130 Matching Annotations
  1. Oct 2020
    1. Higher education institutions need to address these challenges, and technological tools — even some surprisingly simple ones — can go a long way toward enhancing the college experience for older students, says Brian Fleming, executive director of the Sandbox ColLABorative at Southern New Hampshire University.

      Older students (over 25) are often changing careers. They tend to have more responsibilities than traditional college students, and a lower threshold for micro-frustrations like bureaucracy, form. Colleges should accommodate them with things like digital signatures and virtual meeting availability. Technology should be platform-agnostic for them (and everyone). 5/10

    2. Technology Can Help Adult Learners Get the Most Out of Higher Ed

      (Available as transcript or podcast.) This article reviews the definition of the adult learner, identifying their particular learning needs and challenges. Considerations and recommendations for implementing technology are discussed (agnostic software, alleviate micro-frustrations). 5/10

    1. Research about adults as learners can inform the design of effective digital learning experiences. Although there is no one principle that can be applied to all adults, the design principles outlined here are based on five of the prevailing theories about how adults learn: andragogy, experiential learning, self-directed learning, transformational learning, and neuroscience.

      This article applies the principles of andragogy, self directed learning, experiential learning, transformational learning, and neuroscience (all of which seem rather similar), to low-skilled adults, who are likely to lack confidence about learning and who may be learning in bits of free time via cell phone. Emphasizes the importance of an instructor or coach, along with good use of technology. 8/10

    1. Faculty need to focus on learning theory in the design of instructional technology so that they can create lessons that are not only technology-effective but that are meaningful from the learner’s standpoint.

      Fidishun, a librarian and Penn State's satellite campuses, expands Knowles' 6 assumptions of andragogy, and draws out some of their implications for technology-based instruction for adults. This is short and to the point, but readers would benefit from the writer going into greater details. 7/10

    1. TECHNOLOGY ADOPTION IN HIGHER EDUCATION: OVERCOMING ANXIETY THROUGH FACULTY BOOTCAMP

      This article uses educational theory to examine why educators feel anxiety in association with learning and using new technologies and how best to teach new technologies without triggering anxiety. 7/10, good discussion of theories and methods along with reasoning.

    1. TECHNOLOGY INTEGRATIONTHROUGH PROFESSIONAL LEARNING COMMUNITY

      This article examines the effectiveness of learning communities to support integration of technology into classrooms and effective teacher growth in the area of technology proficiencies. 5/10, learning community findings are useful but this source is very targeted towards a specific group of adult learners.

    1. Technology Andragogy Work Content Knowledge Model as a New Framework in Vocational Education: Revised Technology Pedagogy Content Knowledge Model

      This article focuses on using adult education theory to integrate technology into vocational education. This expands adult learning opportunities to community colleges and trade schools. 8/10 interesting and different from an equity and accessibility standpoint.

    1. Language Research Bulletin,32, ICU, TokyoAndragogy in the 21st century: Applying the Assumptions of Adult Learning Online

      This article emphasizes the importance of creating online programs that have learning objectives that correspond to learners' real-world needs. It examines Knowles' Andragogical Model to provide guidelines for incorporating adult learning principles into course design. 10/10, very good blend of strategy and theory.

    1. A Comprehensive Exploration of Technology's RoleIin Adult Learning

      This article examines and gives bit of information from a book covering the intersection of adult learning and technology innovation. 4/10, while there is information here it is certainly not the entire book and therefore incomplete. It does serve as a quick and accessible alternative for those seeking the books information but lacking the time/ access to read the book.

    1. Integrating academic and everyday learning through technology: Issues and challenges for researchers, policy makers and practitioners

      This article examines the potential to connect academic with knowledge learned through life and career experience using technology and other traditional methods. Challenges and best practices are presented and all levels of individual and institution are included in the discussion. Rating 8/10. Very interesting idea and cool how many levels of organization are included.

    1. Adapting adult learning theory to support innovative, advanced, online learning - WVMD Model

      This article details how to build an innovative online learning environment using methods based on influential adult learning theories. These theories include Social Development Theory, Behaviorism, Critical Reflection and Nurturing the Soul. 10/10, many theories throughly discussed.

    1. Lifelong learning: Formal, non‐formal and informal learning in the context of the use of problem‐solving skills in technology‐rich environments 

      Nygren, H., Nissinen, K., Hämäläinen, R., & Wever, B. (2019). Lifelong learning: Formal, non‐formal and informal learning in the context of the use of problem‐solving skills in technology‐rich environments. British Journal of Educational Technology, 50(4), 1759–1770. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.12807

      The evolving technological landscape in the digital era has a crucial influence on lifelong learning and the demand for problem‐solving skills. In this paper, we identify associations between formal, non‐formal and informal learning with sufficient problem‐solving skills in technology‐rich environments (TRE). We focus on adults' problem‐solving skills in TRE as a novel approach to investigate formal, non‐formal and informal learning based on data from the Programme for the International Assessment of Adult Competencies. This programme measured 16–64‐year‐old adults' proficiency in problem‐solving skills in TRE. The total sample size was 61 654 individuals from 13 European countries. Our results clearly indicate that the skill levels of more than 50% of adults aged 16–64 years old seem to be insufficient to cope effectively in TRE. The findings suggest that the learning ecologies of adults are a combination of formal, non‐formal and informal learning activities. The overall level of problem‐solving skills in TRE was higher among individuals who indicated that they have participated either formal or non‐formal learning activities, compared to those who have not. However, interestingly, the association between formal learning and problem‐solving skills in TRE was not major. Instead, our results clearly indicate that informal learning seems to be highly associated with sufficient problem‐solving skills in TRE. In practice, we outline those formal, non‐formal and informal learning activities that adults perform when applying the skills in TRE. By recognising these activities undertaken by sufficient problem solvers, we can promote lifelong learning skills. Our findings can also be used as a starting point for future studies on lifelong learning.

      https://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&AuthType=shib&db=tfh&AN=138139297&site=eds-live&scope=site&custid=uphoenix

    1. Teaching with Web 2.0 Technologies: Benefits, Barriers and Lessons Learned

      In this article, the author defines Web 2.0 technology and use for Web 2.0 in higher education. Through a small study of educators, discovery includes advantages, obstacles, and general guidance for implementation of web 2.0 tools. The author supports use of Web 2.0 to supplement learning, not as a substitute for the educator. Technologies must be implemented strategically and purposefully. 7/10

    1. Using wikis for collaborative learning: Assessing collaboration through contribution

      Through a study of freshman students, the author aimed to determine the success of the Wiki for collaboration. Results revealed variances in learner responses and use of the tool. Lack of use was explained by individual barriers (family, social, work) and system barriers (wiki design). The authors conclude that for the Wiki to be an effective, collaborative tool, additional resources must be provided to the learner, and the Wiki must be meaningful in its design to foster that participation. 7/10

    1. Social Media and Networking Technologies: An Analysis of Collaborative Work and Team Communication

      Trends in Web 2.0 technologies and various networking modalities are briefly reviewed. Furthermore, advantages and barriers in the use of said technologies are discussed. Implementation of social media as a learning tool can be advantageous, however, it must supplement learning, not replace a structured environment. The educator should still remain present in the learning environment. And, he/she should provide appropriate support and training, as well as model, respective online tools to ensure efficacy. 6/10

    1. Wiki Use that Increases Communication and Collaboration Motivation

      (Click on download full text to read.) Through a cooperative learning assignment, University students responded to a case study that implemented use of a Wiki. Results demonstrate that Wiki is an effective communication and collaboration tool (access, structure, versioning) for all individuals (introvert, extrovert). Recommendations and considerations for use in the learning environment were provided. 6/10

    1. How To Make Online Corporate Learning Fun During Lockdown

      (Available in text or audio.) This article provides basic principles (agenda, duration) and technologies (gamification, discussion boards) and activities to keep employees engaged in online learning. While this provides strategy, it does not provide implementation guidance within the corporate environment. (2/10)

    1. 10 Active Learning Methods for Super Engaged Corporate Learners

      This article reviews the concept of active learning and its need in today's workplace training. Ten strategies to promote active learning via technology are discussed (collaborative virtual classrooms, mind mapping, brainstorming, scavenger hunts, role play/simulation, problem-based learning, discussion boards, teach back, jigsaw technique, flipped classroom, game based learning). This is a good resource for active learning strategies. (5/10)

    1. E-Learning Implications for Adult Learning

      (Click Download full text to read.) In this brief article, the authors contrast the child and adult learner. Highlighting the adult learner's characteristics, the article further discusses factors that might affect the individual learning style. Furthermore, the authors discuss these styles in the context of eLearning (extravert, introvert, sensory type, intuitive adult, reflexive type, affective type, rational type, and perceptive type). Each learning type and preferred eLearning method is illustrated (Table 1, p. 60). Rationale for the implementation of eLearning is detailed (p. 61). Guidelines for the use of eLearning is discussed. (6/10)

    1. Creativity, Self-Directed Learning and the Architecture of Technology Rich Environments

      (Click Download full-text PDF to read). In this article, the authors reflect on the need to cultivate creativity and self-directed learning through transition from conventional course design to a more comprehensive design, which includes technology, problem solving, and collaboration. Moreover, the authors contend that measures of success should not be limited to traditional assessment methods. Barriers to the success of a self-directed design within the typical learning environment are mentioned. Through case study review, the authors demonstrate that strategic course design (educator, setting, technology, expectations) fosters development of the self-directed learner. Dynamics supporting the success of the technology-rich, creative, self-directed design were included. With a methodological approach that incorporates technology, problem-solving, teamwork, and educator support, self-directed behaviors emerge.(8/10)

    1. Features and characteristics of problem based learning

      The problem based learning (PBL) strategy is defined. The strategy is defined as an iterative process with specific goals (knowledge, problem-solving skills, self-directed skills, collaboration, motivation for learning). The authors go on to describe the advantages, disadvantages, limitations, and considerations for the use of PBL. Integration of technology allows for new opportunities in education and training across disciplines. (7/10)

  2. nevadasadulteducationcommunity.wdfiles.com nevadasadulteducationcommunity.wdfiles.com
    1. Integrating Technologyinto Adult Learning

      The author discusses four strategies (curriculum, mechanism, complement to instruction, instructional tool) for integrating technology in adult learning, their advantages and considerations. The use of any method will require changes to a curriculum, learning environment, and learner and educator roles. Therefore, technology integration should be done purposefully. 7/10

    1. Project Based Learning to Develop 21st Century Competencies

      In this chapter, the author defines problem based learning (PBL) and highlights the benefits to the learner. In addition to incorporating technology to enhance learning, the article reinforces the need to foster the softer skills that may be developed as a result of PBL (teamwork, accountability, problem-solving, creative thinking, risk-taking, communication skills, and critical thinking skills). Though the data is limited, and there are inherent challenges, PBL is of value in course design. (8/10)

    1. An Evaluation of Problem-based Learning Supported by Information and Communication Technology: A Pilot Study

      (Under "Viewing Options", select PDF.) In this article, Ernawaty and Sujono (2019) summarize results of a study funded by the Research and Higher Education Directorate of Indonesia. The study aimed to evaluate the cogency of information and communication technologies (ICTs) in problem based learning (PBL) and traditional teaching methods (TTM) based upon learner test scores. The concepts of PBL, TTM, and implications of ICTs are briefly reviewed. Results of the study revealed that PBL with the support of an ICT yielded the highest test scores. (6/10)

    1. Strategies for Virtual Learning Environments:Focusing on Teaching Presence and TeachingImmediacy

      Through a literature review of 50 articles published between 2003-2014, the authors explored aspects of online learning (teacher presence, teacher immediacy) that impact learner interest and motivation in the online environment. Recognizing that these aspects are key, the authors explore various approaches to retention the virtual setting. The multifaceted role of the instructor is reviewed as well as virtual facilitation strategies. The literature search revealed a positive correlation between teaching presence, teaching immediacy, and learner engagement and motivation. 6/10

    1. Characteristics of Adult Learners With Implications for Online Learning Design

      The author reviews assumptions of the adult learner and adult learning theory. In discussion of adult learning theories (self-directed learning, experiential learning, transformational learning), the article investigates their use in online learning. Furthermore, the author provides online course development recommendations for the adult learner. A brief critique of andragogic principles is provided. Adult learning principles used in a live environment are of benefit and necessary in the virtual environment. Click "Full Text" to read article. 7/10

  3. Aug 2020
    1. *Game star mechanic

      • Creativity is expressed via making video games online
      • problem solving skills increase
      • comments-feedback
      • constructive criticism needed
      • teachers need to be constructive in terms of feedback How does this change as school has become more online?
    1. Student interests i.e HP Alliance, influence how to participate and change society.

      • students change moby dick
      • guess Sound of Thunder ending (9th grade)
      • friendship driven participation-hanging with friends online
      • messing around-creative, geeky, interest driven, develop sophisticated forms of media literacy
      • think critically about privacy and identity
      • generational gap in online use and activities How will this be addressed in our technologically influenced world? How can teachers reach out to the friendship and messing around groups of students? What does it mean to participate in society?
    1. In creating online content, creativity is often influenced from other sources. Then the question is not only what is creativity but also what is originality? What does this say about copyright infringement in terms of digital property? What does this say about patent law?

    1. I like how the technology and collaborative aspects are being used to relate the issue of homelessness not only to the past events but also the issues facing their community on both a local and personal level.

    1. Construction is equal parts inspiration and perspiration. Construction calls on creativity as well as persistence, flexibility, and revision. Construction asks our students and teachers to focus on the power and patience employed during work process…and not just the final resultant work product

      Nothing is ever finished on the internet

    2. our understanding of construction and creation needs to be broad enough to allow for change in the future.

      the internet is constantly changing everyday as more information is uploaded daily. Nothing is ever finished being constructed

    3. . In order to fill the void I would see concerning the creativity, composition, and design skills students need…we have been developing online content construction (OCC)

      This is especially important as technology integration in the classroom has become critical under our current situation.

  4. Jul 2020
  5. May 2020
  6. Apr 2020
  7. Mar 2020
    1. Emerging Theories of Learning and the Role of Technology

      This article discusses the social changes introduced by new technologies and how educational environments are trying to prepare students to enter a technologically advanced workforce through integration of technology with curriculum. The author challenges traditional theories of learning by discussing how cognition is situated in the digital, 21st-century learner, and that technology integration should focus on the importance of community within learning environments. Although the article challenges the traditional ideas of technology integration, it fails to provide actionable ways in which educators could infuse technology into their own curriculum. Rating: 6/10

    1. Research in Educational Technology

      This textbook, published by the Oklahoma State University Library ePress, contains a chapter which summarizes the main views of knowledge in educational technology research, including postpositivism, constructivism, advocacy, and pragmatism, as well as each view's research traditions. The chapter suggests an approach to evaluating research articles through the lenses of a consistent learning theory coupled, methodologies that support that learning theory, and the conclusions that are drawn by the researchers supported through their methodologies. This chapter would help educators evaluate how and why they might include technology into their course curriculum. Rating: 7/10

    1. Integrating Technology in the Adult Education Classroom

      This website offers an online course regarding the purposes, guidelines, and implementation of integrating technology into adult learning environments. Additionally, the course offers examples of ways to integrate that technology. Rank: 7/10

  8. Nov 2019
    1. Integrating Technology with Bloom’s Taxonomy

      This article was published by a team member of the ASU Online Instructional Design and New Media (IDNM) team at Arizona State University. This team shares instructional design methods and resources on the TeachOnline site for online learning. "Integrating Technology with Bloom's Taxonomy" describes practices for implementing 6 principles of Bloom's Digital Taxonomy in online learning. These principles include Creating, Evaluating, Analyzing, Applying, Understanding, and Remembering. The purpose of implementing this model is to create more meaningful and effective experiences for online learners. The author guides instructors in the selection of digital tools that drive higher-order thinking, active engagmenent, and relevancy. Rating 9/10

    1. Training and Development Policy Wiki

      This webpage, under the Office of Personnel Management (OPM) .gov site, provides an extensive list of technology resources that can be and have been implemented into a variety of employee deveolpment programs. These tools allow for more personalized learning, active participation, collaboration, and communication.In the first section of the site, examples of Web 2.0 tools are listed that can promote collaboration and constructive learning. You can also find technologies that are used in specific sectors, such as the Federal Government and the Private Sector. Clicking on the links redirects you to additional resources on the tech tools, including how to use them effectively and professionally for employee training. Rating 10/10

    1. Using Technology to Enhance Teaching & Learning

      This website provides technology teaching resources as part of the Southern Methodist University (SMU) Center for Teaching Excellence. Users can find informational links to various technology tools that can be used for enhancing teaching and learning in online, hybrid, or face-to-face courses. On the right of the page under "Technology," users can click on the tech tools for additional resources/research on their implementation. Examples of these technologies include Blackboard LMS, PowerPoint presentation software, Google Suite products, blogs, and social media sites. Rating 8/10

    1. Empowering Education: A New Model for In-service Training of Nursing Staff

      This research article explores an andragogical method of learning for the in-service training of nurses. In a study of a training period for 35 nurses, research found an empowering model of education that was characterized by self-directed learning and practical learning. This model suggests active participation, motivation, and problem-solving as key indicators of effective training for nurses. Rating 8/10

    1. Digital Literacy Initiatives

      This website outlines digital literacy initiatives provided by the Literacy Information and Communication System (LINCS). The U.S. Department of Education, Office of Career, Technical, and Adult Education (OCTAE) implements these intitatives to aid adult learners in the successful use of technology in their education and careers. Students have free access to learning material on different subjects under the "LINCS Learner Center" tab. Teachers and tutors also have access to resoruces on implementing educational technology for professional development and effective instruction. Rating 8/10

    1. 1Engaging Adults Learners with TechnologyThrough

      Instruction Librarians from the Twin Cities Campus Library created this instructional gudie as a workshop for implementing technology for adult learning. First, the authors describe key characteristics of adult learners as identified in the theory of andragogy. Examples of these characteristics include the need to know, learner responsibility, past experiences, and motivation to learn. The authors then suggest instructional practices and activities to meet the needs of adult learners, Finally, they provide examples of technology tools for effectively engaging adult learners. Rating 10/10

    2. Designed to be used in a workshop setting, the content provides an understanding of adult learning theory and it's application of best practices in both face to face and e-learning environments. Participants are provided a list of web tools to facilitate learning.

      6/10: the format is bit difficult to access out of context

    1. ISTE Standards Transform learning and teaching.

      This resource is the website for the International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE), which serves educators and professionals in the implementation of technology in education. The site provides open access readings, learning guides, and membership material for educators' development with technology. You can also find ISTE Standards for teachers, students, technology coaches, and educational leaders/administrators. These standards serve as the skills and knowledge each group should obtain for effective teaching and learning with technology.

    1. Section 1.5 Online Learner Characteristics, Technology and Skill Requirements

      This website outlines Section 1.5 of Angelo State University's guide to instructional design and online teaching. Section 1.5 describes key characteristics of online learners, as well as the technology and computer skills that research has identified as being important for online learners. Successful online learners are described as self-directed, motivated, well-organized, and dedicated to their education. The article also notes that online learners should understand how to use technology such as multimedia tools, email, internet browsers. and LMS systems. This resource serves as a guide to effective online teaching. Rating 10/10

    1. E-Learning Theory (Mayer, Sweller, Moreno)

      This website outlines key principles of the E-Learning Theory developed by Mayer, Sweller, and Moreno. E-Learning Theory describes how the implementation of educational technology can be combined with key principles of how we learn for better outcomes. This site describes those principles as a guide of more effective instructional design. Users can also find other learning theories under the "Categories" link at the top of the page. Examples include Constructivist theories, Media & Technology theories, and Social Learning theories. Rating: 8/10

    1. Learning Domains

      This website provides several examples of domains adults may learn in or engage with. By clicking on each type, you are redirected to a detailed description of the domain. Descriptions include, but are not limited to, definitions, theories and research behind the topic, and real-world examples. You can also find references used in the description, which can be helpful for further exploration. This InstructionalDesign.org website also provides extensive lists of learning concepts (i.e. motivation, personalized learning, storyboard, etc.) and theories (i.e. Adult Learning Theory, Social Learning, Constructivism, etc.). Each learning theory link provides a theoretical definition, applications, examples, key principles, references, and related websites. Rating 10/10.

    1. Tech Literacy Resources

      This website is the "Resources" archive for the IgniteED Labs at Arizona State University's Mary Lou Fulton Teachers College. The IgniteED Labs allow students, staff, and faculty to explore innovative and emerging learning technology such as virtual reality (VR), artifical intelligence (AI), 3-D printing, and robotics. The left side of this site provides several resources on understanding and effectively using various technologies available in the IgniteED labs. Each resources directs you to external websites, such as product tutorials on Youtube, setup guides, and the products' websites. The right column, "Tech Literacy Resources," contains a variety of guides on how students can effectively and strategically use different technologies. Resources include "how-to" user guides, online academic integrity policies, and technology support services. Rating: 9/10

    1. In the text "10 Current and Emerging Trends in Adult Education," ten current trends are briefly reviewed. Among these are the emphasis on effort, growth, and social-emotional learning. In terms of technology, real-life simulations and AI are being used to better prepare learners for their professional encounters and responsibilities. In terms of what is on the horizon for adult learning, one can expect mastery to be emphasized rather than degrees. As a result of the information economy, it is expected that income inequality will grow and thus advocacy for adult learners and continued opportunities for working adults to grow will mitigate the negative consequences. Rating: 7/10

  9. www-chronicle-com.libproxy.nau.edu www-chronicle-com.libproxy.nau.edu
    1. Technology

      This website explores technology news within the field of higher education. The site contains a wide variety of news articles on current issues, trends, and research surrounding the integration of technology in universities and colleges. This includes technology's prevalence in teaching and learning, institutional decisions, and societal trends of higher education. The articles are published by authors for "The Chronicle of Higher Education," a leading newspaper and website for higher education journalism. Rating: 7/10

    1. Flores examines the current research as it relates to distance learning. She explores technology integration and learning theory. Throughout, she stresses the importance of professional development for instructors to equip them to provide quality distance education.

      10/10

    1. The authors detail their development of a professional learning community to advance technology integration at Nova Southeastern University. After a literature review of the key components of online learning, they discuss the method of implementing the PLC and the major outcomes and then offer recommendations for starting a PLC within institutions of higher ed.

      10/10

    1. The authors present the benefits of coaching in professional development for educators in today's technologically advanced classrooms. Of particular interest is the explanation of the different methods of coaching: executive, coactive, cognitive, and instructional. They suggest that coaching provides more successful outcomes than single workshops and stress that finding the correct method for each situation and organization is crucial.

      10/10

    1. To optimize learners' experience and the efficacy of learning outcomes, instructors need to consider how technology can offer approaches better suited to adult learning.

      This website from University of Arizona provides a list of trends and issues in learning technologies

      Rating 9/10

    1. Teaching and learning methods: opreparing for teaching ofacilitating the integration of knowledge, skills and attitudes oteaching and learning in groups ofacilitating learning and setting ground rules oexplaining ogroup dynamics omanaging the group olectures osmall group teaching methods and discussion techniques oseminars and tutorials ocomputer based teaching and learning – information technology and the World Wide Web ointroducing problem based learning ocase based learning and clinical scenarios

      this website is consisted of available resources.

      Rating: 9/10

    1. This web page can be used in many ways because it has theories from the old to new in education and technology, and from institutions to working environments, and military. You will find George Bush, Steve Jobs, and Seymour Papert from MIT, just to name a few.

      It is really nice to see new and not so new perspectives of people that do not provide learning theories, but combine learning theories with technology, which to me is relevant for today's educators and learners. 5/10

    1. Section 508 compliance is discussed to support instructors knowledge of section 508 and how to begin the process of ensuring instructional content is 508 compliant. Section 508 of the federal Rehabilitation Act governs access of media to all persons whether they have a disability or not. Including captions, audio description, and accessible video players are vital to compliance. Compliance with 508 is necessary given that data that illustrates the percent of employees that have need for accommodations to support their learning. This brief article seems highly related to Universal Design of Learning. Rating: 10/10

    1. The Digital Promise article presents four major factors to consider when implementing technology for adult learning purposes. The factors include flexibility and benefits of blended learning, data use to support development of instruction, environments with diverse technology available support various learners, and allow the instructor's role to change to meet learner needs. Issues related to each factor are shared and suggestions for resolutions are provided. Rating: 7/10-a good resource for introduction to factors and issues in adult learning via technology.

    1. Twitter offers two distinct benefits to engaging learners. First of all, it allows learners to respond to classroom discussions in a way that feels right for them, offering shy or introverted students a chance to participate in the class discussion without having to speak in a public forum. Secondly, it allows students to continue the conversation after class is completed, posting relevant links to course material, and reaching out to you (the educator) with additional thoughts or questions.

      The article explains how social media, student learning through digital experience, and Learning Management Systems can be beneficial to the learner/student. Article Rating: 3/5

    1. Some of our adult-ed students take their courses virtually, with students checking in with teachers via Skype or by email, but a majority spend at least some time in a classroom.

      This article expresses how learning can be taught using the internet and one does not have to be in class to learn.

  10. May 2019
  11. Apr 2019
    1. This article is a breakdown from the U.S. Department of Education around the types of learning environments that exist in the technology arena. It provides examples of schools fulfilling these different environments and offers a collection fo additional resources.

      Rating: 9/10

  12. Mar 2019
    1. This paper addresses the question about how today’s modern schools can prepare learners for the future in the age of technology. The response to this question is discussion around innovative learning environments that involve the use of technology. Technology has been a concern for the rapid change in the educational landscape and this paper aims to highlight transformation and innovation in relation to technology for teaching and learning. 9/10 for helpful diagrams and tables.

    1. This paper discusses the idea that design is responsible for developing learning and teaching in technology rich environments. This paper argues Cultural Historical Activity Theory. This paper uses this perspective to discuss their ideas of design in connection with the digital age. This paper is written from the perspective German, Nordic, Russian and Vygotskyan concepts that seek to define the relationship between learning and teaching in relation to design. Rating 9/10 for mixing design with digital learning

    1. This article is for teachers and contains multiple resources about how to integrate technology into the classroom and the different types of technology integration. This article is full of examples and ideas teachers can use to facilitate technology in the classroom. Rating: 9/10 for use of examples and practical application.

    1. The use of digital technologies across the adult life span in distance education.

      Research article. This article explores how older and younger student approach studying through the use of technology and reveals that those in older age groups were more likely to use technology in deep in focused ways to study once they got the hang of it and younger groups were more likely to remain on the surface level of a variety of technologies.

    1. 1Engaging Adults Learners with TechnologyThrough hands-on experience and reviewing the literature, two instruction librarians explore and model best practice

      This article comes from the Twin Cities Campus Library and discusses how to engage adult learners with technology. First, it looks at Kolb's learning model of instructional design which includes that adults must have applying, awakening, practicing and observing. It is also imperative to have hands on learning when it comes to technology. Rating 7/10

    1. Laboratory activities and constructivism are two notions that have been playing significant roles in science education. Despite common beliefs about the importance of laboratory activities, reviews reported inconsistent results about the effectiveness of laboratory activities. Since laboratory activities can be expensive and take more time, there is an effort to introduce virtual laboratory activities. This study aims at exploring the learning environment created by a virtual laboratory and a real laboratory. A quasi experimental study was conducted at two grade ten classes at a state high school in Bandung, Indonesia. Data were collected using a questionnaire called Constructivist Learning Environment Survey (CLES) before and after the laboratory activities. The results show that both types of laboratories can create constructivist learning environments. Each type of laboratory activity, however, may be stronger in improving certain aspects compared to the other. While a virtual laboratory is stronger in improving critical voice and personal relevance, real laboratory activities promote aspects of personal relevance, uncertainty and student negotiation. This study suggests that instead of setting one type of laboratory against the other, lessons and follow up studies should focus on how to combine both types of laboratories to support better learning.

      In this peer-reviewed study, two tenth-grade classes were analyzed as they used either a virtual or a real laboratory to accomplish learning tasks. The question raised was whether a real or a virtual laboratory was more conducive to constructivist learning. The study concluded that a real lab is better than a virtual one to trigger constructivist learning. This is of importance to me because I teach adults about software in both virtual and real laboratories, and when I develop content, I try to use the constructivist theory as much as possible as I find it works best for my audience, in addition to making novel content more relatable. Please note: I could not put the annotation on the text because the paper opened in a popup page that does not work with Hypothes.is. 7/10

    1. How to Design Education for Adults

      This wonderful how-to by Southern New Hampshire University provided several well explained tips about what adults need in their learning environments, including their own learning theory, goals, relevant instruction, treatment by the teacher, and participation. These are important things to keep in mind when training working adults because it may have an impact on what information is offered and how it is presented. I will use the information in this article later to help me present content in a meaningful way for my working adult learners. I want the content to be as relevant and inviting to them as possible. 9/10

    1. 6 Effective Strategies for Teaching Adults

      This article from Point Park University provides several methods one can use to help educate adults. Ideas presented include ensuring content is relevant, knowing the audience, igniting emotion in the audience, ensuring assignments are attainable, and providing constructive feedback. I find these especially helpful because of my work, which often involves teaching adults who are busy and sometimes uninterested in my content. The section that will help me most is "Encourage Exploration." Because I'm training on a software tool, I want learners to go into the software and make mistakes and learn from them. I want them to poke around! It can be difficult to convince a class of disgruntled 60-year-old men who are mad that things are changing to go play with a complex software tool like children. 7/10

    1. Adults & Learning: How to Provide for Working Professionals

      The Digital Marketing Institute published this article to help those who provide training for professional adults. It echoes a lot of what I've read in other articles about teaching adults: The goals are different, and they have different needs from the instructor than children do. I liked that this article mentioned that many professional adults find technology to be a barrier, but I wish there were more information about it. The article discussed several of the biggest challenges for adult learners, which was a nice change from the quintessential adult learner article that focuses on what learners need. I also want to know what they don't need. Some of the barriers to learning include a lack of time, responsibilities, financial stressors, fear of technology, and trouble identifying the ideal learning path. 8/10

    1. Training Older Adults To Use New Technology

      This article, published in the Journals of Gerontology, discusses a study that focused on teaching older adults to use technology. This is often discussed in a practical sense, with many how-to's. This article, however, discusses the theory behind gerontological learning. Older adults don't generally learn the same way younger adults do. Therefore, it is important to provide them with practice that shows tasks have continuity, to ensure the important task components are focused on strongly, and to consider whether the learning goals are appropriate for the learner. Representative design is addressed here. This is the first time I've heard of representative design. I teach many people over the age of 60 to use technology, so it is important for me to know the theory that will help them learn best. Interestingly,this article mentioned that performance should be assessed based on a comparison of the older adult's environment. I wish I could use that more in my work, but it's a young person's world now. 9/10

    1. Teaching with technology

      The University of Wisconsin - Madison published this helpful, quick guide to assist instructors in using technology to teach others. It discusses some of the technology available to help teach, including Microsoft products, Blackboard, Kaltura, and others. It also discusses some of the tools the school uses to facilitate blended learning. This includes Google Apps, technology-equipped classrooms, and a Quality Matters subscription that helps produce high-quality blended learning products. It is important to incorporate technology in the classroom because it helps to facilitate learning and engage learners. 5/10

    1. bridging formal and informal learning through technology in the twenty first century: issues and challenges This article is in a fully online journal. It relates to schools but the learning is by students, not teachers. However, professional development is called for. The article addresses the desired topic in that it refers to social networking and other technology enabled forms of learning; however, it does not seem to be substantive enough to be tremendously helpful. rating 1/1

    1. designing for sustainable mobile learning: evaluating the concepts formal and informal This is a journal article that is freely available online. They argue that informal learning is more 'enriching' than formal learning. They write about mLearning (mobile learning) and state that some 'design aspects' must be left to learners. This is formatted in the standard way and has the usability one would expect of an online journal article. There are citations as one would expect but I am not qualified to evaluate the information quality. rating 5/5

    1. This article explains just in time learning (such as that which can be done via devices) within the context of higher education. My interest is in public health education, but at this moment, I am not sure how much I can narrow in on that topic, so I will save this for now. This is obviously not a scholarly article but is of some interest nonetheless. rating 2/5

    1. This page, Top Tools for Learning, is updated every year. It lists and briefly describes the top tech tools for adult learning. For the current (2018) list, they are YouTube, PowerPoint, and Google Search. The list proceeds through the top 200 and there are links to each tool. The purpose of this page is to list them; tutorials, etc. are not offered. Rating 4/5

    1. Campus Technology magazine This is the website for a magazine that is also published on paper. Articles are freely accessible (a subscription is not required). The design of the page is messy and as with any magazine, the content varies, but the site does give a description of the use of technology in higher education. The same technologies can sometimes be applied in adult learning in general. Rating 4/5

    1. Edutech wiki This page has a somewhat messy design and does not look very modern but it does offer overviews of many topics related to technologies. Just like wikipedia, it offers a good jumping off point on many topics. Navigation can occur by clicking through categories and drilling down to topics, which is easier for those who already know the topic they are looking for and how it is likely to be characterized. Rating 3/5

  13. Nov 2018
    1. This article takes a different perspective on technological integration, showing that sometimes technology, when used improperly, can set a class backwards.Examples in the article clearly show that effective use of technology is extremely important, otherwise the technology may cause more problems than it offers solutions.

      Rating: 9/10

    1. This article takes the perspective that education should not necessarily be solely focused on educational experiences, as we tend to do. Rather, technology should also have a focus in supporting non-academic areas and using data to drive instruction.

      Rating: 7/10