1,366 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. I remember reading Matt Bruenig when I was in college, and he was like, “Well, actually Social Security was the most effective pathway to bring people out of poverty.”  I wrote a story in 2017 called “Why Education Is Not the Key to a Good Income,” and it was looking at this growing body of research that showed it was not your level of education that determined your chances of rising economic mobility. It was these other factors—like what kind of industries were in your community, union density, some of it was marriage. 

      makes sense... the best way out of poverty isn't education... it's money.

  2. Jan 2021
    1. ensure the relevance, accuracy and effective communication of its interpretation and education programs (see above for A.O.D.A. requirements) by: establishing clearly defined and measurable learning objectives and outcomes, and undertaking a process of program evaluation using appropriate expertise – including staff, volunteers, community groups, or consultants carrying out research ensure all staff involved in the development and delivery of interpretation and education programs, have the appropriate skills and training

      (2) Volunteer opportunities (programming).

  3. Dec 2020
    1. Remember, children are our future, and the majority of them are B students. If that doesn't scare you, it probably should.

      This a note to parents.

    2. I understand why the top students in America study physics, chemistry, calculus and classic literature. The kids in this brainy group are the future professors, scientists, thinkers and engineers who will propel civilization forward. But why do we make B students sit through these same classes?

      Apple revolutionized music buying and consumption. Education is primed for a shakeup.

    1. It’s no coincidence that we walk when we need to think: evidence shows that movement enhances thinking and learning, and both are activated in the same centre of motor control in the brain. In the influential subfield of cognitive science concerned with ‘embodied’ cognition, one prominent claim is that actions themselves are constitutive of cognitive processes. That is, activities such as playing a musical instrument, writing, speaking or dancing don’t start in the brain and then emanate out to the body as actions; rather, they entail the mind and body working in concert as a creative, integrated whole, unfolding and influencing each other in turn. It’s therefore a significant problem that many of us are trapped in work and study environments that don’t allow us to activate these intuitive cognitive muscles, and indeed often even encourage us to avoid them.

      I'm curious if Lynne Kelly or others have looked into these areas of research with their Memory work? She's definitely posited that singing and dancing as well as creating art helps indigenous cultures in their memory work.

    1. Or maybe a better standard was in the humanitarian world. “There’s a core ethical principle called the responsibility to protect, which is about organizations having a primary responsibility to protect their own personnel,” said Abramowitz. “What’s very clear is that many teachers are distrustful because they have been in deeply unsafe situations for a very long time.” Teachers are asked to deal with school shootings, violent children, aggressive adults, poverty, online bullying—a host of complex social problems that aren’t part of their job description, she said. “Educators are so abandoned, they no longer trust in their own system to protect them.
    1. The wise possum had never read Alexis de Tocqueville’s master work Democracy in America (1835). But whoever wants to understand what is afflicting Western postmodernity—with the U.S. going first and Europe following—should read the two chapters on the tyranny imposed not by an oppressive regime, but by a free society. 200 years ago, the young Frenchman praised America’s “extreme liberties” only to warn of a deadly downside: Nowhere else, he wrote, was there “less independence of mind and true freedom of discussion than in America.”

      The hegemony of the minority. A danger of public schooling that we never saw coming. This hegemony came about by sacrificing the potential of black america. The school system the greatest source of systemic racism..

    1. But by default, reports also let managers drill down into data on individual employees, to find those who participate less in group chat conversations, send fewer emails, or fail to collaborate in shared documents.

      This is going to be awesome when it debuts in universities. I can't imagine that any academics will be concerned when a departmental chair or administrator asks you why you're not sending more emails.

  4. Nov 2020
    1. Nous avons été prof de français. Sommés de nous offusquer des fautes d'orthographe, nous avons été pris pour les curés de la langue. Nous avons écrit pour dédramatiser, pour réfléchir ensemble et puis aussi parce qu'on a toujours pensé que l'Académie Française avait un vrai potentiel comique. "Les deux belges qui veulent simplifier la langue française" : tout est faux dans cette phrase. Pas "simplifier" mais bien faire preuve d'esprit critique, se demander si tout se vaut dans notre orthographe. Pas deux belges, mais bien deux curieux qui veulent transmettre le travail des linguistes de toute la francophonie, pas même la "langue française", seulement son orthographe. Car l'orthographe, c'est pas la langue, c'est juste le code graphique qui permet de la retranscrire. Passion pour les uns, chemin de croix pour les autres, elle est sacrée pour tous. Et pourtant, il ne s'agit peut-être que d'un énorme malentendu. Arnaud Hoedt et Jérôme Piron sont linguistes de formation. Ils ont vécu 25 ans sans se connaître, mais c’était moins bien. Ils ont ensuite enseigné pendant 15 ans dans la même école. Quand Arnaud participe à la rédaction des programmes de français en Belgique, Jérôme se spécialise en médiation culturelle. En 2016, ils écrivent et mettent en scène le spectacle « La Convivialité », au Théâtre National de Bruxelles. Ce spectacle conférence qui traite de la question du rapport dogmatique à l’orthographe tourne depuis 3 ans dans toute la francophonie. Dans la foulée, ils publient l’ouvrage « La faute de l’orthographe », aux éditions Textuel. Ils se définissent comme suit : « Linguistes dilet(t)antes. Pédagogues en (robe de) chambre. Tentent de corriger le participe passé. Écrivent des trucs. Vrais-Faux Comédiens. Bouffeurs d’Académicien ». A la question « est-ce que ça se dit ? « , Arnaud et Jérôme répondent invariablement « oui, tu viens de le faire ». This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at https://www.ted.com/tedx

    1. L’éducation, de l’école à l’université, constitue également un domaine où se concentrent de fortes discriminations et inégalités liées à l’origine, qui trouvent, notamment, leur source dans le fonctionnement des institutions.
    2. L’éducation, de l’école à l’université, constitue un autre lieu névralgique où se concentrent de forts ressentis de discriminations et d’inégalités liées à l’origine
  5. Oct 2020
    1. BTech in design engineering or BTech engineering design: Design thinking is a popular concept that spans multiple industries and there are courses, independent of any branch purely focussing on designing products. This is also often referred to as an engineering design course or design engineering course. The idea is to teach how to not just bring in design to develop great products that are aesthetically perfect and ergonomically usable and consumer-focused but also to introduce design as a tool for innovative thinking. The curriculum develops design thinking concepts in a manner basis which students can conceptualise and develop products that are innovative while also boasting of high aesthetic value. These graduates are sought after by all manufacturing industries.

      Design thinking fosters innovative thinking.

      It involes designing user focused, highly utilitarian and aesthetic products.

    1. Junior school is great because you don’t learn to find a job. You’re at school to grow as a citizen, not to prepare to your future life, and actually you’re better not to think about your future if you don’t want to question yourself about the meaning of your existence. This is the same thing for side projects. See them as a way to discover a new topic and enlarge your horizon, not as something that you could action in your current position or to find a new job.

      Comparing school to side projects

    1. We do not publish small-scale evaluations of specific software/systems in specialist domains or particular courses in individual institutions (unless the findings have broader relevance that is explicitly drawn out in the paper).

      To be considered

    1. In order for a paper to fall within the scope of ACM TOCE, it must clearly address some aspect of  the teaching and learning of computing. Simply using computing students to study a general educational phenomenon is generally not enough. 

      To take into account

    1. The flipped meeting — pioneered by innovative companies like Amazon and LinkedIn, and built on the model of the flipped classroom that has been rolled out in universities across the country and around the world.  Flipping your meetings can help you win back time wasted in meetings, ensure that every meeting you attend is productive, and empower your teams to collaboratively make smarter, timelier decisions. See how, in our complete guide to flipping your meetings.
    1. By some measures distance education students are somewhat less prepared (e.g. fewer of them attended private high schools) but still have a better chance of graduating college than students who do not take distance education courses. Put simply, at a national level, even potentially less prepared students who participated in distance education early in their college careers were more likely to attain a degree than students who had not done so.

      A followup to studies of community college students in Virginia and Washington, this national study found that students who enrolled in online classes early in their college careers were more likely to complete their degrees. This was true even though students in online classes are somewhat less prepared than those in in person classes. One difference may be that this study was published a few years after the Virginia one, and more students were enrolled in online classes by then. 9/10

    1. But there is an alternative. The “flipped meeting” approach is revolutionary in its simplicity: Share the informational presentation before the meeting so participants are fully informed up front Focus the meeting on making decisions, opening discussion, and getting work done in the meeting, not afterwards This handbook includes a guide to developing a flipped meeting culture in your organization, including: Pre-meeting communication and information sharing needs In-meeting group management and best practices Ideas for using video to make flipped meetings more efficient Flipping your meetings can help you win back time wasted in meetings, ensure that every meeting you attend is productive, and empower your teams to collaboratively make smarter, timelier decisions.

      Flipped meeting solves for the unengaging long lecture.

    1. While scholars have applied the assumptions of andragogy to inform quality online course design, this work proposes that an online course designed using sound pedagogical principles can exhibit a learning experience beneficial to adult learners.

      This short article links Anderson and McCormick's pedagogical principles for online learning with Knowles' andragogical assumptions about adult learning. 8/10

    1. Accordingly, our results strongly suggest thatonlineinstructionin keyintroductorycollege-level courses, at least as currently practiced, maynot be aseffectiveasface-to-faceinstructionat2-yearcommunitycolleges.

      According to a study done across all Virginia Community Colleges, students who signed up for gatekeeper courses (basic English and Math) online did less well in those courses than did their peers who took the same classes in person. There was a higher attrition rate in the online classes as well. Students who came in with good GPAs tended to do well in online courses, but those who were struggling with academics did worse than they probably would have in person. Many statistics are included. 9/10

    1. In order to inform the development and implementation of effective online learning environments, this study was designed to explore both instructors' and students' online learning experiences while enrolled in various online courses. The study investigated what appeared to both support and hinder participants' online teaching and learning experiences.

      The authors discuss the issue of community and engagement in online graduate programs. They carried out a small case study and used a Cognitive Apprenticeship Model to examine a successful program in Higher Education. They found that students feel too many online classes are just reading and writing, regurgitating rather than applying, and lack sufficient connection with the instructor and with other students, They recommend some strategies to fix that, but admit that more work is needed. 9/10

    1. In an interview, he described how these emerging support systems engage students and evaluate their strengths and weaknesses, even when they’re not in the classroom. The systems are not an online course, but rather an online tutor, driven by artificial intelligence, that can assess a student’s strengths and weaknesses and deliver personalized individual instruction.

      An interview with Zachary Pardos, a professor at UC Berkeley who is creating adaptive tutoring software. He describes how he thinks technology and the pandemic will change education over the next several years. He expects greater accessibility to wireless provided like school buses, greater use and development of adaptive tutoring software, and more online learning. I'd need more information on how the system deals with students who don't get it - do they have multiple explanations for math, or just one? 5/10

    1. Higher education institutions need to address these challenges, and technological tools — even some surprisingly simple ones — can go a long way toward enhancing the college experience for older students, says Brian Fleming, executive director of the Sandbox ColLABorative at Southern New Hampshire University.

      Older students (over 25) are often changing careers. They tend to have more responsibilities than traditional college students, and a lower threshold for micro-frustrations like bureaucracy, form. Colleges should accommodate them with things like digital signatures and virtual meeting availability. Technology should be platform-agnostic for them (and everyone). 5/10

    2. Technology Can Help Adult Learners Get the Most Out of Higher Ed

      (Available as transcript or podcast.) This article reviews the definition of the adult learner, identifying their particular learning needs and challenges. Considerations and recommendations for implementing technology are discussed (agnostic software, alleviate micro-frustrations). 5/10

    1. While our program still faces some challenges around engaging our students and keeping them enrolled in programs long enough to complete their goals, technology has allowed us to make some remarkable strides.

      A school system that extends to adult education utilizes online apps as an option (but doesn't require internet access, as many people lack it at home). They have found them to be helpful, especially because people who work odd shift jobs and have burst of time at odd hours can get some practice in. This is most helpful for ESL learners. 6/10

    1. We eventually hope to create affect-sensitive learning environments that respond constructively and effectively to boredom and confusion. When we do, we will have made significant progress towards improving students’ learning experiences, reducing problem behaviors such as gaming the system, managing students’ frustration and confusion in the face of impasses, and ultimately improving students’ learning.

      Researchers studied students cognitive-affective states doing online learning in 3 separate, very different studies, among different student populations, ranging from 12-year-olds to college students. They found that, contrary to prior assumptions, frustration did not necessarily have negative learning outcomes. Boredom tended to last longest of the cognitive-affective states covered, led to the greatest attempts to game the system, and had the least successful learning outcomes. Confusion was sometimes beneficial and sometimes harmful. Therefore, online learning environments should be developed that guard against boredom and perhaps confusion, rather than frustration. 8/10

    1. Therefore, practitioners need to be cognisant of the important role they play in influenc-ing learner motivation when designing learning activities. Most importantly, the relevance and value of the task (e.g., online discussions) need to be clearly identified and linked to learning objectives to help learners understand how the activity can aid in the realisation of personal goals, aspirations, and interests, both in the short and longer term.

      Based on research and two small scale case studies, some students in online learning are intrinsically motivated, but others need to be motivated by the teacher and material. External influences such as deadlines and grades also influenced student motivation. Identified regulation, that is, knowing why the activity is valuable and important, make a very big difference in student motivation. This brings us back to the andragogical idea that the assignments should involve real-world situations and be applicable to students' lives. 9/10

    1. Online learning environments have a promising future for researchers, practitioners, and learners. However designing and developing more effective and efficient online learning environments is possible with ongoing research and development. This paper offers four research goals and matches four existing methodologies to improve student outcomes in online learning environments defined as learner achievement, engagement, and retention.

      The authors outline four general research goals, and then go into detail on some of the questions that should be researched within those areas. They then suggest four methodologies to use in designing students to research those questions: formative, developmental, and experimental research and activity theory. All of these could help include online learning in terms of learner achievement, engagement, and retention. 9/10

    1. Technology integration has also been shown to help create more authentic learning environments where the students are more motivated to attend, have a greater chance of communication and collaboration and have more opportunities to use higher order thinking and problem solving skills connected to real world applications (Fouts, 2000) This has led some to believe that new theories in learning needed to be developed that would help to support the creation of such learning environments. The three emerging theories discussed in this paper all possess the ability to support the creation of such learning environments.  They all support the idea that learning is through action.  They all support that cognition happens through communication and collaboration with others.  They all support the use of technology to help in the creation of such learning environments. It is through these new theories that learning environments, which support the development of these higher-level learning skills, can be created.  

      This appears to be a paper written by an upper-level undergraduate (based on the writing), describing the importance of technology in 21st century education and describing three cognitive theories, all requiring collaborative learning, The author highlights the importance of student engagement through technology, which students like, and assumes its importance in the workplace. 5/10

    1. Research about adults as learners can inform the design of effective digital learning experiences. Although there is no one principle that can be applied to all adults, the design principles outlined here are based on five of the prevailing theories about how adults learn: andragogy, experiential learning, self-directed learning, transformational learning, and neuroscience.

      This article applies the principles of andragogy, self directed learning, experiential learning, transformational learning, and neuroscience (all of which seem rather similar), to low-skilled adults, who are likely to lack confidence about learning and who may be learning in bits of free time via cell phone. Emphasizes the importance of an instructor or coach, along with good use of technology. 8/10

    1. Faculty need to focus on learning theory in the design of instructional technology so that they can create lessons that are not only technology-effective but that are meaningful from the learner’s standpoint.

      Fidishun, a librarian and Penn State's satellite campuses, expands Knowles' 6 assumptions of andragogy, and draws out some of their implications for technology-based instruction for adults. This is short and to the point, but readers would benefit from the writer going into greater details. 7/10

    1. ​Institutions that were primarily online before the pandemic are also doing well. At colleges where more than 90 percent of students took courses solely online pre-pandemic, enrollments are growing for both undergraduate (6.8 percent) and graduate students (7.2 percent).
    1. JVER v29n1 - Analysis of Technology Integration in the Teaching-Learning Process in Selected Career and Technical Education Programs

      This looks at the application of technology in career and technical education programs for adults. It looks at how and how often technology is used in these programs. 8/10, interesting and focused on technical education unlike most articles.

    1. Technology planning: A roadmap to successful technology integration in schools

      This article talks about why, when institutions have prioritized and invested a lot of money in teaching adults to utilize technology in the classroom, there are very little successful instances of integration of technology in classrooms. 5/10, not particularly interesting to me and targeted towards a specific group of adult learners.

    1. DEVELOPMENT ARTICLEA systems-based approach to technology integrationusing mentoring and communities of practice

      This article presents a model of technology integration at the system level formed around mentoring. It focuses on effective methods of teacher professional development in the area of technology integration and discusses overcoming various obstacle teachers face during adult learning/ education. 6/10, very narrow focus of adult learners.

    1. TECHNOLOGY INTEGRATIONTHROUGH PROFESSIONAL LEARNING COMMUNITY

      This article examines the effectiveness of learning communities to support integration of technology into classrooms and effective teacher growth in the area of technology proficiencies. 5/10, learning community findings are useful but this source is very targeted towards a specific group of adult learners.

    1. Technology Andragogy Work Content Knowledge Model as a New Framework in Vocational Education: Revised Technology Pedagogy Content Knowledge Model

      This article focuses on using adult education theory to integrate technology into vocational education. This expands adult learning opportunities to community colleges and trade schools. 8/10 interesting and different from an equity and accessibility standpoint.

    1. Language Research Bulletin,32, ICU, TokyoAndragogy in the 21st century: Applying the Assumptions of Adult Learning Online

      This article emphasizes the importance of creating online programs that have learning objectives that correspond to learners' real-world needs. It examines Knowles' Andragogical Model to provide guidelines for incorporating adult learning principles into course design. 10/10, very good blend of strategy and theory.

    1. A Comprehensive Exploration of Technology's RoleIin Adult Learning

      This article examines and gives bit of information from a book covering the intersection of adult learning and technology innovation. 4/10, while there is information here it is certainly not the entire book and therefore incomplete. It does serve as a quick and accessible alternative for those seeking the books information but lacking the time/ access to read the book.

    1. Pre-service Teachers' Practices towards Digital Game Design for Technology Integration into Science Classrooms

      This article looks at yet another new technology that has the potential to revolutionize the adult learning field. It examines the results of teaching educators about digital game design for technology integration. It looked at integrating this technology into science classrooms in particular. 9/10, very interesting new technology with lots of potential implications in the adult learning field.

    1. Application of augmented reality technologies for education projects preparation

      This article is on the cutting edge of educational technology. It discusses the potential benefits of augmented or enriched reality in education. While this article focuses on studies conducted using teaching practices in a college classroom with college students, it is reasonable to assume that this technology would have great potential for adult education too. 9/10 extremely exciting and interesting potential future technology for adult education.

    1. Teaching, Technology, and Teacher Education During the COVID-19 Pandemic:

      This article (or at least the section of it presented here) describes one institutions 5-phase model of virtual learning . It examines the state of teacher preparation and professional development in terms of technology and determines that while progress is being made, it is slow and needs to be implemented and focused on more. 4/10, the article itself is not great but it does include an extensive list of references that may be of use later.

    1. Integrating academic and everyday learning through technology: Issues and challenges for researchers, policy makers and practitioners

      This article examines the potential to connect academic with knowledge learned through life and career experience using technology and other traditional methods. Challenges and best practices are presented and all levels of individual and institution are included in the discussion. Rating 8/10. Very interesting idea and cool how many levels of organization are included.

  6. dergipark.org.tr dergipark.org.tr
    1. Blueprint for In-Service Teacher Training Program in Technology Integration

      This article looks at the gap between teacher efficiency in in-person versus online teaching and the need to effectively build teachers' competencies in the are of technology to ensure teachers are not incompetent at teaching online. This study collected data from 122 English language teachers and used the findings to create a blueprint for other institutions hoping to increases teachers' ability to successfully integrate technology into their lessons. 6/10, the study was too small to be truly persuasive scientifically and the findings were more helpful for institutions rather than individual educators.

    1. Toward a Future Adult Learning Community: If Sacra tes Had a PC. .. Toward a Future Adult Learning Community: If Socrates had a PC ...

      In this article both socratic and invisible integration approaches of technology in adult education are examined in an effort to propose a framework for future adult learning communities. Rating is 2/10, this article is much older than anticipated (somehow snuck through the date filter) and was rather outdated given how much technology has changed.

    1. The Impact of Social Media Technologies on Adult Learning

      This article takes on the challenge of investigating what role social media technologies have in adult learning/ their impact on learning outcomes for adult learners. The data showed that social media technologies follow similar patterns to other educational tools. Teaching method used in conjunction with the technology matters significantly. This being said, the article does make several recommendations for using social media in the classroom to boost adult learning outcomes. 10/10 interesting and relevant article with easy to find and utilize recommendations educators could implement.

    1. Teaching with Web 2.0 Technologies: Benefits, Barriers and Lessons Learned

      In this article, the author defines Web 2.0 technology and use for Web 2.0 in higher education. Through a small study of educators, discovery includes advantages, obstacles, and general guidance for implementation of web 2.0 tools. The author supports use of Web 2.0 to supplement learning, not as a substitute for the educator. Technologies must be implemented strategically and purposefully. 7/10

    1. Social Media and Networking Technologies: An Analysis of Collaborative Work and Team Communication

      Trends in Web 2.0 technologies and various networking modalities are briefly reviewed. Furthermore, advantages and barriers in the use of said technologies are discussed. Implementation of social media as a learning tool can be advantageous, however, it must supplement learning, not replace a structured environment. The educator should still remain present in the learning environment. And, he/she should provide appropriate support and training, as well as model, respective online tools to ensure efficacy. 6/10

    1. How To Make Online Corporate Learning Fun During Lockdown

      (Available in text or audio.) This article provides basic principles (agenda, duration) and technologies (gamification, discussion boards) and activities to keep employees engaged in online learning. While this provides strategy, it does not provide implementation guidance within the corporate environment. (2/10)

    1. Blended learning: Efficient, timely and cost effective

      (Click Download full-text PDF to read.) In this article, the authors discuss the blended learning instructional delivery method. Through case study, the authors demonstrate the benefits of blended course design. Furthermore, the article addresses potential detriments (financial, instructional design) of a blended course design. A brief review of considerations and recommendations for a blended design was provided. Though this article focuses on the relationship to forensic science, the information is applicable across disciplines and delivery venues (corporate, academic). (6/10)

    1. E-Learning Implications for Adult Learning

      (Click Download full text to read.) In this brief article, the authors contrast the child and adult learner. Highlighting the adult learner's characteristics, the article further discusses factors that might affect the individual learning style. Furthermore, the authors discuss these styles in the context of eLearning (extravert, introvert, sensory type, intuitive adult, reflexive type, affective type, rational type, and perceptive type). Each learning type and preferred eLearning method is illustrated (Table 1, p. 60). Rationale for the implementation of eLearning is detailed (p. 61). Guidelines for the use of eLearning is discussed. (6/10)

    1. Technology and Adult Students In Higher Education: A Review of the Literature

      Article explores technology usage among adult learners in higher education and how to optimize learning outcomes via tech tools in these settings. The author addresses educational/instructional design and the need for instructors to modify traditional approaches. Rating 6/10

    1. Features and characteristics of problem based learning

      The problem based learning (PBL) strategy is defined. The strategy is defined as an iterative process with specific goals (knowledge, problem-solving skills, self-directed skills, collaboration, motivation for learning). The authors go on to describe the advantages, disadvantages, limitations, and considerations for the use of PBL. Integration of technology allows for new opportunities in education and training across disciplines. (7/10)

  7. nevadasadulteducationcommunity.wdfiles.com nevadasadulteducationcommunity.wdfiles.com
    1. Integrating Technologyinto Adult Learning

      The author discusses four strategies (curriculum, mechanism, complement to instruction, instructional tool) for integrating technology in adult learning, their advantages and considerations. The use of any method will require changes to a curriculum, learning environment, and learner and educator roles. Therefore, technology integration should be done purposefully. 7/10

    1. Project Based Learning to Develop 21st Century Competencies

      In this chapter, the author defines problem based learning (PBL) and highlights the benefits to the learner. In addition to incorporating technology to enhance learning, the article reinforces the need to foster the softer skills that may be developed as a result of PBL (teamwork, accountability, problem-solving, creative thinking, risk-taking, communication skills, and critical thinking skills). Though the data is limited, and there are inherent challenges, PBL is of value in course design. (8/10)

    1. An Evaluation of Problem-based Learning Supported by Information and Communication Technology: A Pilot Study

      (Under "Viewing Options", select PDF.) In this article, Ernawaty and Sujono (2019) summarize results of a study funded by the Research and Higher Education Directorate of Indonesia. The study aimed to evaluate the cogency of information and communication technologies (ICTs) in problem based learning (PBL) and traditional teaching methods (TTM) based upon learner test scores. The concepts of PBL, TTM, and implications of ICTs are briefly reviewed. Results of the study revealed that PBL with the support of an ICT yielded the highest test scores. (6/10)

    1. Une authentique dérogation est à noter: la loi du 15 mars 2004 a introduit l’interdiction du « port de signes ou de tenues » manifestant « ostensiblement une appartenance religieuse » pour les élèves des écoles, collèges et lycées publics, qui sont des usagers du service public de l’éducation. Ainsi, les signes et tenues interdits sont ceux dont le port conduit à se faire immédiatement reconnaître par son appartenance religieuse, tels que le foulard, la kippa ou une croix de dimension manifestement excessive. La loi ne remet pas en cause le droit des élèves de porter des signes religieux discrets.Il est à noter que cette interdiction, strictement limitée aux écoles collèges et lycées publics, ne s’applique pas dans l’enseignement supérieur,et notamment au sein de l’université, que les élèves, usagers, sont libres de fréquenter en revendiquant leur religion, sous réserve, classiquement, de ne pas troubler l’ordre public.
    1. Grant Potter

      Seeing the commentary from Greg McVerry and Aaron Davis, it's probably worthwhile to point you to the IndieWeb for Education wiki page which has some useful resources, pointers, and references. As you have time, feel free to add yourself to the list along with any brainstorming ideas you might have for using some of this technology within your work realm. Many hands make light work. Welcome to the new revolution!

    1. The architecture of the platform where I published allowed authorial control of content but could not control context collapse or social interactions.

      These are pieces which the IndieWeb should endeavor to experiment in and attempt to fix. Though I will admit that pieces of the IndieWeb layers on top of platforms like WordPress can help to mitigate some context collapse and aggregate social interactions better. (eg: reply context and POSSE)

    2. Institutions, publics, and some media elites are encouraging academics to be more visible in the public sphere.

      I can't help but be reminded of the early professoriate in the 1400's when teachers were expected to be well known or interesting enough to have their own local following and pull in their own individual students. If they weren't the right sort of thought leaders or didn't teach the "right" subjects, they failed as teachers and were kicked out of the university. Social media in this era would have been more interesting whereas, now it barely seems to be a direct economic factor. (cross reference O. Gingerich, The Book Nobody Read)

    3. There is a sense that one can cobble together a common public by overlapping various social media platforms and audiences. Many of my colleagues are doing a fine job of problematizing the intersections of private social media and the university. The larger project from which this essay is drawn is part of that emerging conversation.

      I wonder here what role an IndieWeb-based version of academe looks like in which teachers all own their content on their own websites to make a more explicit appeal of work that they've done. Compare this with the concept that what they may be doing on Twitter isn't "work" and which isn't judged as such.

    4. Scholars who are also members of marginalized groups disproportionately take up this kind of engaged scholarship, often without commensurate credit from university administrators or colleagues (Ellison and Eatmen 2008; Park 1996; Stanley 2006; Taylor and Raeburn 1995; Turner et al 2008; Villalpando and Bernal 2002).
    1. As I read this while thinking about the context of the IndieWeb and it's wiki, I'm thinking two cognitively dissonant thoughts: 1. The current technical uses are creating content more for themselves and their research and use and 2. They're not creating it to help out the users who may necessarily need a ladder or a bigger platform to get to where they are.

      It's going to take a layer of intermediate users, creators, or builders to help create a better path to bring the neophytes up to a higher level to get more out of the wealth of information that's hiding in it. Or it's going to take helpers and mentors to slowly build them up to that point.

      How can we more consistently reach a hand down to pull up those coming after us? How can we encourage others to do some of the same?

    1. When you can assume that all the materials you’re using in and with your class are open educational resources, here’s one way to remix the effective practices listed above with OER in order to provide you and your students with opportunities to spend your time and effort on work that makes the world a better place instead of wasting it on disposable assignments.

      As I think of remix, reuse, redistribute and things like git and version control, I also can't help but think that being able to send and receive webmentions in the process of reusing and redistribution with referential links back to the originals will allow the original creator to at least be aware of the changes and their existence to potentially manually add them to the original project. (Manually because they may not (yet) know how to keep their content under source control or allow others to do so and send pull requests.)

    1. As I'm reading this page I can't help but think about how it potentially predates and underlies the idea of the wiki which came just a few years after this piece of software.

    1. It is our belief that Wikimedia projects are a valuable tool for education, and that engagement with those projects is an activity which enriches the student experience as much as it does the open web itself. Educators worldwide are using Wikimedia in the curriculum – teaching students key skills in information literacy, collaboration, writing as public outreach, information synthesis, source evaluation and data science. Engaging with projects like Wikipedia – particularly through becoming a contributor – enables learners to understand, navigate and critically evaluate information as well as develop an appreciation for the role and importance of open education. Once published, material produced by students becomes immediately accessible by a global audience, giving students the satisfaction of knowing that their work can be seen by many more people than just their tutor. As individuals working in the open web in the twenty-first century it is incumbent upon us to embrace innovative learning, embedding into our practice those tools which equip our students to work collaboratively, be skilled digitally, and think critically.

      This would generally apply to almost any wiki product. In part, it's why I maintain a personal wiki on the open web.

    1. Reversing the trend toward privatization will thus require not just massive public mobilization and demand of elected officials, but also a hard turn away from efficiency as a primary value, a recognition that the building of relationships and the cultivation of care is slow and difficult and of necessity inefficient. In fact, that its value lies in its inefficiency — but making the case for such inefficiency as a necessary value requires a lot of effort, and a lot of caution.

      There's a kernel here of something about the value of links (social, business, etc.) as put forward by Cesar Hidalgo in Why Information Grows. Where is the real value? How can it best be extracted? Built up? Having a more direct means of valuing these otherwise seeming intangibles will be important in the future.

    2. Throughout Generous Thinking, one of my interests lies in the effects of, and the need to reverse, the shift in our cultural understanding of education (and especially higher education); where in the mid-twentieth century, the value of education was largely understood to be social, it has in recent decades come to be described as providing primarily private, individual benefits. And this, inevitably, has accompanied a shift from education being treated as a public service to being treated as a private responsibility.
    3. This displacement is of course operative in the de-funding of public universities, effectively transforming them into non-profits rather than state institutions. The effects of this program of neoliberal1 reform run deep, not least that the dominant motivator behind these privatized institutions becomes sustainability rather than service, leaving universities, like non-profits, in an endless cycle of fundraising and budget cuts.
    1. There must be an ‘industrial revolution’ in education

      This first phrase is the most telling of all the issues we deal with on the edtech front. Because the industrial revolution touched almost every aspect of life since its inception, everyone presumes that it must also affect education.

      Sadly other than helping to make searching for and obtaining material much quicker, it still needs to be consumed, thought about, and digested by a student. The industrial revolution simply hasn't increased the bandwith of the common student's brain. It's unlikely that anything in the near future will expand it.

    1. Students like the convenience of the system, said Anderson, and all have access to the most up-to-date content, instead of some students having different editions of the same textbook.

      They're also touting the most up-to-date content here, when it's an open secret that for the majority of textbooks don't really change that much from edition to edition.

    2. A key difference between inclusive access and buying print textbooks is that students effectively lease the content for the duration of their course, rather than owning the material. If students want to download the content to access it beyond the duration of their course, there is often an additional fee.

      So now we need to revisit the calculation above and put this new piece of data into the model.

      Seriously?! It's now a "rental price"?

    3. She said that her institution, which has inclusive-access agreements with more than 25 publishers, had saved students more than $2 million this semester alone.

      $ 2million compared to what? To everyone having purchased the textbooks at going rates before? This is a false comparison because not everyone bought new in the first place. Many bought used, and many more still probably either pirated, borrowed from a friend, from the library, or simply went without.

    4. The "inclusive" aspect of the model means that every student has the same materials on the first day of class, with the charge included as part of their tuition.

      It almost sounds to me like they know they're not getting a cut of the money from poorer students who are finding the material for free online anyway, so they're trying to up the stakes of the piece of pie that they're getting from a different angle.

      This other model of subscription at the level of the college or university is also one that they're well aware of based on involvement with subscription fees for journal access.

    1. Pearson, the publisher whose Texas textbook raises questions about the quality of Harlem Renaissance literature, said such language “adds more depth and nuance.”

      If they wanted to add more "depth and nuance" wouldn't they actually go into greater depth on the topic by adding pages instead of subtly painting it such a discouraging light?

      But Texas students will read that some critics “dismissed the quality of literature produced.”

    1. Finally, the best HyFlex classrooms have someone assisting the faculty member.

      This is the understatement of the year. Faculty members will require extensive training and LOTS of assistance. This assistance SHOULD NOT come from student assistants, graduate students (who are likely to be heavily undertrained), or other "free" sources.

    2. It’s important to note that the goal of HyFlex is two make both the online and in-person experiences equal.

      There are some pieces of this that immediately make me think that this model is more of a sort of "separate, but equal" sort of modality. Significant resources will need to go toward the equality piece and even then it is likely to fall short from a social perspective.

    3. These assistants could also be work-study students who are assigned a particular classroom (or digital space) or they might be volunteers from class who are given credit for assisting in the delivery of the course.

      And of course, the first pivot (even in the same paragraph!) is exactly to these "free" or cheap sources which are likely to be overlooked and undertrained.

      If a school is going to do this they need to take it seriously and actually give it professional resources.

    4. This fall needs to be different. We need to ask students to be part of the solution of keeping learning flourishing in the fall. This includes asking them to help manage the class if it has a virtual component.

      This is moving education in exactly the WRONG direction. Students are already ill-prepared to do the actual work and studying of education, now we're going to try to extract extra efficiency out of the system by asking them to essential teach themselves on top of it? This statement seems like the kind of thing a technology CEO would pitch higher education on as a means of monetizing something over which they had no control solely to extract value for their own company.

      If we're going to go this far, why not just re-institute slavery?

    1. “Professional development often meant filling in to an auditorium and being talked at from a stage,” says Ferguson.

      Naturally, because you know, educators know how to educate other educators, right?!

    1. "There’s one great quote that’s attributed to Confucius: 'I hear and I forget, I see and I remember, I do and I understand,'" says Case. "I really believe in the potential of the interactive mediums."

      This is related to the broad idea of modality shifts in more modern educational contexts.

    1. Learning and Teaching Letter Grades are the Enemy of Authentic & Humane Learning: Bernard Bull discusses how grades work against authentic and self-determined learning. Although they are ingrained in education, he recommends considering the aspects of life free from grades and having these conversations with others. What is interesting is this is only one post being shared at the moment. Bill Ferriter shared his concerns about the association between standard grades and fixed mindset, while Will Richardson argues that grades only matter because we choose to let them matter.This continues some of the points discussed in Clive Rose’s book The End of Average and Jesse Stommell’s presentation on grades and the LMS. It is also something that Templestowe College has touched in the development of alternative pathways to higher education.

      Thanks for aggregating a variety of sources here!

      I'd recently come across Robert Talbert's post <cite>Traditional Grading: The Great Demotivator</cite> which likely fits into this same sub-topic.