate the spaces defined by the three elements of content, pedagogy, and technology and the complex interactions among these elements in specific contexts

      Every teacher is student and every group of students are different. The way to use this information is to base it on how we teach the best and how our students learn the best. There is no "right" or "wrong" way but there are many different ways that work for different teachers and students

    2. Instead, TPACK is the basis of effective teaching with technology, requiring an understanding of the representation of concepts using technologies; pedagogical techniques that use technologies in constructive ways to teach content; knowledge of what makes concepts difficult or easy to learn and how technology can help redress some of the problems that students face; knowledge of students’ prior knowledge and theories of epistemology; and knowledge of how technologies can be used to build on existing knowledge to develop new epistemologies or strengthen old ones.

      Using technology to incorporate content knowledge and teaching strategies in our lessons will help students to better understand the information that we are trying to teach them.

    3. A teacher with deep pedagogical knowledge understands how students construct knowledge and acquire skills and how they develop habits of mind and positive dispositions toward learning

      (Maybe use this quote). Understanding students and how they learn helps us to incorporate technology and teach content so that they can get a full understanding of what we are trying to teach.

    4. Equally important to the model are the interactions between and among these bodies of knowledge, represented as PCK, TCK (technological content knowledge), TPK (technological pedagogicalknowledge), and TPACK

      The interaction of all three areas is important because it will help us to understand technology when it comes to lesson planning and content knowledge. Knowing what types of technology to use based on our pedagogical methods and the content that we are teaching our students will help us to implement them to ensure full understanding from our students.

    5. At the heart of good teaching with technology are three core components: content, pedagogy, and technology, plus the relationships among and between them. The interactions between and among the three components, playing out differently across diverse contexts, account for the wide variations seen in the extent and quality of educational technology integration

      Incorporating technology on its own will not be helpful to us when we are teaching. We must also base what tools we use around the content that we are teaching, our teaching methods and ability to differentiate a lesson, and the type of technology we are trying to incorporate. Technoology is useful when used correctly and wisely, so when we lesson plan, we must think about these before implementing our instruction.

    6. There is no “one best way” to integrate technology into curriculum. Rather, integration efforts should be creatively designed or structured for particular subject matter ideas in specific classroom contexts

      We should find ways to incorporate technology based on the content that we are teaching, the students' abilities in our classes, and our understanding of the technology that we are using. If we don't understand a certain technology or it doesn't relate to what we are teaching or the technology is too advanced for our students then incorporating the technology will be unuseful in our lessons.

    7. Furthermore, teachers have often been provided with inadequate training for this task. Many approaches to teachers’ professional development offer a one-size-fits-all approach to technology integration when, in fact, teachers operate in diverse contexts of teaching and learning

      Technology is always changing, how will we keep up with the changes and how will we incorporate tools that we are unsure about? It is understandable that in college, we learn about the current technology of that time, but it is our responsibility to understand that technology will always change and that we should try to keep up-to-date on what tools we can use to teach our lessons.

    8. Understanding how these affordances and constraints of specific technologies influence what teachers do in their classrooms is not straightforward and may require rethinking teacher education and teacher professional development

      We must continue to learn new information and about new technologies so that we can better teach our students. Professional development can help us to understand the problems that can arise when using technology so that we can easily work through them when they do happen.

    9. Rather, particular technologies have their own propensities, potentials, affordances, and constraints that make them more suitable for certain tasks than others

      How will we use these technologies to help our students learn even though they will have problems that come along with it? How can we make sure that we limit the amount of problems that will occur in our lessons?

    1. first draft could represent a free outpouring of thoughts

      This paragraph outlines a truly augmented way of writing that cannot happen using paper. To me noting on paper has changed purpose. Sometimes it is an echo noting of a quote, a key word, a diagram. It is closer to drawing. But writing as thinking out loud, writing as trying to make sense...that is tech aided. I am sure my mind changes its processimg focus depending on whether I face a screen or a copybook. Just as you shift perspective when you watch through a camera lens to take a good pic...you see more.

    1. A.T.E.’s Concentrated Solar Thermal system has provided solutions for commercial and industrial applications. Solar thermal technology is used in it which uses solar energy from the sun. This technology directly impacts costs and increase your savings by being energy-efficient. The system also has many benefits like easy to install, longer life cycle, user friendly etc.

    1. Would you rather trust a human legal system or the details of some computer code you don't have the expertise to audit?

      A corollary question might be, if the legal system and code of laws have gotten so highly specialized that they require specialists to navigate them, are you trusting a "human" system or a technology? (With the answer including the fact that humans being involved at all is different from a machine-implemented algorithm, even if human decisions are constrained by the legal "algorithms.")

    1. This process helps avoid the common problems of treating the textbook as the curriculum rather than a resource, and activity-oriented teaching in which no clear priorities and purposes are apparent

      Making our own lesson plans and using the textbook as a resource. Integrating technology can help to shy away from using the textbook as the backbone of our lesson plans.

    1. malleable

      get the multiple and dynamic…but what does malleable mean here?

      Of the three…this is the most interesting to me. Does it mean that we'll see opportunities for student work process/product be a bit more portable, transferrable, remixable? If so…sign me up. :)

    2. among members of particular groups

      Wondering how much a focus on "in the classroom" limits us as I believe most learning contexts in the future will be outside of traditional classroom settings. Also thinking about power structures in these contexts.

    3. continued evolution

      Wondering how far we (and NCTE) would like to push/advocate for "evolution" of curriculum, assessment, & teaching. I've been thinking lately (as per guidance from Gerber & Lynch) that we need to really problematize and reinvent these elements. Thinking about more digitally native pedagogies (and assessments, practices, etc.) as opposed to digitizing the traditional.

      An example would be considerations of computational thinking/participation in theoretical perspectives, or authentic assessments using API data or a tool like Hypothesis.

  9. Jan 2019
    1. machine intelligence

      Interestingly enough, we saw it coming. All the advances in technology that lead to this much efficiency in technology, were not to be taken lightly. A few decades ago (about 35 years, since the invention of the internet and online networks in 1983) people probably saw the internet as a gift from heavens - one with little or any downsides to it. But now, as it has advanced to such an extreme. with advanced machines engineering, we have learned otherwise. The hacking of sites and networks, viruses and malware, user data surveillance and monitoring, are only a few of the downsides to such heavenly creation. And now, we face the truth: machine intelligence is not to be underestimated! Or the impact on our lives could be negative in years to come. This is because it will only get more intense with the years, as technology further develops.

    1. but is ever present in the world of educational technology

      I've tried in vain to find an article I read in the recent past about how only a small percentage of educational technology products are effective in improving student achievement. I also enjoyed this article/chart, which illustrates how technology is a TOOL, not the method: https://www.iste.org/standards/for-students

    1. 21st Century Skills (21C Skills)

      A focus on 21st Century Skills.

    2. reach and meet the growing number of diverse audiences using the web

      Important to focus on diverse audiences globally.

    1. Portfolio School is a project-based start-up school in New York's Tribeca neighborhood, which emphasizes guided choice and a personalized education, mixing technology with learning activities.

      Emphasis on personal choice and technology

    1. the calcu-lation of uses and applications that might be made of the vastly increased available means in order to devise new ends and to elimi-nate oppositions and segregations based on past competitions for scarce means. (24)

      Does this sound like Mark Zuckerberg's idealism before it devolved into a data-mining project in the service of neoliberal economics?

    1. A creative communicator expresses themselves clearly and concisely through digital media

      It is sometimes difficult to interpret what someone is saying through technology, so it is important to be fully aware of how and what you are saying to people through technology.

    2. To be a computational thinker, ISTE says students must be able to create and employ strategies for solving problems that use technology
    3. It also requires students to learn solution design, meaning they have to diagnose problems, prescribe solutions, and even make those solutions with digital tools

      Learning how to deal with problems digitally can help students to learn how to work out problems in their daily lives and even other areas of technology.

    1. – long distance calls were expensive.

      Mobile phone companies have now abolished roaming chargers in Europe meaning you can call any other countries in Europe as the same price as a local call.

    2. Only television rivals the mobile device in its speed of adoption by the American people.

      I wonder has the sales of televisions decreased since the introduction of mobile phones, tablets and laptops, where many people view tv online or on streaming sites such as Netflix

    3. How do you like being interrupted at dinner or while making love? How do you like it when your boss phones you just before you fall asleep?

      This problem must relate to a house phone which seems quite dated now as many people, in particular younger generations just use mobile phones now which come with handy settings such as silent, night mode and aeroplane mode!

    1. Theseunderstandings of spatial technologies build on les-sons from science and technology studies (STS)research that describes the processes by which dataand technologies come to assume and reify social andpower relations, worldviews, and epistemologies(Feenberg1999; Pinch and Bijker1987; Wajcman1991; Winner1985)

      Good summation of Bijker's and Winner's STS work

    1. The Victorian periodical The Westminster Review wrote that the introduction of gas lamps would do more to eliminate immorality and criminality on the streets than any number of church sermons.
  10. Dec 2018
    1. In her lifetime, my grandmother journeyed from a world confined to her immediate physical community to one where she now carries out video conversations over the internet with her grandchildren on the other side of the world, cheaply enough that we do not think about their cost at all. She found her first train trip to Istanbul as a teenager—something her peers would have done rarely—to be a bewildering experience, but in her later years she flew around the world. Both the public sphere and our imagined communities operate differently now than they did even a few decades ago, let alone a century.

      It's nice to consider the impact of the technologies around us and this paragraph does a solid job of showing just that in the span of a single generation's lifetime.

    2. Te c h nolo-gies alter our ability to preserve and circulate ideas and stories, the ways in which we connect and converse, the people with whom we can interact, the things that we can see, and the structures of power that oversee the means of contact.
    1. became so efficient in offices that they killed off the need for most of the old-fashioned secretarial skills Ms. Berezin was trying to enhance.

      Ironic. Unintended consequences.

  11. Nov 2018
    1. 2.1.1 Cognitive and psycholinguistic theories of SLA One of the main theoretical frameworks on the cognitive side is the input–interactionist paradigm (Long, 1996), and the early research on online interaction in FL/SL contexts focused on the development