221 Matching Annotations
  1. May 2024
    1. Seit dem Pariser Abkommen haben europäische Banken fossile Energieunternehmen durch die Ausgabe vom Anleihen in Wert von ca. einer Billion (1000 Milliarden) Euro unterstützt, wie eine Recherche des Guardian ergibt. Anleihen (Bonds) sind inzwischen die wichtigste Form der Finanzierung der Fossilindustrie. https://www.theguardian.com/business/2023/sep/26/europes-banks-helped-fossil-fuel-firms-raise-more-than-1tn-from-global-bond-markets

  2. Apr 2024
    1. “I don’t want comfort. I want God, I want poetry, I want real danger, I want freedom, and I want goodness. I want sin.”

      Exactly.

      Too many people would want conflict. The source of the conflict is not scarcity: it's human nature.

    2. “It generally becomes easier to be generous if you’re doing well and you have a big windfall, [because] when there isn’t enough for everybody, it’s just a question of who is going to starve, and then everything becomes much tougher,” Bostrom told Big Think.

      Tell that to the super-rich.

    3. erif concluded that scarcity was one of the main drivers of all human conflict. War, violence, invasion, and theft were all born of wanting a limited resource. The history of all humanity seems to support the hypothesis: We fight over water, cattle, arable land, ore deposits, oil, precious stones, and so on.

      He concluded incorrectly.

      Rich people already have more resources than they could ever use. The richest amongst us could not ever spend all the money they possess. But that does not seem to have stopped them from continuing to want more, and more, and more.

    1. The neglect of the book is however not altogether advanta- 78geous.

      There is a range of reading lengths and levels of argumentation which can be found in these various ranges.

      Some will complain about the death of books or the rise of articles or the rise of social media and the attention economy. Where is balance to be found.

      Kaiser speaks to these issues in ¶75-79. One must wonder what Kaiser would have thought about the bite-sized nature of social media and it's distracting nature?

  3. Mar 2024
    1. Simplifi's account connection is just faster. Simplifi provides real time updates every time you refresh, while Monarch's update rhythm is much slower and it's often unclear why some accounts are more updated than others.
    2. Nested categories. If I click into a spending group on Simplifi, I can see the breakdown of all categories within that group. Somehow I cannot do this on Monarch. I can only view by group or category as a whole. There's no nesting.
    1. Monarch Money recognizes that every couple has unique financial management styles. It offers users the flexibility to select which accounts and transactions should be included in the shared household overview, accommodating different preferences and needs.
    2. Yes, Monarch Money allows couples to view accounts and transactions of each other. It allows the invitation of additional household members to join. Each member receives their own login while gaining visibility into the collective household finances.
    3. While this simplicity is appealing to users who prefer an uncomplicated budgeting experience, it lacks the depth of customization provided by Monarch Money. Simplifi’s straightforward design is excellent for quick budget planning but may not satisfy those who need more nuanced financial management tools and a customized spending plan.
  4. Feb 2024
    1. For example, an HS event closely followed by heavy rainfall caused the deaths of more than 500,000 livestock and over $1.2 billion in economic losses

      for - epiphany - money is the only lens that business sees reality through

      epiphany - money is the only lens that business sees reality through - Just hit me how economics is the dominant and only metric that seems to matter to much of the business community - even in most research papers, we have to keep translating environmental into economic, as if the only people that matter are business people - it is indicative that we DO NOT KNOW HOW TO INTRINSICALLY VALUE NATURE

  5. Jan 2024
  6. Dec 2023
      • for: James Hansen - 2023 paper, key insight - James Hansen, leverage point - emergence of new 3rd political party, leverage point - youth in politics, climate change - politics, climate crisis - politics

      • Key insight: James Hansen

        • The key insight James Hansen conveys is that
          • the key to rapid system change is
            • WHAT? the rapid emergence of a new, third political party that does not take money from special interest lobbys.
            • WHY? Hit the Achilles heel of the Fossil Fuel industry
            • HOW? widespread citizen / youth campaign to elect new youth leaders across the US and around the globe
            • WHEN? Timing is critical. In the US,
              • Don't spoil the vote for the two party system in 2024 elections. Better to have a democracy than a dictatorship.
              • Realistically, likely have to wait to be a contender in the 2028 election.
      • reference

    1. Washington is a swamp it we throw out one party the other one comes in they take money from special interests and we don't have a government that's serving the interests 01:25:09 of the public that's what I think we have to fix and I don't see how we do that unless we have a party that takes no money from special interests
      • for: key insight- polycrisis - climate crisis - political crisis, climate crisis - requires a new political party, money in politics, climate crisis - fossil fuel lobbyists, climate change - politics, climate crisis - politics, James Hansen - key insight - political action - 3rd party

      • key insight

        • Both democrats and conservatives are captured by fossil fuel lobbyist interests
        • A new third political party that does not take money from special interests is required
        • The nature of the polycrisis is that crisis are entangled . This is a case in point. The climate crisis cannot be solved unless the political crisis of money influencing politics is resolved
        • The system needs to be rapidly reformed to kick money of special interest groups out of politics.
      • question

        • Given the short timescale, the earliest we can achieve this is 2028 in the US Election cycle
        • Meanwhile what can we do in between?
        • How much impact can alternative forms of local governance like https://sonec.org/ have?
        • In particular, could citizens form local alternative forms of governance and implement incentives to drive sustainable behavior?
    1. This article explores the intricacies of Deliveroo's business and revenue model, shedding light on the mechanics behind this popular food delivery platform's success. Discover how Deliveroo operates and, most importantly, how it generates revenue in the competitive world of food delivery services.

    1. Will artificial intelligence create useless class of people? - Yuval Noah Harari

      1:00 "bring the latest findings of science of the public", otherwise the public space "gets filled with conspiracy theories and fake news and whatever".<br /> he fails to mention that ALL his beautiful "scientists" are financially dependent on corporations, who dictate the expected results, and who sabotage "unwanted research".<br /> for example, the pharma industry will NEVER pay money for research of natural cancer cures, or "alternative" covid cures like ivermectin / zinc / vitamin C, because these cures have no patent, so there is no profit motive, and also because the "militant pacifists" want to fix overpopulation this way.<br /> a "scientist" should be someone, who has all freedom to propose hypotheses, which then are tested in experiments (peer review), and compared to real placebo control groups. because that is science, or "the scientific method". everything else is lobbying for "shekel shekel".

    1. we as a society do…. Stuff to get money
      • for: money - enabling transaction with strangers, adjacency - money - othering

      • adjacency between

        • money
        • othering
        • competition
        • sacred
      • adjacency statement
        • in exchange for MY labour, I have access to the fruits of others
        • how much money your can get used how much resource produced by others you can get
        • we accumulate money for ourselves and don't share much with others
        • othering is built into the use of money ,- the artificial scarcity of money puts us all in competition with each other for a scarce resource
        • competition is othering
        • by default, the economic game is about grabbing the most resources for self
        • hence it is facing a direction AWAY from the sacred
        • it intrinsically does not treat all others a equally sacred
        • it promotes an every-person-for themselves attitude
    1. the modern economic system the modern Financial system is based on the same 00:11:02 principle the most successful fiction ever created is not any God it's money
      • for: example - fiction - money

      • comment

        • money is also a fiction, possibly the most powerful one humans have ever created.
  7. Nov 2023
  8. Oct 2023
  9. Aug 2023
    1. why does it in a sense if we think of money as a voting tool why is it that a billionaire has a 00:32:31 billion times more power to decide what society should be like than i do
      • for: voting, power - money, money - voting, inequality, voting - money, equity, voting power - rich
      • paraphrase
      • question
        • if we think of money as a voting tool
          • why does a billionaire have a billion times more power to decide what society should be like than i do?
  10. Apr 2023
    1. Link to: https://hypothes.is/a/lV19ytGBEe2ynWMu34UKUg

      This depreciation is done at the lowest level of exchange and caused the system to collapse rather quickly. What level is our current exchange done at such that the inequalities are pushed up multiple levels making the system seem more stable? How is instability introduced? How could it be minimized?

      Our current system is valued both by time and skill (using the measure of payment per hour).

      Compare this with salespeople who are paid on commission rather than on an hourly basis. They are then using their skill of sales ability and balancing time (and levels of chance) to create their outcomes, but at the same time, some of their work is built on the platform that sales management or the company provides. Who builds this and how do they get paid for it? Who provides sales leads? How is this calculated into the system costs?

      How do these ideas fit into the Bullshit Jobs thesis?

    2. Tradesmen, too, were quick to see that the exchange might be worked to their advantage; they brought unsaleable stock from their shops, exchanged it for labour notes, and then picked out the best of the saleable articles. Consequently the labour notes began to depreciate; trouble also arose with the proprietors of the premises, and the experiment came to an untimely end early in 1834.

      The labour exchange at Gray's Inn Road which began on September 3, 1832, which was based on Robert Owen's idea in The Crisis (June 1832), eventually collapsed in 1834 as the result of Greshham's Law in which "bad money drives out good." In this case, rather than money the object was the relative value of goods which were exchanged based on Labour notes. Labour notes were used to exchange unsaleable stock in shops for labour notes which were then used to purchase more valuable goods. This caused depreciation of the labor notes ultimately causing the experiment to collapse in 1834.

  11. Mar 2023
    1. the value-system of money is supplanting traditional religions, as part of a profound secular conversion we only dimly understand

      //In Other Words - Money is the new secular reiigion

    1. If you were like me in childhood, and shared the habit of practically memorizing the contents of each year’s Guiness Book of World Records, you will probably recall that the prize for the world’s “largest money” has long been in the hands of the Yap Islanders of Micronesia. These are the iconic round stones with a hollow center, known in Yapese as rai, which have been quarried and sculpted by the islanders for at least the past several centuries, and perhaps for millennia. I’ve known about these rai stones forever, but what I only learned recently is that on at least one occasion a stone was being transported in an outrigger canoe from one island to another, when the vessel hit a sudden storm and the giant coin was lost to the ocean’s secret bottom. By some sharp and impromptu casuistry, the boatsmen found a practical solution to this sudden shortfall in specie, which seems to have satisfied both those who lost it, and those to whom they had intended to pay it. The men reasoned that while there is no conceivable way to retrieve the stone from the ocean, or even to see it again, one may nonetheless be certain that it is still down there, and that it retains whatever value it had before it sank. Therefore, it can continue to be traded indefinitely between willing parties, just like any other rai stone. It doesn’t really matter if the stone is still in our direct possession or not.

      jistin e.h.smith substack has gone behind a paywall but if you smile nicely and say please, hel'll give you a free sub.

    1. In economics, Gresham's law is a monetary principle stating that "bad money drives out good". For example, if there are two forms of commodity money in circulation, which are accepted by law as having similar face value, the more valuable commodity will gradually disappear from circulation.[1][2] The law was named in 1860 by economist Henry Dunning Macleod after Sir Thomas Gresham (1519–1579), an English financier during the Tudor dynasty. Gresham had urged Queen Elizabeth to restore confidence in then-debased English currency. The concept was thoroughly defined in medieval Europe by Nicolaus Copernicus and known centuries earlier in classical Antiquity, the Middle East and China.

      Gresham's law is an economic monetary principle which states that "bad money drives out good."

      It relates to commodity value, particularly in coinage, where cheaper base metals in coins will cause more expensive coinage to disappear from circulation.

  12. Jan 2023
    1. I think for some people that’s actually fine. Watching money compound gives them more pleasure than they would get spending it.
    2. I think what many people really want from money is the ability to stop thinking about money. To have enough money that they can stop thinking about it and focus on other stuff.
    3. To someone who grew up in an old-money affluent family, a Lamborghini might be a symbol of gaudy egotism; to those who grew up with nothing, the car might serve as the ultimate symbol that you’ve made it.
    4. How you spend money can reveal an existential struggle of what you find valuable in life, who you want to spend time with, why you chose your career, and the kind of attention you want from other people.
    1. High Country News, Rebecca Nagle reported that for every dollar the U.S. government spent on eradicating Native languages in past centuries, it has spent less than 7 cents on revitalizing them in the 21st century. 

      !- United States indigenous language : ststistic - US Govt spent less than 7 cents for every dolloar spent eradicating indigenous language in the past - Citation : report by Rebecca Nagle in the High Country News: https://www.hcn.org/issues/51.21-22/indigenous-affairs-the-u-s-has-spent-more-money-erasing-native-languages-than-saving-them

    1. it's what i write about and that is why what  is it that has created this uh uh disparity   and why is it widened so much since 1980. well  the most obvious reason is uh interest rates   reached a peak of 20 in uh 1980 and they've gone  down ever since well in the late 1970s uh my old   00:16:50 boss's boss at chase manhattan paul volcker  said let's raise interest rates to very high   because the 99 are getting too much income their  wages are going up let's uh raise interest to slow   the economy and that will prevent wages from going  up and he did and that was a large uh reason why   carter lost the the election to ronald reagan  interest rates then went down from 20 to almost 0   00:17:20 today the result was the largest bond market boom  in history bonds went way up in price the economy   was flooded with bank credit and most of this  credit uh apart from going into the bond market   went into real estate and there is a uh symbiosis  between finance and real estate and also between   finance and raw materials and also like oil and  gas and minerals uh extraction natural resource   00:17:48 rent land rent and also monopoly rent and most of  the monopoly rent has come from the privatization   that you had from ronald reagan margaret thatcher  and the whole neoliberalism uh if you look at how   did this one percent get most of its wealth well  if you look at the forbes list of the billionaires   in almost every country they got wealth in  the old-fashioned way from taking it from   00:18:13 the public domain in other words privatization  you have the largest privatization and transfer   of wealth from the public sector to uh the private  sector and specifically to the financial sector uh   in in history uh sell-offs and all of a sudden  instead of uh infrastructure uh public health uh   other uh basic needs being provided at subsidized  rates to the population you have uh privatized   00:18:41 owners uh financed by the banks raising the rates  to whatever rate they can get without any market   firing power uh in the united states the  government is not even allowed to bargain with   the pharmaceutical companies for the drug prices  so there's been a huge monopolization a huge   privatization a huge flooding of the economy with  credit and one person's credit is somebody else's   00:19:11 uh debt so you you've described the one percent's  wealth in the form of uh savings but uh i focus   on the other side of the balance sheet this one  percent finds its counterpart in the debts of the   99 so the one percent has got wealthy by indebting  the 99 uh for housing that is soared in price 20   00:19:37 uh just in the last year in the united states uh  for medical care for uh utilities for education   uh the economy is being forced increasingly  into debt and how how can one uh solve this   taxation will not be enough the only way  that you can uh actually reverse this uh   concentration of wealth is to begin wiping out uh  the debt if you leave the debt in place of the 99   00:20:10 uh then uh you're going to leave the one percent  savings all in place uh and these savings are   largely tax exempt uh so basically i think you  you uh left out the government's role in this   wealth creation of the one percent so your  finance has indeed grown faster than economy   absorbed real estate into the finance insurance  and real estate sector the fire sector finances   00:20:39 absorb the oil industry the mining industry  and it's absorbed most of the government so the   financial wealth has spilled over to become  essentially the economy's central planner   it's not planned in washington or paris or london  it's planned in wall street the city of london   and the paris ports the economy is being managed  financially and the object of financial management   00:21:04 isn't really to make money it's capital gains  and again as your statistics point out capital   gains are really what explains the increase  in wealth you don't get rich by saving the   income rent is for paying interest income is for  paying interest you get rich off the government   basically subsidizing an enormous increase in the  value of stocks the value of bonds by the central   00:21:31 banks which have been privatized and uh the reason  that this is occurring is that uh the largest   public utility of all money creation and banking  is left in private hands and private banking   in the west is very different from what government  banking is in say china

      !- Michael Hudson : Wealth is created in the 1% through privatization and loss of the 99% - Largest transfer of wealth in history from the public sector to the private sector, especially through financial sector - govt fire sale of public infrastructure - credit was created and invested in the biggest bon market boom in history - many of Forbes billionaires got rich through such privatization - the 1% got wealthy by indebting the 99% through privatization all around the globe - this was the effect of Ronald Reagan and Margaret Thatcher's neoliberal policies - taxation alone is not sufficient to reverse this wealth concentration, the debt has to be completely wiped out

      !- key statement : the elite get rich off the government subsidizing an enormous increase in the value of stocks the value of bonds by the central bank which have been privatized. The reason THAT is happening is because the largest public utility of all, money creation and central banking has been privatized.

  13. Dec 2022
    1. According to an analysis from the Wall Street Journal, the top 1% of Twitch streamers made over 50% of all money paid out by the platform in 2021. Furthermore, just 5% of users had made over $1,000 in the same year. Only 0.06% had made over the U.S. median household income of $67,521. In a survey of 5,000 community members composed of smaller Twitch streamers, Stream Scheme found that 76% were not able to reach Twitch’s $100 minimum payout threshold. Most others were making between $25-130 per month on the platform. 
    2. In a 2021 leak of Twitch’s user data that included creator payouts, it was revealed that from August 2019 to October 2021, the top 100 streamers on the platform made anywhere between $9,626,712.16 and $886,999.17. 
  14. Nov 2022
    1. dealised utopia

      Possibly, besides web monetization, there can be donation basket like ko-fi beside curation, as well as cleatly linking back to the original that can have a donation basket as well. The options are complementary.

    1. A typical ridiculous, unquestioned business adage is "If you can't measure it, you can't manage it." That's BS on the face of it, because the vast majority of important things we manage at work aren't measurable, from the quality of our new hires to the confidence we instill in a fledgling manager.
  15. Oct 2022
    1. The average performance pay rise for most employees is 3% a year. That is minuscule compared to the 14.8% pay raise the average person gets when they switch jobs.
  16. Sep 2022
    1. We decided to follow their rules to stay in their affiliate program, because that's how we are able to actually run the site (without any ads).And if you look on the issue from the usability point of view, not having their price history isn't that big of a deal, unless the game is sold only on Amazon - and most games aren't - so you always have other stores to compare the price to.
    1. Then it goes to interest rates. Central banks determine the amount of money and credit that is available to be spent. They do that by setting interest rates and buying and selling debt assets with money they print e.g., quantitative easing and quantitative tightening.

      Money printing, a free and self-funding machine. Easy money to make bad investments.

    2. When central banks create low interest rates relative to inflation rates and when they make plenty of credit available, they encourage a) borrowing and spending and b) the selling of debt assets e.g., bonds by investors and the buying of inflation-hedge assets, which accelerates economic growth and raises inflation (especially when there is little ability for the quantity of goods and services to be increased). And, of course, the reverse is true i.e., when they make high interest rates relative to inflation and make the supply of money and credit tight, they have the reverse effect. 

      Again, easy money to inflate prices with low interest rates controlled instead of letting the market (people) to adjust naturally based on savings and investments.

    3.  Interest rates rising relative to inflation causes prices of equities, equity-like markets, and most income-producing assets to go down because of a) the negative effects it has on incomes, b) the need for asset prices to go down to provide competitive returns i.e., “the present value effect”, and c) the fact that there is less money and credit available to buy those investment assets.

      After every boom created with easy money, the collapse is inevitable, and the, of course, with less money and credit to spend, prices of equities, equity-like markets, and most income-producing assets start to go down.

    4. Since the price of anything is equal to the amount of money and credit spent on it divided by the quantity of it sold, the change in prices i.e., inflation is equal to the change in the amount of money and credit spent on goods and services divided by the change in the quantities of goods and services sold.

      Inflation raises as the amount of money and credit spent increases with the printing of new money and credit out of nothing, no value or productivity added.

  17. Aug 2022
  18. www.janeausten.pludhlab.org www.janeausten.pludhlab.org
    1. Had he wished ever to see her again, he need not have waited till this time; he would have done what she could not but believe that in his place she should have done long ago, when events had been early giving him the independence which alone had been wanting

      He could have come to her or written to her, now he had sufficient money for their marriage but he chose not to - later we learn he did think about it

  19. Apr 2022
  20. Mar 2022
    1. James Heathers. (2021, October 26). Perish the thought I would be as peremptory as @GidMK. No, I’m going to hector, mock, or annoy those replies, THEN ask for money, THEN block you when I get bored. See, these aren’t rebuttals. No-one’s said anything about the actual work. Nothing. Not a sausage. [Tweet]. @jamesheathers. https://twitter.com/jamesheathers/status/1452980059497762824

  21. Dec 2021
    1. Already tens of thousands of years ago, one can find evidence ofobjects – very often precious stones, shells or other items ofadornment – being moved around over enormous distances. Oftenthese were just the sort of objects that anthropologists would laterfind being used as ‘primitive currencies’ all over the world.

      Is it also possible that these items may have served the purpose of mnemonic devices as a means of transporting (otherwise invisible) information from one area or culture to another?

      Can we build evidence for this from the archaeological record?

      Relate this to the idea of expanding the traditional "land, labor, capital" theory of economics to include "information" as a basic building block

  22. Oct 2021
    1. time as the new currency

      Marilyn Waring

      Time: The New Currency

      Women tend to be excluded from the national economy because their work is not paid and therefore not value or factored into the Gross Domestic Product of a nation. Money, then, is a mechanism for disempowerment.

  23. theliturgists.com theliturgists.com
    1. THE SUNDAY THING

      The Sunday Thing

      The love of money is the root of all evil

      This week, Michael Gungor asked us to discuss money in our breakout groups.

      Money is power

      We outsource our power and authority to those who claim to have greater access to capital, because we underestimate and undervalue our own social influence, economic capacity, and political agency. The entreprecariat is designed for learned helplessness (social: individualism), trained incapacities (economic: specialization), and bureaucratic intransigence (political: authoritarianism). https://hypothes.is/a/667dOC0bEeyV6Itx3ySxmw

      Indigenous cultures in Canada were disempowered by outlawing the cultural practice of generosity (potlatch) and replacing the practice with centralized power over the medium of exchange: money. Money is a mechanism of disempowerment.

      Money is a shared story we tell ourselves about what has value. https://www.npr.org/transcripts/795246685

      We translated “ekklesia” as church. It is the deliberative body of the experiment in democracy in Athens, Greece. The people who are figuring out how to live together in the commons. The work of the people. The Liturgists.


      The Story of Money

      In this hour, On the Media looks at the story of money, from its uncertain origins to its digital reinvention in the form of cryptocurrency.

      On the Media: Full Faith & Credit


      Squid Game

      People were also discussing Squid Game.

      Squid Game was on my mind today before the call. “The reality of the history of Canada’s mining industry makes #SquidGame look like child’s play.” https://twitter.com/bauhouse/status/1449726452098682881?s=20

      The truth is that all of the gold that was mined out of the Klondike was under Indigenous land. There was no treaty with any of Indigenous peoples in the Yukon.

      Commons: Mining

  24. imaginaxiom.com imaginaxiom.com
    1. However, we know that money is a fiction, a story that we tell ourselves. Money is a story about what and who has value. This scale of human value that we call money is fake. But if enough people believe it, that idea of money becomes our reality.

      On the Media

      The Story of Money

      Full Faith & Credit

      In this hour, On the Media looks at the story of money, from its uncertain origins to its digital reinvention in the form of cryptocurrency.

    1. In this hour, On the Media looks at the story of money, from its uncertain origins to its digital reinvention in the form of cryptocurrency.

      The Story of Money

      Ten autumns ago came two watershed moments in the history of money. In September 2008, the bankruptcy of Lehman Brothers triggered a financial meltdown from which the world has yet to fully recover. The following month, someone using the name Satoshi Nakamoto introduced BitCoin, the first cryptocurrency. Before our eyes, the very architecture of money was evolving — potentially changing the world in the process. In this hour, On the Media looks at the story of money, from its uncertain origins to its digital reinvention in the form of cryptocurrency.

    1. So the story that emerges about the origins of money is very different than the way we usually think about it. In this model embraced by Bill and other anthropologists, money is partly a mechanism of social obligation and partly a mechanism to keep track of who owes what to whom. It's also a mechanism that cements the relationship between ordinary people and authorities who maintain records. In other words, it's a story about power.
    1. On Saturday, October 9, after our World Weavers conversation on the topic Matter is Derivative of Consciousness, I was exploring Value Village, a thrift store in Chilliwack, with my wife, Jayne. I came across a book that fits with the theme for our World Weavers conversation on October 23: Shifting from an attention economy to an intention economy.

      Sacred Economics

      By Charles Eisenstein

      Sacred money, then, will be a medium of giving, a means to imbue the global economy with the spirit of the gift that governed tribal and village cultures, and still does today wherever people do things for each other outside the money economy.

      Sacred Economics describes this future and also maps out a practical way to get there. Long ago I grew tired of reading books that criticized some aspect of our society without offering a positive alternative. Then I grew tired of books that offered a positive alternative that seemed impossible to reach: “We must reduce carbon emissions by 90 percent.” Then I grew tired of books that offered a plausible means of reaching it but did not describe what I personally, could do to create it. Sacred Economics operates on all four levels: it offers a fundamental analysis of what has gone wrong with money; it describes a more beautiful world based on a different kind of money and economy; it explains the collective actions necessary to create that world and the means by which these actions come about; and it explores the personal dimensions of the world-transformation, the change in identity and being that I call “living in the gift.”

      (Page XIX)

    1. Når Skavlan vil vite om Witzøe mener penger kan gjøre en lykkelig, svarer den unge finansmannen at han tror «penger løser det som penger løser».– De viktige tingene i livet, som handler om vennskap, kjærlighet, relasjoner og opplevelser sammen med andre, er vanskelig å få kjøpt for penger. Og det er jeg egentlig ganske glad for.
  25. Sep 2021
    1. In this article, we have curated a list of various monetization strategies and how to implement them to generate massive revenue through an app.
    1. em ? Puritanism, in its marriage of convenience with industrial capitalism, was the agent which converted men to new valuations of time; which taught children even in their infancy to improve each shining hour; and which saturated men's minds with the equation, time is money.128 O
    2. nt. Time is now currency: it is not passed but spe

      Time is now currency: it is not passed but spent.

      Some of this essay shows the change in conceptualization of time and its use. Identifying it as currency certainly happened over time.

      What else might we equate with time besides money? Happiness instead? Measure it in leisure instead of solely by capitalism?

  26. Aug 2021
    1. Die zehn Prozent mit den höchsten Einkommen bezahlten 78 Prozent der direkten Bundessteuern.

      How much money is that actually?

  27. Jul 2021
    1. The New Money Trust: How Large Money Managers Control Our Economy and What We Can Do About It

      WTF is wrong?

      Where is the moral character and backbone of the American people. We know something is wrong! It smells and stinks yet no one does anything. Most of our elected politicians are useless turds floating in wastewater and the rest are multiple term professional corrupt politicians waiting for the appropriate revolving door opportunity. This has nothing to do with party affiliation, it is rampant on both sides. Political parties perpetuate the illusion as a control mechanism. We see it yet do nothing about it! WHY?

      This paper (topic) is typical of the continued "head in the sand" passive financial regulatory system loaded with Sheeple and kiss-ass do nothing idiots. Alarms have been going off since 2005/6 and as predicted then, our financial system imploded in 07/08.

      1. What lesson was learned?
      2. Who were the players?
      3. What disciplinary actions took place?
      4. Who went to Jail?

      Nothing has changed. Corruption and fraud fuel a dysfunctional financial system destined to cripple the American and Global economies. Economists and many within the financial sector know what is going on. Maybe they care about the average person but are afraid to come forward. Maybe they don't care and fully intend to rape and pillage as much of the global society as possible.

      The question is what are YOU going to do to protect future generations, your children, grand children and so on?

    1. For every mile we don't drive, our air gets a little bit cleaner. There are many ways to drive less- walking, biking, taking transit, telecommuting, carpooling, and more. Driving less can also save you money and improve your emotional and physical health. Working from home has been gaining popularity and may offer other benefits such as improved productivity. 

      For every mile we don't drive, our air gets a little bit cleaner. There are many ways to drive less- walking, biking, taking transit, telecommuting, carpooling, and more. Driving less can also save you money and improve your emotional and physical health. Working from home has been gaining popularity and may offer other benefits such as improved productivity.

    1. Claudia: In what ways do you think that being in the U.S. all that time shaped who you are?Yosell: I think the only way I can put it really is just being strong. Because basically you got to learn how to mature in a faster way than you'd probably do it here. I've seen a couple of family members or friends here that are like 30 years old and they're still living with their dad and mom. They're just like not doing anything for their life, and opposed of people out there, most of them that I do know were just living by themselves and doing their thing. I'd say out there it's probably not that good because you’d get, because most of the people would get into some kind of a drug addiction or something like that. I’d say, here, here it'd be probably the same, but out there it'd be easier to make money. Here it's a lot harder. That's probably what's the difference here to there. That's what I'm saying, I think out there you learn how to be strong. When you come here, you're just like, "Oh." most people get depressed or frustrated here. Others actually know how to move on and continue. That's probably how I see it.

      Reflections, The United States; Feelings

    1. In 1780, two years after Linnaeus’s death, Vienna’s Court Library introduced a card catalog, the first of its kind. Describing all the books on the library’s shelves in one ordered system, it relied on a simple, flexible tool: paper slips. Around the same time that the library catalog appeared, says Krajewski, Europeans adopted banknotes as a universal medium of exchange. He believes this wasn’t a historical coincidence. Banknotes, like bibliographical slips of paper and the books they referred to, were material, representational, and mobile. Perhaps Linnaeus took the same mental leap from “free-floating banknotes” to “little paper slips” (or vice versa).

      I've read about the Vienna Court Library and their card catalogue. Perhaps worth reading Krajewski for more specifics to link these things together?

      Worth exploring the idea of paper money as a source of inspiration here too.

  28. Jun 2021
    1. Mike: And a lot of thing is survival too. A lot of people have to survive. A lot of people don't have the luxury of being able to get up, go to work every day. A lot of people wish that they had a job. Would kill to just get up early and just get that paycheck. I know a lot of families that they have to go through the most, but they still do it, because they have to. They have no choice. And it's way better than here. And I didn't understand that until now.

      Reflections, The United States, Worst Parts

    2. Mike: No, that was actually... She was still in high school. She was in senior year I believe. I wasn't in high school anymore, I was working at that time, working for the Solar Spot. I had barely started working for the Solar Spot and she kind of gave me motivation to do better. When you have somebody, you want to take them out and do extra stuff. So you're like, "Yeah man, I got to get this money."Mike: And that was another motivation that helped me kind of get up at a higher level than I was. But it was just a lot of stuff. When you have kids young, you think you want something, but you don't know. It's just like you think you like the person but you don't like them. You just like them for their looks or their body, and that was my mistake. And yes, she actually told me if I wanted to marry her.Mike: I didn't like her and I didn't want to do that to her. But she was just wanting to help me out so I could get my papers, but I couldn't do it to her, man. I just imagine myself like, "Damn, she's going to marry me." And then like, "What if I'm not the right one, and then she's going to have to go. She's taking that sacrifice for me. I don't feel like that's fair."

      Time in the US, Relationships, Creating Families

  29. Apr 2021
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    1. We are are continuing our commitment to creating our games that are free and widely accessible anyone that is curious by making our game files available under Creative Commons license BY–NC–SA 4.0. That means we will continue offering a full, free print-and-play kit for Pax Pamir, and later this campaign, John Company! Anyone can use, remix, and share the game, so long as they do not use it for commercial purposes. 
    1. But in ancient Mesopotamia, beginning around five thousand years ago, people used clay tokens to record transactions involving agricultural produce like barley or wool, or metals such as silver. Such tablets performed much the same function as a banknote. Often, through the centuries, traders have devised such tokens or bills without government involvement, especially at times when coins have been in short supply or debased and devalued.

      more BTC historical context.

  30. Mar 2021
    1. Sorry you’re surprised. Issues are filed at about a rate of 1 per day against GLib. Merge requests at a rate of about 1 per 2 days. Each issue or merge request takes a minimum of about 30 minutes (across at least 2 people) to analyse, put together a fix, test it, review it, fix it, review it and merge it. I’d estimate the average is closer to 3 hours than 30 minutes. Even at the fastest rate, it would take 3 working months to clear the backlog of ~1000 issues. I get a small proportion of my working time to spend on GLib (not full time).
  31. Feb 2021
    1. money and other assets aren't like the other things you can share online. If you send a selfie to a friend, you can still share it with another. But you can't give your friend a dollar you've already given to someone else. The money must leave your account to go into your friend's. It can't exist in two places at once. If the Internet treated money just like information, there would be a risk if you're spending the same money twice.

      Money vs information in internet

    1. It’s always about the money… Fish got’a swim, birds got’a fly, and development has to have money. If you think otherwise you’re a fool!
    1. Part of me thinks that open source can be more rewarding to the creators/contributors. But maybe the real contribution is the permanent addition to the tools available to humanity, and if you have the wits, you can make a decent business out of it without tainting open source.
    2. For a sufficiently successful and industry-relevant open source project, it's possible for the main developers to earn a living e.g. by selling related consulting services.
  32. Jan 2021
    1. Hundreds of thousands of people attend the conference each year, bringing with them hundreds of millions of dollars in revenue to Austin.

      Need money to continue the festival

    1. this paper identifies / lists 5 reasons to follow the money in health care. These reasons are applicable to social services or other areas of philanthropy as well.

  33. Dec 2020
    1. "Up there the winters are harder yet than here, and still longer. We have only dogs to draw our sleds, fine strong dogs, but bad-tempered and often half wild, and we feed them but once a day, in the evening, on frozen fish.... Yes, there are settlements, but almost no farming; the men live by trapping and fishing ... No, I never had any difficulty with the Indians; I always got on very well with them. I know nearly all those on the Mistassini and this river, for they used to come to our place before my father died. You see he often went trapping in winter when he was not in the shanties, and one season when he was at the head of the Riviere aux Foins, quite alone, a tree that he was cutting for firewood slipped in falling, and it was the Indians who found him by chance next day, crushed and half-frozen though the weather was mild. He was in their game preserve, and they might very well have pretended not to see him and have left him to die there; but they put him on their toboggan, brought him to their camp, and looked after him. You knew my father: a rough man who often took a glass, but just in his dealings, and with a good name for doing that sort of thing himself. So when he parted with these Indians he told them to stop and see him in the spring when they would be coming down to Pointe Bleue with their furs-François Paradis of Mistassini,' said he to them, will not forget what you have done ... François Paradis.' And when they came in spring while running the river he looked after them well and every one carried away a new ax, a fine woollen blanket and tobacco for six months. Always after that they used to pay us a visit in the spring, and father had the pick of their best skins for less than the companies' buyers had to pay. When he died they treated me in the same way be cause I was his son and bore the same name, François Paradis. With more capital I could have made a good bit of money in this trade-a good bit of money."

      In by "skins" is he referring to animal skins? Their only source of transportation was dog drawn sleds? What kind of dogs were these to endure such winters? Amazing how the natives were treated so poorly by colonizers and how nicely the natives care for them when they see them struggling even after how they have been treated

  34. Nov 2020
    1. Express - 19 $ 🏃‍♀️ Skip the Review Queue 🕒 Published in 3 days 💌 Full Customer Support 💚 Support the team

      Wow, after seeing how this site works, I don't like much like it anymore.

      Esp. this below:

      Choose your preferred publish date - 9 $ Feature your project on top for 14 days and get an additional tweet - 19 $

      I hope there is/will be soon a more open/free alternative (like the "awesome" lists that use GitHub PRs instead of an opaque/proprietary submisison form).

    1. Jeff Bezos has so much money he doesn’t know what to do with it all, so he figures he’d might as well spend it on spaceships. That’s what the Amazon.com Inc. AMZN, -1.04%   founder and chief executive told Mathias Döpfner, the CEO of Business Insider parent Axel Springer, in an interview published over the weekend.
  35. Oct 2020
    1. And if they are a technical debt - how do measure up how much you can borrow so you can afford the repayments?
    2. debt ... which is not a straight bad thing but something that could provide some "short term financing" get us to survive the project (how many of us could afford to buy a house without taking out the mortgage?).
  36. Aug 2020
  37. Jul 2020
  38. Jun 2020