759 Matching Annotations
  1. Feb 2019
    1. No caso de prórroga por un ano, efectuarase un aumento salarial equivalente ó incremento do IPC
    2. Artigo 4.–Vixencia, duración e prórroga. Ultraactividade.O presente convenio entrará en vigor o día 1 de Xaneiro do 2016, independentemente da súa publicación no Boletín Oficial da Provincia. Terá unha duración de tres anos, ata o día 31 de decembro do ano 2018. En calquera caso o Convenio manterá a súa vixencia 24 meses máis do que estableza a normativa legal vixente de aplicación.
  2. Jan 2019
    1. Graduate teaching assistant salaries also are reported in the aggregate. Across institution types, they made $11,205 this year, on average. Those at doctoral institutions made more, at $14,345 (the salaries were roughly the same at both public and private universities). Graduate teaching assistants at master’s-level institutions made about $9,000 and those at baccalaureate institutions made about $7,042.

      GTA salaries don't keep up with cost of living.

    1. graduate teaching assistants making up almost another 13 percent

      Graduate teaching assistants are filling nearly 15% of all teaching positions in higher ed. What are the consequences for undergrads?

    1. one of the most pervasive topics of concern and frustration that I address in my workshops with faculty members and graduate teaching assistants is classroom incivility

      GTAs at Portland State often ask for more training around conflict resolution and difficult conversations.

    1. Graduate student workers' newly won right to unionize at private universities is a ding on those institutions' credit, Moody's Investors Service said Thursday.

      What are some of the other side effects of unionization, both positive and negative?

  3. Sep 2018
    1. The case marked one of the highest-profile clashes in the debate over encryption and data privacy between the government and a technology company. Law enforcement authorities say that encryption used by the likes of Apple makes it harder for them to solve cases and stop terrorist attacks.

      It makes it harder for the government to catch terrorist if they can't get access to their cell phones.

  4. May 2018
    1. This is an alternative approach to the common practice of solely designating leadership to experienced, veteran teachers

      This may require explicit, institutional change. Young teachers often have the perception that leadership is only for long-serving teachers and not volunteer.

      There are also cases of opening invitations but teachers serving in those roles are superseded by older staff (DCs, assistant principals, etc) who do not recognize those leadership roles, formal or informal.

    2. Converging findings from both qualitative and quantitative results provide robust evidence for the three types of teacher leadership presented in this chapter.

      Diverse, recognized roles of leadership can help form stronger approaches to problem solving within districts.

    3. the existing body of research currently does not delineate different types of teacher leadership into an organized framework to guide future research in this emerging area of professional practice

      Non-defined "leadership" up until this point. Their model fits the observation and survey data.

    4. teacher leaders often spoke of challenging the status quo to create channels of communication in a traditionally hier­archical system

      Removing the top-down nature of decision making by levelling the discussions will build buy in from staff.

    5. decision-making culture that include formal teacher leadership positions

      Bridging the gap between instructional staff and district leadership. Using extra time to advocate for "on the ground needs" can build internal capacity for growth and buy in from the instructional staff.

    6. . These roles enabled them to bring the experi­ences and voices of classroom teachers to systems-level decisions.

      Seems more like an add-on leadership position rather than a standalone. It can certainly be either, but it can be rolled into either IL or PL leadership positions.

    7. Furthermore, an incentive for PL teachers’ participation in a professional learning leadership role was the opportunities to learn from other teachers.

      PL seems more transactional. The leader is coaching, but they are also aware of the benefits of forming relationships with other teachers.

    8. Proximity to colleagues has been documented to be critical for de-privatizing teaching and improving student outcomes

      Getting into each other's spaces helps break down walls. Be the strategic inviter, not waiting for invitations.

    9. he importance of facilitating adult groups to promote ownership of new pedagogies and, in turn, transfer of their learning to practice.

      Much more of a coaching model, facilitating reflection on instruction and guiding conversation and reflection to lead to new methods or solutions to problems.

    10. exhibited leadership at the level of school sites (grade-level teams, staff department meetings), districts (district-wide science PD workshops), or beyond (workshops at national conferences)

      Adult learning leadership

    11. For the instructional innovators, leadership work that extended outside of the classroom still remained student- and/or instruction-centered, such as participating in the development of standards-aligned curricula.

      Leadership does not require extensive professional development (re, conversation with Kasey!); a focus on a goal and putting resources into achieving those goals builds leaders.

      "Who are you willing to disappoint?"

    12. Instructional innovators challenged the common practice of teaching in isolation by making their teaching public for a wide range of stakeholders

      To innovate in instruction, other people have to see you teach.

      Open door policies are good, but actively searching for eyes is better and delineates the difference between a participant and a leader.

    13. Instructional innovators’ expertise of student learning also supported their ability to efficiently retrieve and apply pedagogical heuristics and principles to meet the diverse learning needs of their students (Peterson & Clark, 1978; Shavelson & Stem, 1981)

      You have to know more than the content - you have to understand how to apply that material in an instructional setting (beyond explaining an idea)

    14. m ary of Three Types of Teacher

      Leadership matrix.

    15. Although findings showed that each teacher represented primarily one leadership type, in some cases, teachers exhibited characteristics, roles, targets, and/ or means of influence that were associated with another type of leadership.

      See previous footnote about pigeonholing people into a single leadership construct.

      Some of the skills cross contaminate, with teachers falling into multiple groups. One dominant trend was identified for most participants.

      https://hyp.is/MrDyallyEeiR2ff6OJD6Sg/blackboard.bsu.edu/bbcswebdav/pid-6813371-dt-content-rid-92457167_1/courses/2018SUM_EDST680S800_CLAS_36846_OL/Bae%2C%20Hayes%2C%20O%27Connor%2C%20Seitz%2C%20%26%20Distefano_2016.pdf

    16. (1) instructional innovator, (2) professional learning (PL) leader, and (3) administrative teacher leader

      Identified leadership groups based on emergent data.

    17. Examples of emergent codes include “content expertise,” “novice teachers,” and “reform and policy interest” (component 1; characteristics of leaders); “curriculum work” and “facilitating learning of adult learners” (component 2; leadership work); “systems approach” and “classroom-based leadership” (component 3; means of influence); and “students,” “principals,” and “teacher colleagues” (component 4; targets of influence).

      Emergent properties of leadership in various components to see holistic leadership characteristics.

    18. 910

      Graphic on this page

    19. empirical evidence regarding the benefits of teacher lead­ership is mixed

      What defines a "benefit?" Is it financial incentive? Job satisfaction? Perception with colleagues? All of the above?

    20. A second way that teacher leadership is highlighted is through their role in professional learning contexts, in which they promote ongoing dis­course, collaboration, and accountability among colleagues to improve educational practices (Curtis, 2013; Hart, 1995; Stoll, Bolam, McMahon, Wallace, & Thomas, 2006

      It's amazing to me that we need leadership positions to recognize this behavior.

      How can leadership in a building be leveraged to make this the normal behavior of teaching?

    21. Whereas teacher leaders were once identified primarily in formal administrative roles (e.g., department chairs) or as instructional experts (e.g., mentors to new teachers), teacher leaders are now increasingly recognized as engaging in varied leadership roles across the school sys­tem, with the goal of improving instruction and shaping school culture (Curtis, 2013; Patterson & Marshall, 2014; Mangin & Stoelinga, 2008; Silva, Gimbert, & Nolan, 2000

      Varied perspectives in varied leadership roles can help diversity instructional methods, models, and best practices. At the same time, leadership can be diluted into nothingness.

      "Everyone is a leader" = "No one is a leader"

    22. Further, engaging teachers as leaders in and out of the classroom is particularly important given the current context of education reform, including the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) and the Next Gen­eration Science Standards (NGSS) (NRC, 2013)

      How do these, in particular, increase the need - or opportunity - for teacher leaders?

  5. Apr 2018
  6. Jan 2018
  7. Nov 2017
    1. Whistle-blowers and dissidents might need to use a different platform.)

      The way that he casually mentions whistle blowers and dissidents is troubling to say the least. Also, will dig up studies, but removing anonymity hasn't really shown to decrease trolling or other bad behavior. Also, "privacy" anyone?

      http://theweek.com/articles/632929/problem-internet-trolls-isnt-anonymity

  8. Aug 2017
  9. Jul 2017
  10. Jun 2017
    1. Stephen Robertson. 2017. “The Differences between Digital Humanities and Digital History.” In Debates in the Digital Humanities. Accessed June 26. http://dhdebates.gc.cuny.edu/debates/text/76.

    2. The audiences to which we are now seeking to explain our work are increasingly not only administrators and funding agencies whose broad remits echo the breadth of digital humanities, leaving us to elaborate only the digital
    3. In singling out digital literary studies as a counterpoint, I seek to disrupt the recent tendency in both scholarly and popular discussion to equate that field with digital humanities.

      DH has very commonly been associated with Literary studsies

    1. p. 75 We now believe that the introduction of "Digital Humanities" represents not only an administrative change, but also a change in the way electronic texts were consumed. The increasing use of the web by humanists in the mid 1990s transformed the field, as the Web provided a way of distributing and publishing electronic editions of texts. This may explain why less and <pb n="76">less of our discussion was about hardware and software and more and more was about services.</pb>

    2. p. 70 In only a few years, Digital Humanities seems to have gone from a marginal field trying to gain respect to a favorite of university administrators. Digital humanists now need to define and justify what DH is to people who ask, rather than attempting to convince anyone willing to listen. It is difficult to pin down exactly when this transition happened.

    3. p. 9 Since its inception, Digital Humanities has been committed to communities of practice; community has been in its fabric. Historically, it was a field that included service units that supported computing for humanities departments in universities and brought faculty members, staff members, programmers, and students together to run labs, manage servers, and develop tools.

    4. Rockwell, Geoffrey, and Stéfan Sinclair. 2016. Hermeneutica: Computer-Assisted Interpretation in the Humanities. Cambridge, Massachusetts ; London, England: The MIT Press.

  11. May 2017
    1. What is clear, is that data are increasingly conceptualized as inherently valuable products of scientific research, rather than as components of the research process

      Data is beginning to be seen as valuable rather than a left-hand component of the research process.

    2. the vast majority of scientific data generated in the 20th century have only been accessed by small groups of experts; and few of those data, selected in relation to the inferences made, have been made publicly available in scientific journal

      The vast majority of data is accessed only by the investigators

    3. The real prize for society is not simply producing open data but facilitating open innovation. Open data enables a situation where the collective genius of thousands of researchers produces insights and analyses, inventions and understanding beyond what isolated individuals with their silos of data could produce.

      Shadbolt on what open data means

    1. Michael Flynn and other advisers to Donald Trump’s campaign were in contact with Russian officials and others with Kremlin ties in at least 18 calls and emails during the last seven months of the 2016 presidential race, current and former U.S. officials familiar with the exchanges told Reuters.

  12. Apr 2017
    1. Taiwanese identity grew more distinct from Mainland China

      Taiwan and its attempts to legitimise itself as a sovereign state seperate from china -

      "Trump infuriated China’s leadership when he spoke to Tsai on the phone and later made separate comments questioning the longstanding “one China” policy, under which the US notionally accepts Beijing’s view that Taiwan is part of China. The US does not officially host Taiwanese leaders. Taiwan has been self-governing and de facto independent since the end of China’s civil war. Beijing regards it as a renegade province".

    2. female president

      Tsai Ing-wen

  13. Mar 2017
  14. Feb 2017
  15. Jan 2017
    1. One of the most alarming aspects of the rise of Trump is (or should have been) his embrace of the Orwellian lie.<br> ...<br> we are not talking about garden variety lying here — we are talking about the totalitarian lie: lies told, repeatedly, loudly and insistently, in direct confrontation with the indisputable truth. Lies purposefully designed to undermine the very capacity to make truth claims.<br> ...<br> It is a plain fact that our political system is compromised. Nowhere is this more evident than in the financial sector and its (non-) oversight, a bipartisan catastrophe two decades in the making<br> ...<br> It is simply not possible to shy away from the ugly fact that racism was an essential ingredient to his election.<br> ...<br> the playing field has changed, empowering some actors at the expense of others. Or put another way: no internet, no Trump.<br> ...<br> The internet is exponentially more pernicious: entry is free, accountability is absent, and — here we are more stupid — the ability of people to distinguish between fact and fiction has virtually vanished. We are living in a post-fact, post-rationalist, post-deliberative society, in which people believe what they want to believe, as if they were selecting items from different columns of a take-out menu.<br> ...<br> from this point forward we will always be the country that elected Donald Trump as President. And as Albert Finney knew all too well in Under the Volcano, “some things, you just can’t apologize for.” This will be felt most acutely on the world stage.

    1. Rep. Jason Chaffetz, who was eager to launch new investigations of Hillary Clinton, doesn't care about Donald Trump's huge, glaring, absurd conflicts of interest. He's even trying to intimidate the director of the Office of Government Ethics for commenting about it.

    1. Jim Arkedis, formerly an intelligence analyst with the DoD.

      Below is how I would assess the credibility of the sources and allegations detailed in Buzzfeed’s recently-released dossier and an explanation of why I believe its two main allegations should be judged on their individual merits as credible with moderate-to-high confidence.

      No, that’s not the same as saying the allegations are 100 percent guaranteed to be true, but I think there’s enough evidence there that it would be irresponsible not to consider how this could impact our nation’s security and what, if anything, can be done to mitigate those potential impacts.

    1. Donald Trump's insane conflicts of interest.

      A report this afternoon from the Wall Street Journal, however, revealed that Trump’s disclosure was the tip of the iceberg. The FEC required Trump only to report debt from entities he fully controls. The disclosure left out “more than $1.5 billion lent to partnerships that are 30%-owned by him.” That debt has been securitized and is owed to at least 150 financial entities.

      These financial institutions include many firms that are under the scrutiny of the federal agencies that Trump will soon control. Wells Fargo, for example, which services over $900 million in loans connected to Trump, “is currently facing scrutiny from federal regulators surrounding its fraudulent sales practices and other issues.”

  16. Dec 2016