523 Matching Annotations
  1. Jan 2021
    1. In fact, such small effectively closed scientific communities built on interpersonal relationships already exist to some extent

      so the weights in the reputation graph are personal knowledge, not citations or whatever.

  2. Dec 2020
    1. introduction and in its summary at the end: “a graph of data intended to accumulate and convey knowledge of the real world, whose nodes represent entities of interest and whose edges represent relations between these entities”. We

      comprehensive definition

    2. but these same vendors were also talking about Semantic Web and Linked Data capabilities before that, so I thought that they were just rebranding with the new buzz phrase as a marketing strategy.

      Maybe the vendor dependency is one of the problems.

    1. Put yourself in the reader’s position and see if you can get a grip on how they might respond to your writing.

      It seems like good advice but it's actually quite hard to divorce yourself from what you know. See the curse of knowledge.

      This is why I think that having this list of questions is a good idea; you don't have to rely solely on putting yourself in the reader's shoes.

    1. They should be well-organized and easy for customers to locate the information they need. 

      This articles focused on the structure of knowledge bases, whereas the Hubspot intro is focused on the features they provide.

    1. More than anything, however, consumers want to find answers on their own. A study by Forrester confirmed that customers prefer knowledge bases over all other self-service channels. This is likely because the vast majority of customers want an immediate response to their customer service question — 90%, in fact.
    1. A knowledge base (KB) is a technology used to store complex structured and unstructured information used by a computer system. The initial use of the term was in connection with expert systems; which were the first knowledge-based systems.
  3. Nov 2020
    1. arising from the mixing bowl was sweet,                                                    [210] astonishingly so—to tell the truth, no one’s heart could then refuse to drink it.

      In the satyr play Cyclopes by Euripides', this mixing bowl is magical and never stops flowing with wine.

    2. He said this to throw me off, but his deceit                                        370 could never fool me. I was too clever. And so I gave him a misleading answer:

      Another line of dialogue that would have had a god like Athena interject to suggest the use of cunning. In this case compared to the Iliad which gives us insight on how the author is different. Thoughts are described and this could be because the story revolves around Odysseus, a man who uses wit rather then strength which makes the author use more internal thoughts and explanations.

    3. As he spoke, our hearts collapsed, terrified by his deep voice and monstrous size. But still, I answered him and said:

      Compared to the Iliad this was the first case where emotions were used to describe a characters feelings before dialogue. This is usually done through the use of god characters.

    4. Resourceful Odysseus then replied to Alcinous:

      Epithets are often used with Odysseus and specifically when he is about to do an interaction with another character in the story.

    1. Knowledge graphs combine characteristics of several data management paradigms: Database, because the data can be explored via structured queries; Graph, because they can be analyzed as any other network data structure; Knowledge base, because they bear formal semantics, which can be used to interpret the data and infer new facts.

      Characteristics / benefits of a knowledge graph

    1. The ontology data model can be applied to a set of individual facts to create a knowledge graph – a collection of entities, where the types and the relationships between them are expressed by nodes and edges between these nodes, By describing the structure of the knowledge in a domain, the ontology sets the stage for the knowledge graph to capture the data in it.

      How ontologies and knowledge graphs relate.

    1. Almost all interfaces today, with the exception of TheBrain visual user interface, are limited to organizing information into hierarchies, where a piece of information can only be categorized into one place. For simple applications this is fine, but for users engaging in more complex business processes, it is simply inadequate. A document will have a variety of different issues or people associated with it – with hierarchies one cannot show all these relationships without multiple copies of the information.

      Shelley Hayduk also identifies the issue that most information management software uses a file cabinet metaphor (i.e. hierarchy). This has the limitation that a piece of information can only be categorized in one place. For more complex things, this is inadequate.

    1. An ontology is as a formal, explicit specification of a sharedconceptualization that is characterized by high semantic ex-pressiveness required for increased complexity [9]. Ontolog-ical representations allow semantic modeling of knowledge,and are therefore commonly used as knowledge bases in artifi-cial intelligence (AI) applications, for example, in the contextof knowledge-based systems. Application of an ontology asknowledge base facilitates validation of semantic relationshipsand derivation of conclusions from known facts for inference(i.e., reasoning) [9]

      Definition of an ontology

    2. A knowledge graph acquires and integrates infor-mation into an ontology and applies a reasonerto derive new knowledge.

      Definition of a Knowledge Graph

    1. methodology

      Es importante el carácter que posee de "libre" una pregunta en la observación y la comunicación que se debe hacer en este tipo de investigación, sin duda, las preguntas que emergen en el momento y que podemos llamar improvisadas son capaces de dar nuevos enfoques a lo que estas buscando, profundizar o encontrar algo inesperado en las respuestas de las personas. Me parece curioso como este dato demuestra explícitamente la sorpresa de la investigación, que puede ser inesperada.

    1. When you’re implementing a bad plan yourself, instead of having a mentor bail you out by fixing it, a few really useful things happen:You learn many more details about why it was a bad idea. If someone else tells you your plan is bad, they’ll probably list the top two or three reasons. By actually following through, you’ll also get to learn reasons 4–1,217.You spend about 100x more time thinking about how you’ll avoid ever making that type of mistake again, i.e., digesting what you’ve learned and integrating it into your overall decision-making.By watching my mistakes and successes play out well or badly over the course of months, I was able to build much more detailed, precise models about what does and doesn’t matter for long-term codebase health. Eventually, that let me make architectural decisions with much more conviction.

      There's a benefit to embarking on a challenge without a more experienced authority to bail you out.

      • You learn many more details about why it's a bad idea.
      • The lessons you learn in terms of how to avoid the mistakes you made stick with you longer

      (I would add that the experience is more visceral, it activates more modalities in your brain, and you remember it much more clearly.)

      These types of experiences result in what the author calls more "detailed, precise models". For me they result in a sort of intuition.

  4. Oct 2020
    1. In the past two decades, the policy concept of a knowledge economy hasincreasingly become an object of knowledge and governance

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    Annotators

    1. down ambrosia,

      Ambrosia was known as the food of the Gods and was thought to confer immortality to those who ate it. It is really interesting here that Poseidon is giving Ambrosia to his horses.

    2. The Trojans came on in a mass, led by Hector,                                   160 always charging forward, like a rolling boulder, which some river in a winter flood dislodges from a cliff beside its banks, its great flood eroding what supports that lethal stone.

      Using a simile to explain how massive the charge Hector is leading with the Trojan army. Like a boulder they will smash into the water where the Greeks are and destroy everything as if creating a flood.

    3. Thus Zeus brought Hector and the Trojans to the ships. Then he left the soldiers there to carry on their strife, their wretched endless war.

      Homer using the gods again to explain the thought processes and actions of the mortals. In this case, where Hector leads his troops towards the Greek ships. Zeus is leading them the right way. The chose being made as Zeus giving them instructions.

    1. Pre-service Teachers' Practices towards Digital Game Design for Technology Integration into Science Classrooms

      This article looks at yet another new technology that has the potential to revolutionize the adult learning field. It examines the results of teaching educators about digital game design for technology integration. It looked at integrating this technology into science classrooms in particular. 9/10, very interesting new technology with lots of potential implications in the adult learning field.

    1. Integrating academic and everyday learning through technology: Issues and challenges for researchers, policy makers and practitioners

      This article examines the potential to connect academic with knowledge learned through life and career experience using technology and other traditional methods. Challenges and best practices are presented and all levels of individual and institution are included in the discussion. Rating 8/10. Very interesting idea and cool how many levels of organization are included.

    1. Preservice Teacher Experience with Technology Integration: How the Preservice Teacher’s Effica-cy in Technology Integration is Impactedby the Context of the Preservice Teacher Education Pro-gram

      This article discusses the need for teacher education to focus just as much on technology knowledge (regardless of grade level taught) as on educational theory and methods. It argues that teachers cannot be effective if they are not trained in not only current technologies, but also taught to be familiar with navigating new technologies as the emerge. 5/10 Very specific to K-12 teacher education.

    1. Microlearning: Knowledge management applications and competency-based training in the workplace

      Lynn C. Emerson, & Zane L. Berge. (2018). Microlearning: Knowledge management applications and competency-based training in the workplace. Knowledge Management & E-Learning: An International Journal, 10(2), 125–132.

      https://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&AuthType=shib&db=edsdoj&AN=edsdoj.8793b57070bd45918c6e0875f40ced31&site=eds-live&scope=site&custid=uphoenix

      The focus of this article is a threefold discussion on microlearning 1) how microlearning best practices facilitate knowledge acquisition in the workplace by engaging and motivating employees through short, personalized, just-in-time learning, 2) ways microlearning integrates with knowledge management applications through situational mentoring, and 3) how competency-based microlearning, via subscription learning, is both an innovative approach to e-learning and an asset to learning organizations focused on improving the performance of their employees.

      8/10

    1. Workplace Learning: The Roles of Knowledge Accessibility and Management

      Li, J., Brake, G., Champion, A., Fuller, T., Gabel, S., & Hatcher-Busch, L. (2009). Workplace Learning: The Roles of Knowledge Accessibility and Management. Journal of Workplace Learning, 21(4), 347–364.

      https://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&AuthType=shib&db=eric&AN=EJ842625&site=eds-live&scope=site&custid=uphoenix

      Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine how knowledge management systems have been used by the studied organizations to improve knowledge accessibility and knowledge sharing in order to increase workplace learning. Design/methodology/approach: The study relies on a qualitative multisite case study method. Data were obtained from five organizations at a southern state in the USA. Multiple interviews, onsite observation, and documentation analyses were conducted at each studied organization. Data analysis used open coding and thematic analysis. Results were triangulated based on multiple data sources. Findings: The findings revealed that the learning environment of an organization is important for workplace learning. All studied organizations share a need for a conversion of tacit to explicit knowledge in order to facilitate effective informal learning in the workplace. This research concludes that engineering the learning environment through effective knowledge management should be a cohesive effort of the entire organization and demands congruent support from all levels of the organization. Originality/value: The study expands the understanding of issues related to workplace learning through knowledge accessibility in both business and academic settings. To improve workplace learning, one should not just stipulate technology interventions; other factors, such as the organization's design, work design, and the culture/vision of the organization, all play important roles in the creation of a learning organization that will induce informal learning in the workplace.

      6/10

    1. The Learning Continuum Formal and Informal Learning Experiences - Enabling Learning and Creation of New Knowledge in an Organization.

      Amitabh, A., & Sinha, S. (2012). The Learning Continuum Formal and Informal Learning Experiences - Enabling Learning and Creation of New Knowledge in an Organization. International Journal of Advanced Corporate Learning, 5(2), 10–14. https://doi.org/10.3991/ijac.v5i2.2111

      https://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&AuthType=shib&db=eue&AN=76422894&site=eds-live&scope=site&custid=uphoenix

      Over the years, there has been a significant shift in the approach towards 'learning' in an organization. The focus of learning is no more limited to only the formal training mediums, such as classroom interventions and elearning programs. The shift in learning paradigm is more towards the creation of new learning solution that provides formal and informal learning, information and collaboration - thereby enabling the formation of a 'personal learning environment.' Now, there is a shift from 'content focus' to 'learner focus' education. This paper will suggest the appropriate use of technologies and processes to create a rich learning environment that includes a broad array of instructions, information resources, and collaborative solutions. The paper will also focus on the areas or situations where the new learning environment can be applied and the ways in which an organization can leverage the full range of its learning continuum.

      8/10

    1. The Learning Continuum Formal and Informal Learning Experiences - Enabling Learning and Creation of New Knowledge in an Organization.

      Amitabh, A., & Sinha, S. (2012). The Learning Continuum Formal and Informal Learning Experiences - Enabling Learning and Creation of New Knowledge in an Organization. International Journal of Advanced Corporate Learning, 5(2), 10–14. https://doi.org/10.3991/ijac.v5i2.2111

      https://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&AuthType=shib&db=eue&AN=76422894&site=eds-live&scope=site&custid=uphoenix

      Over the years, there has been a significant shift in the approach towards 'learning' in an organization. The focus of learning is no more limited to only the formal training mediums, such as classroom interventions and elearning programs. The shift in learning paradigm is more towards the creation of new learning solution that provides formal and informal learning, information and collaboration - thereby enabling the formation of a 'personal learning environment.' Now, there is a shift from 'content focus' to 'learner focus' education. This paper will suggest the appropriate use of technologies and processes to create a rich learning environment that includes a broad array of instructions, information resources, and collaborative solutions. The paper will also focus on the areas or situations where the new learning environment can be applied and the ways in which an organization can leverage the full range of its learning continuum.

      7/10

    1. the name of something and when you press the button to go to the link if it wasn't there it made the card

      This is a phenomenally important UX insight and affordance that has become a foundation of how all modern wiki-linking knowledge graph tools work today. Kudos to Ward for this!

    1. maybe once a week do a weekly review and put stuff back into the wiki, either new notes, or refinements of existing ones

      This regularly scheduled review and revision portion can be very important. Too often people throw things into their "stream" and then never revisit them. The reflection and review over them may help one gain greater perspective or allow them to re-think something to discover bits they may not have seen or realized before, particularly after intervening time has provided additional ideas and experience.

    1. In fact, if you do the math, if failure equals knowledge and knowledge equals power, then failure equals power by the transitive property.

      But first we have to prove that this system has the transitive property to begin with!

    Tags

    Annotators

    1. Rationality and transparency are the values of classical liberalism. Rationality and transparency are supposed to be what make free markets and democratic elections work. People understand how the system functions, and that allows them to make rational choices.

      But economically, we know there isn't perfect knowledge or perfect rationality (see Tversky and Khaneman). There is rarely every perfect transparency either which makes things much harder, especially in a post-truth society apparenlty.

    1. Is it possible to avoid the public goods problem altogether?

      As Lynne Kelly indicates, knowledge is a broad public good, so it is kept by higher priests and only transferred in private ceremonies to the initiated in indigenous cultures. In many senses, we've brought the value of specific information down dramatically, but there's also so much of it now, even with writing and better dissemination, it's become more valuable again.

      I should revisit the economics of these ideas and create a model/graph of this idea over history with knowledge, value, and time on various axes.

    1. To manage your knowledge, you have to know how you work.
    2. people need a simple answer to a complex problem.

      A simple and flexible Zettelkasten structure to accomplish diverse and complex needs.

    3. How do you store that amount of knowledge in a way that you can access it everytime?
    4. the more we read, the more it seems to slip through our long term memory.

      The common need to secure intuitions, thoughts and data somewhere, somehow.

    5. A Zettelkasten is a multitude of different approaches to a common problem — the problem of knowledge management.
  5. Sep 2020
    1. Many organizations assert copyright for any media which they touch, without any consideration of whether the media is eligible for copyright or whether they own the copyright.

      Shouldn't cases like these be taken to trial? Imagine someone forbidding access to a public square under allegation that it belongs to them. Afraid of being prosecuted, people start paying this person to enter the public square. One day someone decides to take the case to court. The court can't simply rule that the person can't continue asking for money to use the square. The person should be punished for having deterred people from freely using the square for so long.

    1. At that moment, Athena came down from heaven.

      Despite some depictions of the Iliad in a realistic manner, and most ancient histories after Herodotus being mostly focused on the facts and separate from religion, the Iliad (and its two sequels) are different in that the Gods take direct intervention in the plot of the story.

    2. Agamemnon, son of Atreus, that king of men

      Epithets are utilized to describe Agamemnon, such that the audience not only gets a picture of his father, but of his role, and of his importance as well. This description fits into the character category, as the epithet through a short and descriptive phrase, indicates key parts of Agamemnon's character at the beginning.

    1. Leuker, C., Hertwig, R., Gumenik, K., Eggeling, L. M., Hechtlinger, S., Kozyreva, A., Samaan, L., & Fleischhut, N. (2020). Wie informiert sich die Bevölkerung in Deutschland rund um das Coronavirus? Umfrage zu vorherrschenden Themen und Gründen, dem Umgang mit Fehlinformationen, sowie der Risikowahrnehmung und dem Wissen der Bevölkerung rund um das Coronavirus (Version 5, p. 966670) [Application/pdf]. Max-Planck-Institut für Bildungsforschung. https://doi.org/10.17617/2.3247925

  6. Aug 2020
  7. Jul 2020
    1. O’Connor, D. B., Aggleton, J. P., Chakrabarti, B., Cooper, C. L., Creswell, C., Dunsmuir, S., Fiske, S. T., Gathercole, S., Gough, B., Ireland, J. L., Jones, M. V., Jowett, A., Kagan, C., Karanika‐Murray, M., Kaye, L. K., Kumari, V., Lewandowsky, S., Lightman, S., Malpass, D., … Armitage, C. J. (n.d.). Research priorities for the COVID-19 pandemic and beyond: A call to action for psychological science. British Journal of Psychology, n/a(n/a), e12468. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjop.12468

  8. Jun 2020
    1. There are four types among those who sit before the sages: a sponge, a funnel, a strainer and a sieve.A sponge, soaks up everything; A funnel, takes in at one end and lets out at the other; A strainer, which lets out the wine and retains the lees; A sieve, which lets out the coarse meal and retains the choice flour.
    2. There are four types of disciples: Quick to comprehend, and quick to forget: his gain disappears in his loss; Slow to comprehend, and slow to forget: his loss disappears in his gain; Quick to comprehend, and slow to forget: he is a wise man; Slow to comprehend, and quick to forget, this is an evil portion.
    3. There are four kinds of temperments:Easy to become angry, and easy to be appeased: his gain disappears in his loss; Hard to become angry, and hard to be appeased: his loss disappears in his gain; Hard to become angry and easy to be appeased: a pious person; Easy to become angry and hard to be appeased: a wicked person.
    4. He used to say: At five years of age the study of Scripture; At ten the study of Mishnah; At thirteen subject to the commandments; At fifteen the study of Talmud; At eighteen the bridal canopy; At twenty for pursuit [of livelihood]; At thirty the peak of strength; At forty wisdom; At fifty able to give counsel; At sixty old age; At seventy fullness of years; At eighty the age of “strength”; At ninety a bent body; At one hundred, as good as dead and gone completely out of the world.

      growth in knowledge

    1. In philosophy, empiricism is a theory that states that knowledge comes only or primarily from sensory experience.[1] It is one of several views of epistemology, along with rationalism and skepticism.