136 Matching Annotations
  1. Oct 2021
  2. Sep 2021
    1. Exploring the consumption practices of the super-rich begins to highlight that they are best described as 'fast subjects' who dwell in what Castells (2000) terms the 'space of flows' rather than the 'space of places'.

      Good terminology- space of flows, denoting the necessity of (carbon intensive) travel to move from one place to another. Seen from the 19th century, even the average car-driving citizen of the 20th century is elite. A 100 hp car, which is now almost an average power rating of most internal combustion engines, is the power equivalent to the 19th century analog of maintaining 100 horses.

    2. it is apparent that the global elite must be regarded as transnational to the extent that they share similar global lifestyles. For Short and Kim (1999) the lifestyles of global managers present perhaps the clearest evidence that the shared consumption of similar goods and images is resulting in the creation of global lifestyles. Moving from city to city, the global managerial class characteristically occupies a series of corporate spaces designed for the international business traveller: international airports, business hotels, executive clubs, corporate health suites, restaurants and so on. The mobility of global managers is, however, eclipsed by that of the global super-rich. They are able to move easily from nation to nation by executive jet (rather than travelling by business class); they stay only in five-star hotels; they are able to access exclusive clubs and restaurants, they frequent ultra-expensive resorts in all continents, and collect the objet d'arts which can only be obtained in the most exclusive shops and auction houses. In short, their space-time routines centre on a globally-diffuse set of spaces regarded as 'the right places to see and be seen'. It is the nature of these spaces that we explore in our next section.

      The Deep Humanity challenge then, is to achieve an education program for these super-elites that shift aspirations from the extremely high carbon footprint lifestyle to a more frugal, within-planetary- boundary one. Without the context of a dedicated trans-disciplinary Human Inner Transformation (HIT) protocol, a scalable approach may prove challenging.

  3. Aug 2021
    1. I keep my index cards in chronological order : the newest card comes at front of the card box. All cards are clasified into four kinds and tagged according to the contents. The sequence is equivalent to my cultural genetic code. Although it may look chaotic at the beginning, it will become more regulated soon. Don't be afraid to sweep out your mind and capture them all. Make visible what is going on in your brain. Look for a pattern behind our life.

      Example of a edge-based taxonomy system for index cards.

    1. <small><cite class='h-cite via'> <span class='p-author h-card'>Manfred Kuehn</span> in Taking note: Luhmann's Zettelkasten (<time class='dt-published'>08/06/2021 00:16:23</time>)</cite></small>

      Note the use of the edge highlighted taxonomy system used on these cards:

      Similar to the so called high five indexing system I ran across recently.

    1. Keep in mind potential for waste or unnecessary spending. I think patients are starting to pay closer attention to the necessity of care rendered now because as more patients have high-deductible insurance plans, how they spend their money becomes critically relevant to them.

      A high-deductiable plan is an insurance which has a lower monthly payment at the cost of higher fees before the insurance covers the cost (deductible).

      Dr. Bauer from Hackensack Meridian Health sees more patients having higher-deductible insurance plans. This results in patients scrutinizing costs and tests because they have to pay for those directly.

  4. Jul 2021
    1. I've used something like this in a textbook before while also using different colored pens to help differentiate a larger taxonomy. I found it to be better for a smaller custom cpb that only had a narrow section of topics. In my larger, multi-volume commonplace, I have a separate volume that serves as an index and uses a method similar to John Locke's, though larger in scope and shape. Sadly in this case, the index would be much too large (with too many entries) to make the high five method practicable.

      reply to: https://www.reddit.com/r/commonplacebook/comments/oq12xs/has_anyone_used_this_indexing_system_curious_what/

  5. Jun 2021
    1. Natalie E. Dean, PhD. (2021, May 4). Another framing for this tweet: Wow, the US will soon be able to expand vaccine access to 12-15 year olds. Meanwhile, there are countries where healthcare workers treating COVID patients can’t access vaccines. What more can the US government do to support the global community? [Tweet]. @nataliexdean. https://twitter.com/nataliexdean/status/1389568668548349952

    1. Natalie E. Dean, PhD. (2021, May 4). The imminent FDA authorization of a vaccine for 12-15 year olds is great news, and adolescents should be able to access vaccine. But in the short term, we must also grapple with the ethics of vaccinating adolescents ahead of high-risk adults in other countries. [Tweet]. @nataliexdean. https://twitter.com/nataliexdean/status/1389381649314598914

  6. May 2021
  7. Apr 2021
    1. Binstock: You once referred to computing as pop culture. Kay: It is. Complete pop culture. I’m not against pop culture. Developed music, for instance, needs a pop culture. There’s a tendency to over-develop. Brahms and Dvorak needed gypsy music badly by the end of the nineteenth century. The big problem with our culture is that it’s being dominated, because the electronic media we have is so much better suited for transmitting pop-culture content than it is for high-culture content. I consider jazz to be a developed part of high culture. Anything that’s been worked on and developed and you [can] go to the next couple levels. Binstock: One thing about jazz aficionados is that they take deep pleasure in knowing the history of jazz. Kay: Yes! Classical music is like that, too. But pop culture holds a disdain for history. Pop culture is all about identity and feeling like you’re participating. It has nothing to do with cooperation, the past or the future—it’s living in the present. I think the same is true of most people who write code for money. They have no idea where [their culture came from]—and the Internet was done so well that most people think of it as a natural resource like the Pacific Ocean, rather than something that was man-made. When was the last time a technology with a scale like that was so error-free? The Web, in comparison, is a joke. The Web was done by amateurs.

      This is a great definition of pop culture and a good contrast to high-culture.

      Here's the link to the entire interview: https://link.springer.com/content/pdf/bbm%3A978-3-319-90008-7%2F1.pdf

    1. as it stands, this only goes to highlight what a miracle, what a classic for the ages Actraiser really is, whilst confirming itself as, unfortunately, one to avoid.
    1. Game looks great, ignore the 1 score review. Disgruntle co worker, perhaps? Perhaps a jealous fellow pupil... When all ither reviews are 7 or more and there's one review with a 1 score and a novel saying just why they thinks... you know something's not quite right. Hopefully this will go some way to normalising the score.
    1. This game is severely underrated. I genuinely do not understand all of the negative backlash it gets. It's a solid scribblenauts game with a ton of replay value and a way to past the time with friends. It's not perfect, as the motion controls do drag it down slightly, and some of the minigames offered are less than great, however it does not deserve the overwhelming hate it gets. It's a solid title in the series.
    2. I truly TRULY do not get the hate of this game. I am in my 40's. Played with 2 boys, 10 and 12. And we all had an amazing time playing the board game version of this for an hour. When it was over, the boys said, LETS PLAY IT AGAIN! The game is deep. Also has original sandbox mode with new levels. When they were about to leave, I surprise them by giving them the game as a gift. They were SO excited (and, I will simply buy another one for myself) I am simply BAFFLED at the hate and negativity for this game. Sure, a couple of the mini-games are not top notch. But there are many great ones within. At $40, solid deal. At $20 sale in most places, you have got to be kidding me. Steal it at that price. If you like Scribblenauts or are new to the Scribblenauts world, just buy it.
  8. Mar 2021
    1. much software requires continuous changes to meet new requirements and correct bugs, and re-engineering software each time a change is made is rarely practical.
  9. Feb 2021
    1. Dr. Tara C. Smith. (2021, January 23). A reminder: Especially among the elderly, some individuals will die shortly after receipt of the vaccine. What we need to understand is the background rate of such deaths. Are they higher then in the vaccinated population? We didn’t see that in the trials. Some data from @RtAVM. https://t.co/LJe9k1WJQC [Tweet]. @aetiology. https://twitter.com/aetiology/status/1352810672359428097

    1. Please note that this is a higher-level debugging tool that does not confront you with a 200-lines stack trace the way Ruby does it, but pinpoints the exceptional code and locates the problem on a task level. This is possible due to you structuring code into higher abstractions, tasks and activities.
    1. Using a terminus to indicate a certain outcome - in turn - allows for much stronger interfaces across nested activities and less guessing! For example, in the new endpoint gem, the not_found terminus is then wired to a special “404 track” that handles the case of “model not found”. The beautiful thing here is: there is no guessing by inspecting ctx[:model] or the like - the not_found end has only one meaning!
    1. i dont know why everyone wants to **** on everything that is not a "AAA" game, its not in its perfect state, but far from deserve a 3, i will give it a 9 so it counters the "just hate
  10. Jan 2021
    1. What’s the use of ie. snap libreoffice if it can’t access documents on a samba server in my workplace ? Should I really re-organize years of storage and work in my office for being able to use snap ? A too high price to pay, for the moment.
  11. Dec 2020
    1. The nation's coronavirus shaman, Dr. Anthony Fauci,

      The permanent government made up of technocratic, low experience diversity has now become intolerably dangerous.

    1. Used injudiciously in these circumstances, mathematics – and especially mathematical modelling – can serve to obfuscate rather than clarify, or at best add nothing at all to the situation other than the illusion of control.

      We find it very difficult to deal with uncertainty so are comforted by the high Priestesses of our era, vaguely aware of our hunger for the signs, symbols written in the runes descended from antiquity for portents of the future.

  12. Nov 2020
    1. I am all for providing good APIs to integrate systemd's concepts with other projects, but I'd try to keep things minimal there, and focus on as few sets of APIs as possible, but then keep the quality of them high.
  13. Oct 2020
    1. One of the primary tasks of engineers is to minimize complexity. JSX changes such a fundamental part (syntax and semantics of the language) that the complexity bubbles up to everything it touches. Pretty much every pipeline tool I've had to work with has become far more complex than necessary because of JSX. It affects AST parsers, it affects linters, it affects code coverage, it affects build systems. That tons and tons of additional code that I now need to wade through and mentally parse and ignore whenever I need to debug or want to contribute to a library that adds JSX support.
    1. Compounding the problem of iteration disguised as oscillation is the cost of change.
    2. Incurring high-cost changes isn't evolutionary design-it's oscillation caused by poor planning and requirements specification on a high cost-of-change component-it tips the anticipation/adaptation balance too far towards adaptation.
  14. Sep 2020
  15. Aug 2020
    1. Aspelund, K. M., Droste, M. C., Stock, J. H., & Walker, C. D. (2020). Identification and Estimation of Undetected COVID-19 Cases Using Testing Data from Iceland (Working Paper No. 27528; Working Paper Series). National Bureau of Economic Research. https://doi.org/10.3386/w27528

  16. Jul 2020
  17. Jun 2020
  18. May 2020
    1. Gudbjartsson, D. F., Helgason, A., Jonsson, H., Magnusson, O. T., Melsted, P., Norddahl, G. L., Saemundsdottir, J., Sigurdsson, A., Sulem, P., Agustsdottir, A. B., Eiriksdottir, B., Fridriksdottir, R., Gardarsdottir, E. E., Georgsson, G., Gretarsdottir, O. S., Gudmundsson, K. R., Gunnarsdottir, T. R., Gylfason, A., Holm, H., … Stefansson, K. (2020). Spread of SARS-CoV-2 in the Icelandic Population. New England Journal of Medicine, NEJMoa2006100. https://doi.org/10.1056/NEJMoa2006100

  19. Apr 2020
    1. “Even if experts are saying it’s really not going to make a difference, a little [part of] people’s brains is thinking, well, it’s not going to hurt. Maybe it’ll cut my risk just a little bit, so it’s worth it to wear a mask,” she says.
  20. Mar 2020
    1. This resource examines the demographics of people who enroll in nonprofit management degrees. The information provided supports understanding nonprofit management as well as coursework involved.

    1. Standardized test scores improved dramatically. In 2006, only 10% of Noyes' students scored "proficient" or "advanced" in math on the standardized tests required by the federal No Child Left Behind law. Two years later, 58% achieved that level. The school showed similar gains in reading. Because of the remarkable turnaround, the U.S. Department of Education named the school in northeast Washington a National Blue Ribbon School. Noyes was one of 264 public schools nationwide given that award in 2009. Michelle Rhee, then chancellor of D.C. schools, took a special interest in Noyes. She touted the school, which now serves preschoolers through eighth-graders, as an example of how the sweeping changes she championed could transform even the lowest-performing Washington schools. Twice in three years, she rewarded Noyes' staff for boosting scores: In 2008 and again in 2010, each teacher won an $8,000 bonus, and the principal won $10,000. A closer look at Noyes, however, raises questions about its test scores from 2006 to 2010. Its proficiency rates rose at a much faster rate than the average for D.C. schools. Then, in 2010, when scores dipped for most of the district's elementary schools, Noyes' proficiency rates fell further than average.
    1. Atlanta’s rampant test manipulation amplified calls for nationwide education reform. Seven years after the Atlanta Journal-Constitution first reported on testing problems, policymakers have failed to make significant progress toward changing the way students take standardized tests and how teachers interpret those scores. In fact, the problem has worsened, resulting in documented cheating in at least 40 states, since the APS cheating scandal first came to light. “Atlanta is the tip of the iceberg,” says Bob Schaeffer, public education director of FairTest, a nonprofit opposed to current testing standards. “Cheating is a predictable outcome of what happens when public policy puts too much pressure on test scores.” Some experts, including Schaeffer, point to the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 as a source of today’s testing problems, though others say the woes predated the law. Then-president George W Bush, who signed the measure in January 2002, aimed to boost national academic performance and close the achievement gap between white and minority students. To make that happen, the law relied upon standardized tests designed to hold teachers accountable for classroom improvements. Federal funding hinged on school improvements, as did the future of the lowest-performing schools. But teachers in many urban school districts already faced enormous challenges that fell outside their control – including high poverty, insufficient food access, and unstable family situations. Though high-stakes testing increased student achievement in some schools, the federal mandate turned an already-difficult challenge into a feat some considered insurmountable. The pressure led to problems. Dr Beverly Hall, the former APS superintendent who was praised for turning around student performance, was later accused of orchestrating the cheating operation. During her tenure, Georgia investigators found 178 educators had inflated test scores at 44 elementary and middle schools.
    1. Atlanta public schools. The urban school district has already suffered one of the most devastating standardized-testing scandals of recent years. A state investigation in 2011 found that 178 principals and teachers in the city school district were involved in cheating on standardized tests. Dozens of former employees of the school district have either been fired or have resigned, and 21 educators have pleaded guilty to crimes like obstruction and making false statements.
  21. Feb 2020