13 Matching Annotations
  1. Aug 2019
    1. Could you imagine grading students on anger as an “outcome”?

      I'm imagining a course where the only way to earn an "A" would be to become totally outraged by its end.

  2. Apr 2019
    1. Despite the well-documented effects of anger, fear, and anxiety on the ability to reason, many programs continue to ignore the need to engage the safety system of the brain before trying to promote new ways of thinking. The last things that should be cut from school schedules are chorus, physical education, recess, and anything else involving movement, play, and joyful engagement. When children are oppositional, defensive, numbed out, or enraged, it’s also important to recognize that such “bad behavior” may repeat action patterns that were established to survive serious threats, even if they are intensely upsetting or off-putting.
  3. Mar 2019
  4. Jul 2018
  5. Oct 2013
    1. nger is always concerned with individuals -- a Callias or a Socrates -- whereas hatred is directed also against classes: we all hate any thief and any informer.

      I never thought about the difference between these two. This is a very interesting point.

    1. Hence people who are afflicted by sickness or poverty or love or thirst or any other unsatisfied desires are prone to anger and easily roused:

      They are angry and sometimes entitled because they have it "harder" than other people

    1. he emotion of anger: here we must discover (1) what the state of mind of angry people is, (2) who the people are with whom they usually get angry, and (3) on what grounds they get angry with them. It is not enough to know one or even two of these points; unless we know all three, we shall be unable to arouse anger in any one.

      Why does he want to be able to arouse anger in anyone? Does he want to make them stand up and make a difference? Or does he want to make them angry for fun?

    2. Take, for instance, the emotion of anger: here we must discover (1) what the state of mind of angry people is, (2) who the people are with whom they usually get angry, and (3) on what grounds they get angry with them

      anger...3

    1. The fact is that anger makes us confident -- that anger is excited by our knowledge that we are not the wrongers but the wronged, and that the divine power is always supposed to be on the side of the wronged.

      It is pretty true. We aren't objective when we are angry.

    1. Again, we feel no anger, or comparatively little, with those who have done what they did through anger: we do not feel that they have done it from a wish to slight us, for no one slights people when angry with them, since slighting is painless, [1380b] and anger is painful.

      I disagree. Even if I have no ill feelings toward someone who does something through anger and am myself in perfect disposition, their words can still hurt.

  6. Sep 2013
    1. Also those who speak ill of us, and show contempt for us, in connexion with the things we ourselves most care about: thus those who are eager to win fame as philosophers get angry with those who show contempt for their philosophy; those who pride themselves upon their appearance get angry with those who show contempt for their appearance and so on in other cases. We feel particularly angry on this account if we suspect that we are in fact, or that people think we are, lacking completely or to any effective extent in the qualities in question.

      Anger (emotion) in relation to image/success in philosophy. People only feels anger if what has been said about them is something they are unsure of (insecure). Anger thus may be a cue for someone's insecurities or uncertainties.

    2. The persons with whom we get angry are those who laugh, mock, or jeer at us, for such conduct is insolent

      The persons who the anger is directed at. Why aren't those that cause the pain included?