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  1. Last 7 days
    1. bridging formal and informal learning through technology in the twenty first century: issues and challenges This article is in a fully online journal. It relates to schools but the learning is by students, not teachers. However, professional development is called for. The article addresses the desired topic in that it refers to social networking and other technology enabled forms of learning; however, it does not seem to be substantive enough to be tremendously helpful. rating 1/1

    1. designing for sustainable mobile learning: evaluating the concepts formal and informal This is a journal article that is freely available online. They argue that informal learning is more 'enriching' than formal learning. They write about mLearning (mobile learning) and state that some 'design aspects' must be left to learners. This is formatted in the standard way and has the usability one would expect of an online journal article. There are citations as one would expect but I am not qualified to evaluate the information quality. rating 5/5

    1. This article explains just in time learning (such as that which can be done via devices) within the context of higher education. My interest is in public health education, but at this moment, I am not sure how much I can narrow in on that topic, so I will save this for now. This is obviously not a scholarly article but is of some interest nonetheless. rating 2/5

    1. This is specific to Articulate Rise 360 (a rapid development tool) and features brief posts that keep the reader up to date on software changes, which are made frequently. Only a portion of each comment is visible on the main page (just as only a portion of an email is visible without clicking the email) but the subject heading is usually sufficient to describe the content of the post. rating 3/5

    1. This is associated with the e-learning development tool "Articulate Storyline." There are frequent blog posts and they are not limited to or exclusive to the Articulate products. Posts are brief and not all of the content will be new, but there are worthwhile tips to be had and they combine theory (not to the extent that an academic would) with practice. rating 3/5

    1. This page, Top Tools for Learning, is updated every year. It lists and briefly describes the top tech tools for adult learning. For the current (2018) list, they are YouTube, PowerPoint, and Google Search. The list proceeds through the top 200 and there are links to each tool. The purpose of this page is to list them; tutorials, etc. are not offered. Rating 4/5

    1. New Media Consortium Horizon Report This page provides a link to the annual Horizon Report. The report becomes available late in the year. The report identifies emerging technologies that are likely to be influential and describes the timeline and prospective impact for each. Unlike the link to top learning tools that anyone can use, the technologies listed here may be beyond the ability of the average trainer to implement. While it is informative and perhaps a good idea to stay abreast of these listings, it is not necessarily something that the average instructional designer can apply. Rating: 3/5

    1. 7 things you should know about This page offers two lists of technologies. One relates to learning technologies and the other to campus IT. In either case, one clicks "see all" and is shown a list of many up and coming technologies. One can click the links to get a discussion of seven things the user should know about these technologies. Reports are two pages and follow a set format that includes a brief story or illustration. These introduce the visitor to the use of the technology but do not provide extensive explanation; it is an introduction. Technologies listed on these pages are often but not always technologies that the average instructional designer may put to use. Rating: 3/5

    1. Campus Technology magazine This is the website for a magazine that is also published on paper. Articles are freely accessible (a subscription is not required). The design of the page is messy and as with any magazine, the content varies, but the site does give a description of the use of technology in higher education. The same technologies can sometimes be applied in adult learning in general. Rating 4/5

    1. ISPI offers a variety of publications, from its member-exclusive monthly and quarterly journals, "Performance Improvement Journal and Performance Improvement Quarterly,"

      International Society for Performance Improvement This is the web page of the professional association. It is similar to other professional association web pages. Some content is available only to those with a membership; individuals must log in. There are links to the publications. These include Performance Improvement Journal, Performance Improvement Quarterly, Performance Xpress. Some features of the website can become a bit difficult to drill down to but there are sometimes job aids and other immediately usable content available. This topic relates to shaping performance of adult employees on the job. Rating: 4/5

    1. Behavior Engineering Model This page has a design that is not especially attractive or user friendly but it does provide an overview of Gilbert's Behavior Engineering Model. This is a model that can be used to analyze the issues that underlie performance. A six-cell model is presented. Rating 5/5

    1. Human Performance Technology Model This page is an eight page PDF that gives an overview of the human performance technology model. This is a black and white PDF that is simply written and is accessible to the layperson. Authors are prominent writers in the field of performance technology. Rating 5/5

    1. Edutech wiki This page has a somewhat messy design and does not look very modern but it does offer overviews of many topics related to technologies. Just like wikipedia, it offers a good jumping off point on many topics. Navigation can occur by clicking through categories and drilling down to topics, which is easier for those who already know the topic they are looking for and how it is likely to be characterized. Rating 3/5

    1. This link is for the Association of Information Science and Technology. While many of the resources are available only to those who are association members, there are a great many resources to be found via this site. Among the items available are their newsletter and their journal articles. As the title suggests, there is a technology focus, and also a focus on scientific findings that can guide instructional designers in the presentation and display of visual and textual information, often but not exclusively online. Instructional designers are specifically addressed via the content of this site. A student membership is available. Rating 5/5

  2. Mar 2019
    1. While some of these sharing models might have resulted from a need for frugal spending after the global economic recession of 2008, their success was also driven by a growing environmental consciousness combined with the ubiquity of Internet and associated information and communi-cation technologies which make sharing possible at scale.

      talks about how the internet and technology have helped in the expansion of the sharing economy.

    Tags

    Annotators

    1. Strategy Exchange

      When students share what they found with each other, they are helping each other to find more information.

      By figuring out what is the best out of all the MP3 players, they are comprehending the information that is being presented on each website.

      Collaborating with each other to boost their comprehending skills.

    1. In a field such as technology, in which time does not march so much as it whizzes by, the freshness test is understandable.
  3. Feb 2019
    1. Teachers in the substitution and augmentation phase can use technology to accomplish traditional tasks,  but the real learning gains result from engaging students in learning experiences that could not be accomplished without technology. At the Modification and Redefinition level, the task changes and extends the walls of the classroom

      Using the whole SAMR model can help our students to use autonomy to learn information and helps us to differentiate their learning experiences.

    2. Researchers have determined that technology integration typically moves through specific levels. The higher the level of an activity the greater the educational benefit.

      The more technology is integrated into our lessons, the more learning will occur. It is important to remember that technology helps us to make content more relatable and interesting to our students.

    1. Each situation presented to teachers is a unique combination of these three factors, and accordingly, there is no single technological solution that applies for every teacher, every course, or every view of teaching. Rather, solutions lie in the ability of a teacher to flexibly navigate the spaces defined by the three elements of content, pedagogy, and technology and the complex interactions among these elements in specific contexts

      Every teacher is student and every group of students are different. The way to use this information is to base it on how we teach the best and how our students learn the best. There is no "right" or "wrong" way but there are many different ways that work for different teachers and students

    2. Instead, TPACK is the basis of effective teaching with technology, requiring an understanding of the representation of concepts using technologies; pedagogical techniques that use technologies in constructive ways to teach content; knowledge of what makes concepts difficult or easy to learn and how technology can help redress some of the problems that students face; knowledge of students’ prior knowledge and theories of epistemology; and knowledge of how technologies can be used to build on existing knowledge to develop new epistemologies or strengthen old ones.

      Using technology to incorporate content knowledge and teaching strategies in our lessons will help students to better understand the information that we are trying to teach them.

    3. A teacher with deep pedagogical knowledge understands how students construct knowledge and acquire skills and how they develop habits of mind and positive dispositions toward learning

      (Maybe use this quote). Understanding students and how they learn helps us to incorporate technology and teach content so that they can get a full understanding of what we are trying to teach.

    4. Equally important to the model are the interactions between and among these bodies of knowledge, represented as PCK, TCK (technological content knowledge), TPK (technological pedagogicalknowledge), and TPACK

      The interaction of all three areas is important because it will help us to understand technology when it comes to lesson planning and content knowledge. Knowing what types of technology to use based on our pedagogical methods and the content that we are teaching our students will help us to implement them to ensure full understanding from our students.

    5. At the heart of good teaching with technology are three core components: content, pedagogy, and technology, plus the relationships among and between them. The interactions between and among the three components, playing out differently across diverse contexts, account for the wide variations seen in the extent and quality of educational technology integration

      Incorporating technology on its own will not be helpful to us when we are teaching. We must also base what tools we use around the content that we are teaching, our teaching methods and ability to differentiate a lesson, and the type of technology we are trying to incorporate. Technoology is useful when used correctly and wisely, so when we lesson plan, we must think about these before implementing our instruction.

    6. There is no “one best way” to integrate technology into curriculum. Rather, integration efforts should be creatively designed or structured for particular subject matter ideas in specific classroom contexts

      We should find ways to incorporate technology based on the content that we are teaching, the students' abilities in our classes, and our understanding of the technology that we are using. If we don't understand a certain technology or it doesn't relate to what we are teaching or the technology is too advanced for our students then incorporating the technology will be unuseful in our lessons.

    7. Furthermore, teachers have often been provided with inadequate training for this task. Many approaches to teachers’ professional development offer a one-size-fits-all approach to technology integration when, in fact, teachers operate in diverse contexts of teaching and learning

      Technology is always changing, how will we keep up with the changes and how will we incorporate tools that we are unsure about? It is understandable that in college, we learn about the current technology of that time, but it is our responsibility to understand that technology will always change and that we should try to keep up-to-date on what tools we can use to teach our lessons.

    8. Understanding how these affordances and constraints of specific technologies influence what teachers do in their classrooms is not straightforward and may require rethinking teacher education and teacher professional development

      We must continue to learn new information and about new technologies so that we can better teach our students. Professional development can help us to understand the problems that can arise when using technology so that we can easily work through them when they do happen.

    9. Rather, particular technologies have their own propensities, potentials, affordances, and constraints that make them more suitable for certain tasks than others

      How will we use these technologies to help our students learn even though they will have problems that come along with it? How can we make sure that we limit the amount of problems that will occur in our lessons?

    1. first draft could represent a free outpouring of thoughts

      This paragraph outlines a truly augmented way of writing that cannot happen using paper. To me noting on paper has changed purpose. Sometimes it is an echo noting of a quote, a key word, a diagram. It is closer to drawing. But writing as thinking out loud, writing as trying to make sense...that is tech aided. I am sure my mind changes its processimg focus depending on whether I face a screen or a copybook. Just as you shift perspective when you watch through a camera lens to take a good pic...you see more.

    2. Other situations might admit changes requiring years of special training, very expensive equipment, or the use of special drugs.

      My reply to another post about historical context might be helpful. https://hyp.is/R07lQCldEem5RmPv1ywB5g/worrydream.com/Engelbart/

    3. how would our education system change to take advantage of this new external symbol-manipulation capability of students and teachers (and administrators)?

      Let's say it's been twenty years since PDAs have been widely available. I returned to higher education less than ten years ago. K-12 seems to have embraced learning technologies, and their affordances, to improve primary and secondary education. In my experience, few educators with terminal degrees have made the effort while younger and more precarious teachers are slowly adopting educational technologies. Administrators are leading the way with their digital management systems and students are using proprietary social media platforms. Our institutions are doing what they were designed to do: resist change and reproduce the social order. Research paid for with public monies is as quickly privatized as that produced in corporations. Open education practices are just beginning to be explored.

      The first PDA, the Organizer, was released in 1984 by Psion, followed by Psion's Series 3, in 1991. The latter began to resemble the more familiar PDA style, including a full keyboard.[4][5] The term PDA was first used on January 7, 1992 by Apple Computer CEO John Sculley at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas, Nevada, referring to the Apple Newton.[6] In 1994, IBM introduced the first PDA with full telephone functionality, the IBM Simon, which can also be considered the first smartphone. Then in 1996, Nokia introduced a PDA with telephone functionality, the 9000 Communicator, which became the world's best-selling PDA. Another early entrant in this market was Palm, with a line of PDA products which began in March 1996. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Personal_digital_assistant

    4. He is designing a building. He has already dreamed up several basic layouts and structural forms,

      I find it interesting how decades of using computers has led to "new methods of thinking and working that allow the human to capitalize upon the computer's help." With all the new technologies, I think the central intellectual development has been to reverse the sequence of design decisions Engelbart describes. Best practice these days is to start with "the people who will occupy this building, and the daily sequences of their activities."

    5. can be of significant benefit to the human in nonmathematical processes of planning, organizing, studying, etc.

      I'll be interested to see if this report is entirely Positivist, or if Engelbart recognizes the possibility of computing being weaponized in sectors like politics, economics, security and warfare.

    6. different planes here and there, curved surfaces occasionally

      Many new technologies were combined to realize this prescient sentence.

      WaltDisneyConcertHall.jpeg<br>By Jon Sullivan - PDPhoto, Public Domain, Link

    7. a working station that has a visual display screen some three feet on a side; this is his working surface, and is controlled by a computer (his "clerk") with which he can communicate by means of a small keyboard and various other devices

      Here's an example of a state of the art workstation in 1962.

      Tektronix 4014.jpg<br>By The original uploader was Rees11 at English Wikipedia. - Transferred from <span class="plainlinks">en.wikipedia</span> to Commons., CC BY-SA 2.5, Link

    1. A.T.E.’s Concentrated Solar Thermal system has provided solutions for commercial and industrial applications. Solar thermal technology is used in it which uses solar energy from the sun. This technology directly impacts costs and increase your savings by being energy-efficient. The system also has many benefits like easy to install, longer life cycle, user friendly etc.

    1. Would you rather trust a human legal system or the details of some computer code you don't have the expertise to audit?

      A corollary question might be, if the legal system and code of laws have gotten so highly specialized that they require specialists to navigate them, are you trusting a "human" system or a technology? (With the answer including the fact that humans being involved at all is different from a machine-implemented algorithm, even if human decisions are constrained by the legal "algorithms.")

    1. This process helps avoid the common problems of treating the textbook as the curriculum rather than a resource, and activity-oriented teaching in which no clear priorities and purposes are apparent

      Making our own lesson plans and using the textbook as a resource. Integrating technology can help to shy away from using the textbook as the backbone of our lesson plans.

    1. malleable

      get the multiple and dynamic…but what does malleable mean here?

      Of the three…this is the most interesting to me. Does it mean that we'll see opportunities for student work process/product be a bit more portable, transferrable, remixable? If so…sign me up. :)

    2. among members of particular groups

      Wondering how much a focus on "in the classroom" limits us as I believe most learning contexts in the future will be outside of traditional classroom settings. Also thinking about power structures in these contexts.

    3. continued evolution

      Wondering how far we (and NCTE) would like to push/advocate for "evolution" of curriculum, assessment, & teaching. I've been thinking lately (as per guidance from Gerber & Lynch) that we need to really problematize and reinvent these elements. Thinking about more digitally native pedagogies (and assessments, practices, etc.) as opposed to digitizing the traditional.

      An example would be considerations of computational thinking/participation in theoretical perspectives, or authentic assessments using API data or a tool like Hypothesis.

  4. Jan 2019
    1. machine intelligence

      Interestingly enough, we saw it coming. All the advances in technology that lead to this much efficiency in technology, were not to be taken lightly. A few decades ago (about 35 years, since the invention of the internet and online networks in 1983) people probably saw the internet as a gift from heavens - one with little or any downsides to it. But now, as it has advanced to such an extreme. with advanced machines engineering, we have learned otherwise. The hacking of sites and networks, viruses and malware, user data surveillance and monitoring, are only a few of the downsides to such heavenly creation. And now, we face the truth: machine intelligence is not to be underestimated! Or the impact on our lives could be negative in years to come. This is because it will only get more intense with the years, as technology further develops.

    1. but is ever present in the world of educational technology

      I've tried in vain to find an article I read in the recent past about how only a small percentage of educational technology products are effective in improving student achievement. I also enjoyed this article/chart, which illustrates how technology is a TOOL, not the method: https://www.iste.org/standards/for-students

    1. 21st Century Skills (21C Skills)

      A focus on 21st Century Skills.

    2. reach and meet the growing number of diverse audiences using the web

      Important to focus on diverse audiences globally.

    1. Portfolio School is a project-based start-up school in New York's Tribeca neighborhood, which emphasizes guided choice and a personalized education, mixing technology with learning activities.

      Emphasis on personal choice and technology

    1. the calcu-lation of uses and applications that might be made of the vastly increased available means in order to devise new ends and to elimi-nate oppositions and segregations based on past competitions for scarce means. (24)

      Does this sound like Mark Zuckerberg's idealism before it devolved into a data-mining project in the service of neoliberal economics?

    1. A creative communicator expresses themselves clearly and concisely through digital media

      It is sometimes difficult to interpret what someone is saying through technology, so it is important to be fully aware of how and what you are saying to people through technology.

    2. To be a computational thinker, ISTE says students must be able to create and employ strategies for solving problems that use technology
    3. It also requires students to learn solution design, meaning they have to diagnose problems, prescribe solutions, and even make those solutions with digital tools

      Learning how to deal with problems digitally can help students to learn how to work out problems in their daily lives and even other areas of technology.

    1. – long distance calls were expensive.

      Mobile phone companies have now abolished roaming chargers in Europe meaning you can call any other countries in Europe as the same price as a local call.

    2. Only television rivals the mobile device in its speed of adoption by the American people.

      I wonder has the sales of televisions decreased since the introduction of mobile phones, tablets and laptops, where many people view tv online or on streaming sites such as Netflix

    3. How do you like being interrupted at dinner or while making love? How do you like it when your boss phones you just before you fall asleep?

      This problem must relate to a house phone which seems quite dated now as many people, in particular younger generations just use mobile phones now which come with handy settings such as silent, night mode and aeroplane mode!

    1. Theseunderstandings of spatial technologies build on les-sons from science and technology studies (STS)research that describes the processes by which dataand technologies come to assume and reify social andpower relations, worldviews, and epistemologies(Feenberg1999; Pinch and Bijker1987; Wajcman1991; Winner1985)

      Good summation of Bijker's and Winner's STS work

    1. The Victorian periodical The Westminster Review wrote that the introduction of gas lamps would do more to eliminate immorality and criminality on the streets than any number of church sermons.
  5. Dec 2018
    1. In her lifetime, my grandmother journeyed from a world confined to her immediate physical community to one where she now carries out video conversations over the internet with her grandchildren on the other side of the world, cheaply enough that we do not think about their cost at all. She found her first train trip to Istanbul as a teenager—something her peers would have done rarely—to be a bewildering experience, but in her later years she flew around the world. Both the public sphere and our imagined communities operate differently now than they did even a few decades ago, let alone a century.

      It's nice to consider the impact of the technologies around us and this paragraph does a solid job of showing just that in the span of a single generation's lifetime.

    2. Te c h nolo-gies alter our ability to preserve and circulate ideas and stories, the ways in which we connect and converse, the people with whom we can interact, the things that we can see, and the structures of power that oversee the means of contact.
    1. became so efficient in offices that they killed off the need for most of the old-fashioned secretarial skills Ms. Berezin was trying to enhance.

      Ironic. Unintended consequences.

  6. Nov 2018
    1. 2.1.1 Cognitive and psycholinguistic theories of SLA One of the main theoretical frameworks on the cognitive side is the input–interactionist paradigm (Long, 1996), and the early research on online interaction in FL/SL contexts focused on the development of linguistic competence in in-class interaction, e.g., comparing online synchronous interaction with face-to-face student interaction. Many of these studies used a quantitative methodology, involving control groups of students engaged in face-to-face interaction that were compared to experimental groups of learners participating in online interaction or intra-class studies in which the same students took part in both face-to-face and online interaction (Warschauer, 1996b). What was often counted and categorized were linguistic features and language functions (e.g., Chun, 1994; Kern, 1995), and researchers showed how negotiation for meaning occurs in intra-class online chat (e.g., Blake, 2000). Similarly, studies of online interaction based on psycholinguistic theories of SLA (e.g., Ellis’ (2006) Associative Cognitive CREED and Schmidt’s (1990) Noticing Hypothesis) have found that text-based chat promotes noticing of grammatical and lexical features or errors (e.g., Lai & Zhao, 2006; Lee, 2008). Other studies of interclass interactions between learners and native speakers (Tudini, 2003) or tandem learning partnerships (Kötter, 2003; O’Rourke, 2005) have investigated form-focused interaction, negotiation of meaning and code switching, primarily linguistic aspects of SL/FL learning.

    2. In both SLA and CALL (computer-assisted language learning) research, a new perspective may be found in ecological approaches, e.g., van Lier (2004), who takes an ecological world view and applies it to language education. Ecology broadly studies organisms in their relations with their environment. Van Lier’s approach thus incorporates many different perspectives with regard to language learning, e.g., sociocultural theory, semiotics, ecological psychology, and the concepts of self and identity. Key constructs in this approach to language learning are affordances and scaffolding, with an affordance defined as the relationship between an organism and something in the environment that can potentially be useful for that organism. Technology is viewed as a source of affordances and learning opportunities for language learners. Appropriate scaffolding, i.e., help from peers, teachers, or technology itself, might also be necessary, and this is a core feature of telecollaboration.

    3. 2.1.2 Sociocultural theories of SLA In contrast to interactionist research, Block (2003) proposed the “social turn” taken by the field of SLA, and variations of socially based theories and approaches have flourished. For example, socio-cognitive paradigms (Kern & Warschauer, 2000), which view language as social and place emphasis on the role of cultural context and discourse, are often used in the research on telecollaboration. Many studies have been influenced by sociocultural theory (Belz, 2002; Thorne, 2003; Ware, 2005). In the Vygotskian perspective, language is viewed as a mediating tool for learning, and the entire language learning process must by necessity be a dialogic process (see, e.g., Basharina, 2007; Blin, 2012, who rely on Activity Theory and Cultural Historical Activity Theory, respectively, for their analyses of telecollaboration). Other studies make visible the development of linguistic, pragmatic, and intercultural competence in both intra-class telecollaboration (e.g., Abrams, 2008) and inter-class interactions (e.g., Belz & Thorne, 2006; Jin & Erben, 2007). Chun (2011) reports on advanced German learners in the United States engaging online with advanced English learners in Germany, as they used different types of speech acts to indicate their pragmatic ability and to show their developing ICC. Specifically, some learners realized that they could exhibit curiosity and interest (a component of ICC) by engaging in multi-turn statements and did not need to use questions to convey their intent.

    1. The results of the paired-groups experimental study proves "are interpreted as being supportive for the interactionist perspective on SLA, especially the importance of attention". The study focuses on the acquisition of lexical meaning through negotiated interaction on NNS-NNS synchronous CMC. Check into Long's Interaction Hypothesis.

      The benefits of CMA in language learning: interactionist perspective.

    1. "Researchers have found that cognitive interactionist and sociocultural SLA theories offer a means of interpreting prior research on CALL and suggest a point of departure for designing future studies of CALL activities that are based on human–computer interaction and computer-mediated communication."

      Chapelle. C. A 2007. theories expand from interactionist to cognitive interactionist and sociocultural theory cognitive interactionist: Human-computer interaction. sociocultural: CMC (Computer-Mediated Communication)

    1. Sociocultural Approaches to SLA and Technology (Steven Thorne): Sociocultural approaches (SCT) to second language acquisition draw from a tradition of human development emphasizing the culturally organized and goal-directed nature of human behavior and the importance of external social practices in the formation of individual cognition. This paper describes the principle constructs of the theory, including mediation, internalization, and the zone of proximal development, and will describe technology-related research in these areas. Vygotskian SCT shares foundational constructs with distributed and situated cognition, usage-based models of language acquisition, language socialization, and ecological approaches to development, all of which have contributed to new applications of SCT in the areas of language research and pedagogical innovation. A discussion of methodological challenges and current practices will conclude the presentation.

    2. Ecological Approaches to SLA and Technology (Leo van Lier): Ecological approaches to SLA are premised on a holistic view of human-world interrelations and the notion of affordance-effectivity pairings that help to better understand human activity and functioning. To many educators, technology and ecology are irreconcilable opposites. Yet, educationally speaking, they turn out to be perfectly compatible. This presentation examines the ways in which the Internet is an emergent resource, a social tool, and a multimodal repository of texts. The ecological affordances of CALL will be illustrated in terms of activity through, with, at and around computers.

    3. The Interaction Approach and CMC (Bryan Smith): The Interaction Approach(IA) in second language acquisition studies suggests that there is a link between interaction and learning. This approach focuses on three major components of interaction — exposure (input), production (output), and feedback. Many CALL researchers have adopted this theoretical perspective in exploring the relationship between CMC and instructed second language acquisition, exploiting many of the argued affordances offered by this medium in relation to the key tenets of the IA. This paper will provide a conceptual overview of the IA and explore specifically how CALL researchers have sought to study SLA from this theoretical perspective. We will discuss several methodological hurdles facing researchers engaged in this type of research and will offer some suggested strategies for conducting sound SLA/CALL research from an IA.

      the interaction approach overlaps with psycholinguistic approach under the cognitive theory

    4. Psycholinguistics, SLA, and Technology (Scott Payne): Investigating second language acquisition and CALL from a psycholinguistic perspective entails examining how language learners process, store, and retrieve information from memory and how cognitive capacity impacts acquisition and influences performance. This paper will provide an overview of psycholinguistic approaches to SLA research highlighting research findings relevant to the field of CALL. This discussion will include some of the challenges and opportunities for researchers interested in employing psycholinguistic methods for studying SLA in classroom and computer-mediated contexts.

      (https://paperpile.com/view/d6077af8-b494-0c5b-bcbe-71ea1d198029)

    1. In today's fast-paced knowledge-intensive economy, work of importanceis increasingly accomplished coUaboratively through informal networks. As aresult, assessing and supporting strategically important informal networks inorganizations can yield substantial performance benefits. In addition, networkrelationships are critical anchoring points for employees, whose loyalty andcommitment may be more to sets of individuals in their network than to a givenorganization. Our research (and that of others) has found that these informalnetworks are increasingly important contributors to employee job satisfactionand performance. Yet despite their importance, these networks are rarely well-supported or even understood by the organizations in which they are embedded.Social network analysis provides a means with which to identify and assess thehealth of strategically important networks within an organization. By makingvisible these otherwise "invisible" patterns of interaction, it becomes possible towork with important groups to facilitate effective collaboration

      The author does a great job of examining social relationships and the effect they have in the workplace. The author asserts that by making the connections and work visible there will be a better result.

      9/10

    1. A number of authors argue that professional development requires adual focus on both knowledge of subject matter content and an understand-ing of how children learn specific content.

      This article addresses what makes professional development effective and why. It reviews study results to show what works in a national sample of teachers. This article has good information on professional development.

      9/10

    1. This article takes a different perspective on technological integration, showing that sometimes technology, when used improperly, can set a class backwards.Examples in the article clearly show that effective use of technology is extremely important, otherwise the technology may cause more problems than it offers solutions.

      Rating: 9/10

    1. This article takes the perspective that education should not necessarily be solely focused on educational experiences, as we tend to do. Rather, technology should also have a focus in supporting non-academic areas and using data to drive instruction.

      Rating: 7/10

    1. This research takes an interesting look into the role gender plays in self-efficacy in technology. The research finds that self-efficacy in technology was primarily effected by gender and gender roles, not specifically by biological sex.

      Rating: 10/10

    1. Several problems and barriers to technological integration are often included in the discussion about using technology in higher education, however it is less common that solutions are presented. This article proposes solutions for transforming educational technology through personalized experiences and collaboration.

      Rating: 8/10

    1. This article suggests that perhaps keeping updated and informed on technology can prevent the shut-down and closure of specific degrees and the departments they come from. Technology is constantly changing, and it is expected that institutions will change with it. Rating: 7/10

    1. The Flipped Classroom:An OpportunityTo Engage MillennialStudents Through ActiveLearning Strategies

      This article discussing using the flipped classroom using accessible technology and expand learning activities. The authors point out that the use of technology must be based on training provided to teachers to implement the technology in the classroom.

      RATING: 8/10

    1. Factors influencing teachers’ adoption and integration of information and communication technology into teaching: A review of the literature

      This article is a review of literature regarding what influences teachers to adopt and integrate information and communication technology (ICT) in the classroom. This discussion takes into consideration age, gender, prior exposure to technology, and teacher attitudes. Further consideration is given to institutional support, technical support, available professional development, and access to both hardware and software. The conclusion is that there are numerous levels of support that are required to make technology support and training available to educators.

      RATING: 7/10

    1. Technological Pedagogical ContentKnowledge: A Framework for TeacherKnowledge

      The authors discuss the fact that traditional learning has been an intersection of content knowledge and pedagogical knowledge, but with today's learning environment, it must also intersect with technological knowledge which requires further professional growth and development. The authors further discuss the challenges keeping up with the rate of change of technology and suggest that this is just a foundation for the ongoing research in educational technology.

      RATING: 7/10

    1. This site includes five highly effective technological resources that instructors can use in their higher ed classrooms. What is especially useful about this site is that it includes a rationale for all the proposed technologies, ensuring that the technology is not just including in lesson planning for technology's sake.

      Rating: 10/10

    1. We often talk about avoiding the use of technology for technology's sake and ensuring here is relevance in the integration. This site lays out specific characteristics of effective technologies in the classroom.

      Rating: 9/10

    2. This article has several resources teachers can use to incorporate technology into their lessons. It also gives ideas on how to become more proficient with adding technology to the classroom and what to do if the technology enhanced lesson fails. Ratings: 4/5

    3. What Is Successful Technology Integration?

      This article offers a few ideas on how to measure the success of technology integration. Rating: 4/5

    1. This article brings up the important issue of accessibility as a barrier to technology integration. It is suggested that accessibility should be a much more pressing concern than technological relevance to a lesson plan. First it is important to know whether or not all students will still have equal access and ability to reach mastery with the deliver method provided.

      Rating: 7/10

    1. This article focuses on the importance of using technological integration in the classroom correctly and effectively. Barriers to effectiveness, as the article states, are often linked to lack of rational, vision, or necessity for including technology in instruction.

      Rating: 8/10

    1. This is scholarly article that shares research findings in questions such as, to what extent is there a relationship between faculty's comfortableness with technology and perception of technology integration and student success? The data is very interesting, including the fact that students in the sample reported being most proficient with a printer and least proficient with a smarboard. This definitely indicates a shift in what technological knowledge a professor will need verses their students.

      Rating: 9/10

    1. This article looks into the different ways technology can be incorporated into adult learning. These methods include technology as curriculum, technology as delivery mechanism, technology as complement to instruction, and technology as an instructional tool. The benefits and limitations of each method is also discussed. Rating: 4/5

    2. This site gives a thorough overview into the integration of technology in the classroom. The most helpful element it includes is a list of limitations to consider within this integration. The downside is you will have to "dig" a little through the article to find the solutions to these problems, as they are not immediately obvious. Rating: 8/10

    1. This article documents how Ohio State University trains new elementary and middle school teachers to incorporate technology into their lessons. It highlights that technology integration is a tool not a theory or education. It also states that technology integration should be used to enhance the students' learning instead of forcing it into the curriculum. Rating: 5/5

    1. This website details a case study that was performed in order to determine the effectiveness of online advising (a position I am currently involved in myself). There were several studies conducted and student responses are detailed in charts-- overwhelmingly, students felt the online advising format was a success.

      Rating: 10/10

    1. This page has easy-to-follow methods for integrating technology into academic advising practices. Many of the theories listed are quite similar to simply good teaching techniques such as using data to drive instruction and maintaining continuous outreach. Rating: 8/10

    1. This article gives a few quick insights into how technology is useful in academic advising. This article makes the distinction between technology "complementing" advising and actually impacting student success. In other words, technology should never be a sole substitute for success. I would like to see more numerical-based data supporting the claims listed, but there are some great resources cited.

      Rating: 7/10

    1. The way we choose what to buy, like the way we choose how to vote, will never be logical. Trying to make it so has created an environment in which our basest impulses are relentlessly stimulated and amplified. The philosopher Gilles Deleuze once remarked, “It is not the slumber of reason that engenders monsters, but vigilant and insomniac rationality.” If ever there was a creation of insomniac rationality it is the 21st-century advertising business. Its monsters roam the planet.
    2. “Knowing that the seller has faith in their product is a hugely valuable piece of information,” he says. “In luxury goods, for instance, the ad says almost nothing; the cost of the ad almost everything.” Biologists regard the peacock’s tail as an expensive and so unfakeable signal of fitness – a sexual status symbol.
    3. “Flowers are ads. Peacocks’ tails are ads.” Rory Sutherland, vice-chairman of Ogilvy & Mather, and the ad industry’s most vigorous defender, is in full flow over lunch at his agency’s offices in Blackfriars. “One reason I’m not predicting the death of advertising any time soon is that you can see how important it is in nature. A flower is basically a weed with an advertising budget.”
    1. Instructional Design Strategies for Intensive Online Courses: An Objectivist-Constructivist Blended Approach

      This was an excellent article Chen (2007) in defining and laying out how a blended learning approach of objectivist and constructivist instructional strategies work well in online instruction and the use of an actual online course as a study example.

      RATING: 4/5 (rating based upon a score system 1 to 5, 1= lowest 5=highest in terms of content, veracity, easiness of use etc.)

    1. “The ADDIE model consists of five steps: analysis, design, development, implementation, and evaluation. It is a strategic plan for course design and may serve as a blueprint to design IL assignments and various other instructional activities.”

      This article provides a well diagrammed and full explanation of the addie model and its' application to technology.

      Also included on the site is a link to an online course delivered via diversityedu.com

      RATING: 4/5 (rating based upon a score system 1 to 5, 1= lowest 5=highest in terms of content, veracity, easiness of use etc.)

  7. create-center.ahs.illinois.edu create-center.ahs.illinois.edu
    1. CREATE Overview

      Create is a non-profit organization dedicated to providing resources for the development and creation of educational technology to enhance the independence and productivity of older adult learners.

      The sight includes publications, resources, research, news, social media and information all relevant to aging and technology. It is the consortium of five universities including: Weill Cornell Medicine,University of Miami, Florida State University,Georgia Institute of Technology, and University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

      RATING: 4/5 (rating based upon a score system 1 to 5, 1= lowest 5=highest in terms of content, veracity, easiness of use etc.)

    1. At the intersection of technology and pedagogy:considering styles of learning and teaching

      When examining the pedagogy of learning, teacher and student centered approaches, there is additional evidence supporting a model moving more towards technology-based learning. This articles considers the question of technology in the classroom and its' advantages/disadvantages.

      RATING: 4/5 (rating based upon a score system 1 to 5, 1= lowest 5=highest in terms of content, veracity, easiness of use etc.)

    1. Using Model Strategies forIntegrating Technology into Teaching

      In this pdf, there are many helpful tips and techniques in creating a foundation for technology. The introduction of model strategies are laid out with lots of supporting detail and examples and weblinks. It includes nearly 400 pages of peer-reviewed lessons, models and various strategies.

      RATING: 5/5 (rating based upon a score system 1 to 5, 1= lowest 5=highest in terms of content, veracity, easiness of use etc.)

    1. Teaching Tech Skills to Older Adults

      Ed Tech Center for world education's article on teaching older adults technology is a primer for understanding considerations of introducing technology as the prime delivery mode for education.

      The article includes simple tips such as providing individual attention, offering reinforcement and affirmation and how to problem solve. The tips are aimed at an older adult group age 70+.

      RATING: 2/5 (rating based upon a score system 1 to 5, 1= lowest 5=highest in terms of content, veracity, easiness of use etc.)

    1. Study: Most Teaching and Learning Uses Technology Nowadays

      This article reviews the impact of technology in the classroom. Today over 73% of teachers stated students are using tablets or laptops in the classroom. According to David Nagel, technology not only dominates education but also make students more productive and stimulates them intellectually.

      There is a link on the site to the complete study.

      RATING: 4/5 (rating based upon a score system 1 to 5, 1= lowest 5=highest in terms of content, veracity, easiness of use etc.)

    1. 1Engaging Adults Learners with Technology

      The pdf provides information from The Twin Cities Campus Library with instruction incorporating technology into teaching adult students.

      It includes a review of instructional technology, assessment for learning, framework for teaching adult learners and a workshop. This 14 page pdf provides the essentials necessary in understanding basic learning needs of adult learners.

      RATING: 3/5 (rating based upon a score system 1 to 5, 1= lowest 5=highest in terms of content, veracity, easiness of use etc.)

    2. Engaging Adults Learners with Technology

      This presentation features a broad overview of adult learning and defines an adult learner. Additionally, the presentation provides multiple technology resources that can be used in an adult learning environment. Rating: 4/5

    1. Distance Education Trends: Integrating new technologies to foster student interaction and collaboration

      This article explores the interaction of student based learner-centered used of technology tools such as wikis, blogs and podcasts as new and emerging technology tools. With distance learning programs becoming more and more popular, software applications such as Writeboard, InstaCol and Imeem may become less of the software of choice. The article looks closely at the influence of technology and outcomes.

      RATING: 4/5 (rating based upon a score system 1 to 5, 1= lowest 5=highest in terms of content, veracity, easiness of use etc.)

    1. Factors Influencing Teachers' Integration of ICT in Teaching and Learning

      ICT is enhancing communication in the digital learning environment. In this article the integration of ICT is explored and reveals how both teachers and students are able to better utilize their digital options 24/7 more effectively and efficiently. In addition, a gap has been identified in being showing how to best use ICT in the learning environment and included are in-depth studies of its’ use. The article identifies factors influencing teachers’ decision to integrate ICT in teaching.

      RATING: 4/5 (rating based upon a score system 1 to 5, 1= lowest 5=highest in terms of content, veracity, easiness of use etc.)

    1. LINCS is a national leadership initiative of the U.S. Department of Education, Office of Career, Technical, and Adult Education (OCTAE) to expand evidence-based practice in the field of adult education. LINCS demonstrates OCTAE’s commitment to delivering high-quality, on-demand educational opportunities to practitioners of adult education, so those practitioners can help adult learners successfully transition to postsecondary education and 21st century jobs.

      The LINCS website has an abundance of information that can prove useful in the designing of adult educational materials which are technology based. The site includes courses, articles and links 743 research studies, materials and products. In addition there are State Resources for Adult Education and Literacy Professional Development. Overall I found the site to be a wonderful source of relevant information to tap into.

      RATING: 5/5 (rating based upon a score system 1 to 5, 1= lowest 5=highest in terms of content, veracity, easiness of use etc.)

    1. 10 Training Tips for a Successful Technology Integration

      This blog provides ten tips to successfully integrate technology in the classroom. The tips include conducting a needs assessment, plan ahead, and to not let the technology become the focus. Rating: 5/5

    1. Technology Integration for the New 21st Century Learner

      Although focusing on younger learners, this article details many things to consider when integrating technology into the classroom. Additionally, Blair shares ideas for developing a plan to continue technology planning into the future. Rating: 4/5

    1. Technology Integration and Higher Education

      Dr. Jones explains that instructors are reluctant to use technology and choose to use a traditional lecture as a teaching method. He continues to explore how to eliminate the barriers to technology integration. Rating: 5/5

    1. Anticipating and Addressing Challenges With Technology in Developmental Education

      The authors describe how to anticipate and handle challenges with technology integration in developmental education. They insist that vendors and end users must work together to develop technology that will benefit everyone. Rating: 4/5

    1. Educational Technology Leadership and Practice in Higher Education: The Emergence of Threshold Concepts

      This article explores how technology has become the new standard for higher education and this new standard has created a need to develop new concepts on how to view a subject. Additionally, methods to use educational technology resources are described. Rating: 5/5

    1. Bringing IT to the Forefront of Innovation: How to Leverage Technology to Drive Innovation on Campus

      Dr. Burrell explores how technology can be used to more tightly integrate students and faculty and provide an efficient form of communication and discovery. He also details what is needed from a technical standpoint to make technology easily adoptable by universities. Rating: 4/5

    1. What K–12 Administrators Should Think About When Integrating Classroom Tech

      This article describes how school districts who wish to integrate more technology into their classrooms should approach the integration. Rating: 4/5

    1. What is the future of technology in education?

      The article explores how technology will grow beyond individual devices and how it will move into the cloud. Cloud computing would allow students and teachers to access course content any time and any place. Rating: 5/5

    1. Here's how technology is shaping the future of education

      This article explains how technology is changing education and offers a few examples of how it has already done so. Rating: 5/5

    1. 5 Teaching Strategies to Engage Students Using Technology

      This article offers strategies on how to integrate technology into the classroom and get students involved. Rating: 4/5