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  1. Last 7 days
  2. Jul 2021
  3. Jun 2021
  4. May 2021
    1. Ashish K. Jha, MD, MPH. (2020, December 1). There is something funny happening with COVID hospitalizations Proportion of COVID pts getting hospitalized falling A lot Just recently My theory? As hospitals fill up, bar for admission rising A patient who might have been admitted 4 weeks ago may get sent home now Thread [Tweet]. @ashishkjha. https://twitter.com/ashishkjha/status/1333636841271078912

  5. Apr 2021
    1. Implementation of a hospital information system in Limpopo Province

      failure of hospital information systems have affected people in Limpopo province as they still have to use the old school method for data collection about their patients. these will make it harder for leadership to monitor the progress of the strategies that they are using.

    1. Dr Kamna Kakkar. (2021, April 20). If things come down to this, doctors are going to be at the recieving end of all patient wrath. As much as I pray for Delhi patients’ lives, I pray for the safety of my colleagues. #DelhiLockdown https://t.co/Q7RaIj68RB [Tweet]. @drkamnakakkar. https://twitter.com/drkamnakakkar/status/1384535301243109380

    1. Mehdi Hasan. (2021, April 12). ‘Given you acknowledged...in March 2020 that Asian countries were masking up at the time, saying we shouldn’t mask up as well was a mistake, wasn’t it... At the time, not just in hindsight?’ My question to Dr Fauci. Listen to his very passionate response: Https://t.co/BAf4qp0m6G [Tweet]. @mehdirhasan. https://twitter.com/mehdirhasan/status/1381405233360814085

  6. Mar 2021
    1. Gupta, R. K., Marks, M., Samuels, T. H. A., Luintel, A., Rampling, T., Chowdhury, H., Quartagno, M., Nair, A., Lipman, M., Abubakar, I., Smeden, M. van, Wong, W. K., Williams, B., & Noursadeghi, M. (2020). Systematic evaluation and external validation of 22 prognostic models among hospitalised adults with COVID-19: An observational cohort study. MedRxiv, 2020.07.24.20149815. https://doi.org/10.1101/2020.07.24.20149815

  7. Feb 2021
    1. Nogués, X., Ovejero, D., Quesada-Gomez, J. M., Bouillon, R., Arenas, D., Pascual, J., Villar-Garcia, J., Rial, A., Gimenez-Argente, C., Cos, M. L., Rodriguez-Morera, J., Campodarve, I., Guerri-Fernandez, R., Pineda-Moncusí, M., & García-Giralt, N. (2021). Calcifediol Treatment and COVID-19-Related Outcomes (SSRN Scholarly Paper ID 3771318). Social Science Research Network. https://doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3771318

  8. Jan 2021
  9. Oct 2020
  10. Sep 2020
  11. Aug 2020
    1. Hewitt, J., Carter, B., Vilches-Moraga, A., Quinn, T. J., Braude, P., Verduri, A., Pearce, L., Stechman, M., Short, R., Price, A., Collins, J. T., Bruce, E., Einarsson, A., Rickard, F., Mitchell, E., Holloway, M., Hesford, J., Barlow-Pay, F., Clini, E., … Guaraldi, G. (2020). The effect of frailty on survival in patients with COVID-19 (COPE): A multicentre, European, observational cohort study. The Lancet Public Health, 5(8), e444–e451. https://doi.org/10.1016/S2468-2667(20)30146-8

  12. Jul 2020
  13. Jun 2020
  14. May 2020
  15. Apr 2020
  16. Mar 2020
  17. Dec 2019
  • Aug 2019
    1. Research from Chelsea and Westminster Hospital has found that placing art in the NHS trust has helped to improve patient wellbeing, decrease hospital stays and reduce anxiety, depression and pain.
  • Nov 2018
    1. The hospitalist movement mirrors the health care trend toward ever-increasing specialization. However, hospitalists are fundamentally generalist physicians who provide and coordinate inpatient care, often aided by myriad subspecialists. How can a generalist be a specialist? Specialties in medicine are traditionally defined by organ (eg, cardiology), disease (oncology), population (pediatrics), or procedure/technology (surgery or radiology). The hospitalist, on the other hand, is a "site-defined generalist specialist" (similar to emergency medicine physicians or critical care specialists), caring for patients with a wide array of organ derangements, illnesses, and ages within a specific location.45 Accordingly, the hospitalist should not be seen as a retreat from generalism and its emphasis on coordination and integration9,77 but rather as an affirmation of these values and as a surrogate for the primary care physician in the hospital. The competing pressures resulting from the distance between office and hospital as well as the requirement of around-the-clock availability make the hospital-based generalist a logical evolution. Hospital medicine has already satisfied many of the requirements of a specialty. A large and enthusiastic group of practitioners identify themselves not according to their training background but as hospitalists. The NAIP is almost certainly the fastest growing physician society in the United States. The field hosts several successful meetings each year and has its own clinical textbook.78 To establish themselves as members of a recognized medical specialty, hospitalists must identify a core skill set or body of knowledge and obtain the approval of credentialing organizations. Advocates of specialty status for hospitalists should be encouraged by the history of 2 other site-defined inpatient specialties: emergency medicine and critical care medicine. Like these relatively young fields, it seems probable that hospitalists will ultimately define a unique set of skills and competencies that will distinguish their field. The identification of practice-training mismatches (Table 2) represents an important first step. Credentialing organizations deliver the final stamp of approval on new specialties by creating a board certification or added qualification. Most new fields quickly agitate for such status, their motivation both practical and visceral. However, for unique reasons, few hospitalists are pressing this point. Many physicians—hospitalists and nonhospitalists—worry that if a credentialing body (such as the American Boards of Internal Medicine or Pediatrics) created a hospital medicine credential, health maintenance organizations might require that physicians possess this credential to care for inpatients. This would be unacceptable to many primary care physicians, who would be excluded from the hospital despite their desire and competence to continue practicing there. For this reason, we expect neither NAIP nor the relevant boards to promote separate credentials in the near future. Nevertheless, as evolutionary forces lead to specialized training, some formal specialty designation may emerge.79
    1. And earlier this year, CMS announced that by this time next year hospitalists would be assigned their own specialty designation code. SHM’s Public Policy Committee lobbied for the move for more than two years.
    2. By 2003, the term “hospitalist” had become ubiquitous enough that NAIP was renamed the Society of Hospital Medicine
    3. John Nelson, MD, MHM, and Winthrop Whitcomb, MD, MHM, founded the National Association of Inpatient Physicians (NAIP) a year after the NEJM paper, they promoted and held a special session at UCSF’s first “Management of the Hospitalized Patient” conference in April 1997
    4. Hospitalists are often referred to as the quarterbacks of the hospital. But even the best QB needs a good team to succeed. For HMGs, that roster increasingly includes nurse practitioners (NPs) and physician assistants (PAs).
    5. Aside from NPs and PAs, another extension of HM has been the gravitation in recent years of hospitalists into post-acute-care settings, including skilled-nursing facilities (SNFs), long-term care facilities, post-discharge clinics, and patient-centered homes.
    6. Hospitalists were seen as people to lead the charge for safety because they were already taking care of patients, already focused on reducing LOS and improving care delivery—and never to be underestimated, they were omnipresent, Dr. Gandhi says of her experience with hospitalists around 2000 at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston. “At least where I was, hospitalists truly were leaders in the quality and safety space, and it was just a really good fit for the kind of mindset and personality of a hospitalist because they’re very much … integrators of care across hospitals,” she says. “They interface with so many different areas of the hospital and then try to make all of that work better.”

      role of hospitalists in safety and quality

    7. “When the IOM report came out, it gave us a focus and a language that we didn’t have before,” says Dr. Wachter, who served as president of SHM’s Board of Directors and to this day lectures at SHM annual meetings. “But I think the general sensibility that hospitalists are about improving quality and safety and patients’ experience and efficiency—I think that was baked in from the start.”
    8. “The role of the hospitalist often is to take recommendations from a lot of different specialties and come up with the best plan for the patient,” says Tejal Gandhi, MD, MPH, CPPS, president and CEO of the National Patient Safety Foundation. “They’re the true patient advocate who is getting the cardiologist’s opinion, the rheumatologist’s opinion, and the surgeon’s opinion, and they come up with the best plan for the patient.”
    9. Dr. Merlino says he’s proud of the specialists who rotated through the hospital rooms of AIDS patients. But so many disparate doctors with no “quarterback” to manage the process holistically meant consistency in treatment was generally lacking
    10. Two major complaints emerged early on, Dr. Gorman says. Number one was the notion that hospitalists were enablers, allowing PCPs to shirk their long-established duty of shepherding their patients’ care through the walls of their local hospital. Number two, ironically, was the opposite: PCPs who didn’t want to cede control of their patients also moonlit taking ED calls that could generate patients for their own practice.
    11. Dr. Wachter and other early leaders also worried that patients, used to continuity of care with their primary-care doctors, would not take well to hospitalists. Would patients revolt against the idea of a new doctor seeing them every day?