25 Matching Annotations
  1. May 2021
    1. The foremost consideration with respect to teaching of the Australian Aboriginal memory technique is the cultural safety aspect and respect for the peoples who developed this approach. In our program, the teaching of this program was administered by an experienced Australian Aboriginal Educator, who was able to integrate the method into our teaching program, while simultaneously preventing several breaches of cultural etiquette and terminology which could easily have compromised the material had it been delivered by a non-Australian Aboriginal educator (TY), however well-intentioned. The need for a deep knowledge and understanding of the appropriate context for teaching and delivery of this material is probably the main factor which would preclude more widespread adoption of this technique.

      I really appreciate the respect given to indigenous knowledge here.

      The researchers could have gone much further in depth in describing it and the aspects of what they mean by cultural "safety". They've done a disservice here by downplaying widespread adoption. Why not? Why couldn't we accord the proper respect of traditions to actively help make these techniques more widespread? Shouldn't we be willing to do the actual work to accord respect and passing on of these knowledges?

      Given my reading in the area, there seems to be an inordinate amount of (Western) "mysticism" attributed to these techniques (here and in the broader anthropology literature) rather than approaching them head-on from a more indigenous perspective. Naturally the difficult part is being trusted enough by tribal elders to be taught these methods to be able to pass them on. (Link this idea to Tim Ingold's first chapter of Anthropology: Why It Matters.)

      All this being said, the general methods known from the West, could still be modified to facilitate in widespread adoption of those techniques we do know. Further work and refinement of them could continue apace while still maintaining the proper respect of other cultures and methods, which should be the modern culture default.

      If nothing else, the West could at least roll back the educational reforms which erased their own heritage to regain those pieces. The West showing a bit of respect for itself certainly wouldn't be out of line either.

    2. several differences were apparent between the two methods of loci.

      again, disappointing erasure here...

    3. Both methods of loci improved upon the already high level of recall among medical students relative to those who received no memory training.

      I'm saddened to see the erasure of the Australian Aboriginal approach (possibly better termed Songlines or Dreaming for specificity) here only to have it lumped into the Western method. This is worse when their general results show the Australian approach to be significantly better.

      This may be due to over-familiarity with the techniques which are broadly similar, but for rigor and respect they should remain separate in this paper.

    1. But, and this is a big but, replacing Welsh place names with English ones, just because some people can't pronounce them or they just don't like the sound of them, is not ok.It's deleting your cultural distinctiveness. Your heritage and the uniqueness of these British islands. It's getting rid of one of the oldest languages in Europe, one place name at a time.
    1. Article about the renaming of Welsh place names into English which erases culture and history.

    2. Australia's giant monolith Ayers Rock was renamed Uluru in 1993, switching from its colonial namesake, former South Australian Premier Sir Henry Ayers, to the language of its traditional owners, the Anangu people.In 2002, that dual name was officially reversed, making it Uluru/Ayers Rock. Almost all Australians now refer to it as Uluru.
    3. The highest mountain in the world, Mount Everest, is not commonly known by its Tibetan name Chomolungma, meaning goddess mother of the world.Many Sherpas, a community indigenous to the Himalayan region, believe that the summit of Chomolungma is home to the Buddhist goddess Miyolangsangma.Its English name comes from Colonel Sir George Everest, who was born in Crickhowell, Powys, in 1790, who was a Surveyor General of India.
  2. Apr 2021
    1. “The whole point is that we want to take up space,” Ms. Obell said. “Take the time to say black, Latinx and Asian. Say our names. Take the time to learn. Show me that you know the difference.”

      It almost looks like BIPOC was invented to give all of these people space, but in making it an acronym, we've given them all the least amount of space possible.

      It's definitely worth considering something else.

    2. “It is lazy to lump us all together as if we all face the same problems,” said Sylvia Obell, a host of the Netflix podcast “Okay, Now Listen.” “When you blend us all together like this, it’s erasure. It allows people to get away with not knowing people of color and our separate set of issues that we all face. It allows people to play it safe and not leave anyone out, and it also allows you to not have to do the work.”
  3. Nov 2020
    1. Yellow Diamond begin with the eleventh century of the Christian era

      Forced periodization--obviously the narrator will depend on this convention for time his readers will understand, but it shows a systematic take over of the Moonstone's history.

  4. Sep 2020
  5. Jul 2018
  6. Feb 2017
    1. how any work that needed to be done day after day was meaningless, and that only creating new things was a worthwhile endeavor

      This is interesting.... not everything is meaningful? i never thought of this in that way. to me, the "meaningless" work is the work that matters more than the creating. because one couldn't happen without the other.

    1. There has been a blank around the lives of older women, who report feeling invisible as they age — which is, as it turns out, less feeling than fact.

      Erasure of elderly women

    2. To engage with the lives of others, white audiences would have to encounter something far more frightening: their irrelevance. They would have to reckon with the fact that the work will not always speak to them, orient them, flatter them with tales of their munificence or infamy, or comfort them with stereotypes.

      In order to stop the erasure of the other, white people would have to take themselves out of the spotlight and realize not everything is for them. they would also have to encounter black suffering or something similar amongst themselves.

    3. (Of the seven black actresses to ever win an Academy Award, two played slaves, and one played a maid.)

      teaching what is wanted to be shown and not equal depictions of people. Erasure of equal identity in media film and society.

    4. #OscarsSoWhite,

      SOcial media protest agianst the erasure of minorities

    5. Only last year, the Texas Board of Education issued new textbooks for some five million public-school students that omitted mentions of Jim Crow and the Ku Klux Klan and made slavery a side issue in the Civil War.

      The erasure of black history in education. taking it out of text books.

    6. women — who are still left out of history.

      Women are not put in history. not then and still not today.

    7. ‘‘I’m erasing myself from the narrative/Let future historians wonder/How Eliza reacted when you broke her heart.’’ It’s an acknowledgment of the stories this play cannot fully restore, and of a group — women — who are still left out of history.

      The erasure of some marginalized group.... In this case women. changing the story and changing the erasure

    8. #StopErasingBlackPeople and released a statement saying the exhibition ‘‘paints H.I.V. as an issue faced predominantly by white gay men, when in fact the most at-risk group are currently black trans women.’’

      erasure of the involvement of black women in social issues and protest. Black women protest using hashtags

    9. #SayHerName movement draws attention to black women believed to be victims of police brutality, like Alexia Christian and Meagan Hockaday, whose deaths received a small fraction of the attention given to Eric Garner or Michael Brown.

      Black women using technology to advocate for their erasure.

    10. black female journalists and activists have been spotlighting how crimes against black women are met by silence and seeming unconcern

      The Erasure of black women in government, but specifically in crime.

  7. Jan 2017
    1. invisible.

      ignoring a group. not seeing whats in front of you.

    2. destroying every trace of them from the city,

      literally erasing everything that belongs to an individual person or group of people. making it seem as if they never existed.