547 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. customers

      'users' or 'citizens' or just 'everybody affected by the outcome of the process' would be better than 'customers' here IMHO.

  2. Jul 2021
  3. Jun 2021
    1. it is not about the product

      it is not about the product, but about the process—Christopher R. Rogers

      In humanity there is no product. We're collectively about the process.

      Similar to the idea of human "being" not human "doing".

      Sadly corporations have been exerting power over people and turning us into products or inputs in their processes and dramatically devaluing and erasing our humanity.

    1. As we are drained of our “inner repertory of dense cultural inheritance,” Foreman concluded, we risk turning into “‘pancake people’—spread wide and thin as we connect with that vast network of information accessed by the mere touch of a button.”

      I'd prefer to be a "cake person".

  4. May 2021
    1. Companies do tend to use scripts but the good ones will allow their staff to stray off the script once they are experienced enough to do so as long as it benefits the customer and the company, usually this involves fixing the problem more quickly.
    2. I find most tech support is filled with inexperienced and frustrated staff who just run off a script. They're not paid well. They are Tier One support to filter out most of the incoming calls. Tech support is designed in tiers.
    3. Tech support works with scripts. Just get to know these scripts by heart and answer all questions from the script you can in one long sentence, before they ask it. Like in "Hi I have a problem with this and that...I have restarted the router, I have checked the cables, the red light is on, the green light is off, not other lights are blinking......etc.etc.etc. That way the person at the other end of the line can just go click-click-click and you'll be 10 steps further in their script in 5 seconds.
    4. So, +1 for play ball. Level 1 is supposed to filter out all simple issues (and once upon a time, you'll have forgotten something, happens to all of us), and they are not supposed to be creative. They get a script that has been refined over and over. Learn the scripts, prepare the answers, and you'll get to Level 2 more quickly than with any other method.
    5. Very often the first people you get through to on tech support lines are reading from a script.
    6. They have to ask you the dumb questions, either because their employer demands they do, or sometimes because their computer system doesn't let them get to the next part of the script unless they play ball.
    1. Stuart, A., Harkin, L., Daly, R., Sanderson, L., Park, M. S.-A., Stevenson, C., Katz, D., Gooch, D., Levine, M., & Price, B. (2021). Ageing in the time of COVID-19: The coronavirus pandemic exacerbates the experience of loneliness in older people by undermining identity processes. PsyArXiv. https://doi.org/10.31234/osf.io/rhf32

    1. If you ever had to go through the hair-pulling process of designing emails, then you understand. If you haven’t, here’s why it’s such pain:
    2. I used to dread setting up email automation and email campaigns.
  5. Apr 2021
  6. Mar 2021
    1. An NFT is a crypto-token on a blockchain. The token is virtual — the thing you own is a cryptographic key to a particular address on the blockchain — but legally, it’s property that you can buy, own or sell like any other property.

      It's already caused society a lot of harm to treat corporations as people. Turning digital assets into property seems like a similar mistake in the making.

    1. Mitch McConnell, who was accused of laying waste to bipartisan co-operation in the Senate when he blocked a supreme court pick by Barack Obama then changed the rules to hurry through three picks for Donald Trump, has said that if Democrats do away with the filibuster, they will “turn the Senate into a sort of nuclear winter”.

      Guardian, getting the big-long-truth out of the way up front. Woohoo! Exactly the right context. Persistently malignant force in America, that we have been unreceptive & unmoving in every way my entire living life. Bad people.

    1. A complicated and messy essay underlining the fact that people can figure out how to use technology in off-label ways to better humanity rather than sitting back on the intended uses of these tools.

      I definitely want to reference this in my presentation part of my workshop for "A Twitter of Our Own" for OERxDomains21.

    2. And it’s tempting for engineers to think decentralising the Web can be achieved with technology. But really, it’s people who will make it happen. Rather than staying put in our little filter bubbles, we can burst out of them — and be radically sociable, delinquent, and make a scene.

      off label uses of technology are important

      I'm reminded of how Kicks Condor has appreciated my "people work" in the past.

    3. Can we occupy technology with love?

      An interesting re-framing of the social media problem. Similar to the IndieWeb philosophy, but a bit more pointed.

    1. Brian Stelter. ‘One Year Ago Tonight, in Front of Millions of Loyal Viewers, Fox’s @SeanHannity Accused the Media of “Scaring the Living Hell out of People” about the Coronavirus and Said “I See It, Again, as like, Let’s Bludgeon Trump with This New Hoax.”’ Tweet. @brianstelter (blog), 10 March 2021. https://twitter.com/brianstelter/status/1369460806367199232.

    1. Will it also help accomplish another goal — communicating to my students that a classroom of learners is, in my mind, a sort of family?

      I like the broader idea of a classroom itself being a community.

      I do worry that without the appropriate follow up after the fact that this sort of statement, if put on as simple boilerplate, will eventually turn into the corporate message that companies put out about the office and the company being a tight knit family. It's easy to see what a lie this is when the corporation hits hard times and it's first reaction is to fire family members without any care or compassion.

    1. I don't understand why this isn't being considered a bigger deal by maintainrs/the community. Don't most Rails developers use SCSS? It's included by default in a new Rails app. Along with sprockets 4. I am mystified how anyone is managing to debug CSS in Rails at all these days, that this issue is being ignored makes sprockets seem like abandonware to me, or makes me wonder if nobody else is using sprockets 4, or what!
    1. Yes, but honestly, and no offense intended, but I don't see the harm in these type questions, nor why some people are offended when they are asked. If I owed a website, I wouldn't mind it because it just creates more pages that can be indexed. I see it as helping the website. But, I did look and didn't see a simple answer. Again, no offense is intended. I've just never understood the complaints.
  7. Feb 2021
    1. identity theft

      Saw this while scrolling through quickly. Since I can't meta highlight another hypothesis annotation

      identity theft

      I hate this term. Banks use it to blame the victims for their failure to authenticate people properly. I wish we had another term. —via > mcr314 Aug 29, 2020 (Public) on "How to Destroy ‘Surveillance C…" (onezero.medium.com)

      This is a fantastic observation and something that isn't often noticed. Victim blaming while simultaneously passing the buck is particularly harmful. Corporations should be held to a much higher standard of care. If corporations are treated as people in the legal system, then they should be held to the same standards.

  8. Jan 2021
    1. Systemd problems might not have mattered that much, except that GNOME has a similar attitude; they only care for a small subset of the Linux desktop users, and they have historically abandoned some ways of interacting the Desktop in the interest of supporting touchscreen devices and to try to attract less technically sophisticated users. If you don't fall in the demographic of what GNOME supports, you're sadly out of luck.
    1. George was seen as sharing the hardships of the common people and his popularity soared.
    1. while Fascism died in 1945 with the collapse of the Axis powers

      I would (not) like to introduce you to Francisco Franco and Spain until the 1970s.

    2. that first began in the United States

      Oh. Hell. No.

      Aside from the British example above, the authors seem to have forgotten that "movements to abolish slavery" included movements not run by White abolitionists, such as rebellions by enslaved people. One modest example roughly contemporaneous with the creation of the Bill of Rights: the Haitian Revolution. Or if you're hung up on White people abolitionists, Bartolome de las Casas (late in life). Who the hell even thinks the US invented abolitionism? WTF?

    3. But the people do not directly exercise their sovereignty, for instance, by voting directly in popular assemblies.

      False. In New England states, they actually do. And there's this little thing called the referendum...

      (Y'know, it's not like they're wrong about representative institutions. It's that they insist on putting in stupid false shit when they didn't even need to.)

    4. The first was the sundering of civil from religious law with the advent and widespread adoption of Christianity.

      WHAT THE EVERLOVING FUUUUUCK??

      HAHAHAHAHHAHAHAHAHAHA Hang on I gotta roll on the floor for a minute HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA

      Ahem.

      MAY I INTRODUCE TO YOU CHRISTIAN MONASTICISM? THE HOLY ROMAN EMPIRE? EMPEROR CONSTANTINE? THE POPE? ALL THE POPES? INCLUDING THE TIME THERE WERE TWO POPES?

      The sundering of--

      Children. Sit down and let the adults do history.

      Needless to say:

    5. to write the document which we have today.

      Incorrect. They came up with what we have today minus twenty-seven important bits of it that comprise most of what the United States has spent the last 240 or whatever years fighting over. The Bill of Rights--the "but mah freedoms" part of the Constitution--didn't come along for four more years.

    6. The second momentous change was the emergence of multiple denominations within Christianity that undid Christian unity and in turn greatly undermined political unity.

      OK wait. So...civil law was sundered from religious law because of Christianity in the last sentence, but in this sentence, schisms in Christianity (which, remember, had sundered political and religious law) undermined political unity?

      (I mean, there were a lot of wars because of the various reformations and counter-reformations, but

      • there was no prior Christian unity, as I'm sure the Orthodox would like to remind us, to say nothing of the heretics the Inquisition enjoyed killing all over western Europe
      • political unity? Really? Like Europeans weren't over there killing each other even if they were all at least nominally Catholic?

      Look, it's like somebody thinks the multi-national, polyglot monastery in The Name of the Rose was representative of pre-Reformation Europe and forgot that The Name of the Rose is a murder mystery.

      (They didn't think that. These people wouldn't make it ten pages in anything by Eco. Bear with my nerd analogies.)

    7. its people have shared a history of common struggle and achievement, from carving communities out of a vast, untamed wilderness, to winning independence and forming a new government, through wars, industrialization

      We gotta do this clause by clause:

      • "its people have shared a history of common struggle and achievement" - no. Aside from the long history of dispute about who born in the United States really "counts" as an "American", there has never been a common struggle.
      • "carving communities out of a vast, untamed wilderness" - no. As of this writing I have finished reading the first half of the document and there has, as yet, been no mention of Indigenous peoples. (Also, see the vast literature on the relationship between expansionism, the "frontier", and American exceptionalism.)
      • "winning independence and forming a new government" - dramatic oversimplification. Interesting fact about this document: in contains almost no references to state government.
      • "wars, industrialization, waves of immigration, technological progress, and political change" - not highlighting this because it's wrong, but because it implies a strictly linear progress of history that is typical of American exceptionalism and intellectual arguments for racism, colonialism, etc.

      All in all, what Luke said.

  9. Dec 2020
    1. Making UIs with Svelte is a pleasure. Svelte’s aesthetics feel like a warm cozy blanket on the stormy web. This impacts everything — features, documentation, syntax, semantics, performance, framework internals, npm install size, the welcoming and helpful community attitude, and its collegial open development and RFCs — it all oozes good taste. Its API is tight, powerful, and good looking — I’d point to actions and stores to support this praise, but really, the whole is what feels so good. The aesthetics of underlying technologies have a way of leaking into the end user experience.
    1. an expert in fragment-based and covalent drug discovery.

      FBDD expert

    2. Chief Scientific Officer of Arvinas

      a senior industry leader

    3. data science expert

      data science expert

    4. global Head for Data Science at Johnson & Johnson Medical Devices Technology

      a senior industry leader

    5. Vice President of Oncology Research at AstraZeneca

      Kevin is a senior industry leader

  10. Nov 2020
    1. Man, for some reason, I really like this answer. I recognize it's a bit more complicated, but it seems so useful. And given that I'm no bash expert, it leads me to believe that my logic is faulty, and there's something wrong with this methodology, otherwise, I feel others would have given it more praise. So, what's the problem with this function? Is there anything I should be looking out for here?

      I think the main thing wrong with it is the eval (which I think can be changed to $("$@") and it's pretty verbose.

      Also, there are more concise ways to do it that would probably appeal more to most bash experts...

      like set -x

      and it does unnecessary things: why save output to a variable? Just let output go to where it would normally go...

      So yeah, I can see why this solution isn't very popular. And I'm rather surprised by all the praise comments it's gotten.

    1. The nice thing about leading with an RFC process is that it shows potential contributors, from the get-go, that they have a path to contributing even big ideas.
  11. Oct 2020
    1. Counterintuitively, people love reading about and engaging in what they consider "stupidity".Internet companies capitalize on this by bringing an optimized stream of stupidity for your viewing pleasure. Take a look at the front page of Reddit (logged out, default subs): Half of the content highlights stupidity of others: /r/IdiotsInCars shows the worst drivers from around the world, /r/insanepeoplefacebook shows the most bizarre clips from social media, /r/choosingbeggars highlights the dumbest negotiation attempts, /r/trashy and /r/iamatotalpieceofshit are selected stories of bad behavior, /r/whatcouldgowrong and /r/instantkarma are videos of people making bad decisions and suffering the consequences, /r/publicfreakout is videos of people fighting. Contributors hunt for the most egregious examples to post to Reddit in the hopes of getting upvotes.Twitter isn't much better: Topics spread on Twitter when they promote outrage or allow the reader to feel smugly superior to someone.If you spend your days online consuming this content day in and day out, you're going to become convinced that the world is "stupid" and getting stupider. In reality, you're simply tapping into stupidity concentrators, getting bite-sized views of stupidity so you can react in astonishment and feel superior to stupid people doing stupid things.I think COVID quarantine has worsened this, as people are getting even more of their worldview through social media feeds instead of actually interacting with people in the real world. If 90% of your insight into social interactions comes from clickbait social media sites selecting the most egregious stories and videos from around the world, of course you're going to think "stupidity is expanding". In reality, it's a sign that you need to revaluate your sources of information and move to platforms and networks where people are talking about something other than other people's stupidity.

      Worth point to consider when you think that there are more and more stupid people. tldr; you might spend too much time on the internet

    1. Espen Slettnes 3rd degree connection3rd Espen has a account BMC-Upper Monthly contest designer and local coordinator at Berkeley Math Circle
    1. Claire Du 2nd degree connection2nd Claire has a account Stanford '24 | AI4Youth Canada
    1. Riri Jiang 3rd degree connection3rd Riri has a account Student at Princeton University

      Bumped into this profile while looking for something. Impressive list of achievements at a young age. Model to emulate

  12. Sep 2020
    1. some people would sooner jeopardize their health and everyone else’s than accept new information or admit to being wrong.

      Although some people are taking this situation as a hoax, but many aren't and are trying to stay safe for themselves and their families. When they get sick themselves they see it is an actual issue and as the article says, jeopardizes their own health. We told you so!

    1. Svelte will not offer a generic way to support style customizing via contextual class overrides (as we'd do it in plain HTML). Instead we'll invent something new that is entirely different. If a child component is provided and does not anticipate some contextual usage scenario (style wise) you'd need to copy it or hack around that via :global hacks.
    1. Update: As best I can tell, <style scoped> has been removed from the specs and even browsers that were supporting it have pulled it. Even as I write this update (August 2017) scoped styles are arguably more popular and desirable than ever before.
    1. I didn’t quite understand that until I saw this tweet from Ryan Florence, who is a genius when it comes to explaining the React programming model in ways that normal people can understand — ‘the question is not when does this effect run, the question is with which state does this effect synchronize with?’