12 Matching Annotations
  1. Jun 2019
    1. rhythms in the uptake of the glucose analog 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG) precede the development of a functional TTFL

      This could be interesting as well. Metabolic issues run through chronic illness. As do circadian dysfunctions, diabetes susceptibility,

  2. Dec 2018
    1. Alzheimer's disease (AD) is not normally diagnosed until later in life, although evidence suggests that the disease starts at a much earlier age. Risk factors for AD, such as diabetes, hypertension and obesity, are known to have their affects during mid-life, though events very early in life, including maternal over-nutrition, can predispose offspring to develop these conditions. This study tested whether over-nutrition during pregnancy and lactation affected the development of AD in offspring, using a transgenic AD mouse model. Female triple-transgenic AD dam mice (3xTgAD) were exposed to a high-fat (60% energy from fat) or control diet during pregnancy and lactation. After weaning (at 3 weeks of age), female offspring were placed on a control diet and monitored up until 12 months of age during which time behavioural tests were performed. A transient increase in body weight was observed in 4-week-old offspring 3xTgAD mice from dams fed a high-fat diet. However, by 5 weeks of age the body weight of 3xTgAD mice from the maternal high-fat fed group was no different when compared to control-fed mice. A maternal high-fat diet led to a significant impairment in memory in 2- and 12-month-old 3xTgAD offspring mice when compared to offspring from control fed dams. These effects of a maternal high-fat diet on memory were accompanied by a significant increase (50%) in the number of tau positive neurones in the hippocampus. These data demonstrate that a high-fat diet during pregnancy and lactation increases memory impairments in female 3xTgAD mice and suggest that early life events during development might influence the onset and progression of AD later in life.
  3. Oct 2018
    1. Pharmacologic Therapy for Type 2 Diabetes

      ADA-EASD Consensus Report reflects current treatment recommendations as endorsed by the ADA and the PPC.

      On October 5, 2018, the consensus report “Management of Hyperglycemia in Type 2 Diabetes: ADA-EASD Consensus Report 2018” was published. The consensus report was developed by a writing group consisting of representatives from the ADA and EASD. The consensus report addresses approaches to glycemic management in adults with type 2 diabetes with the goal of reducing complications and maintaining quality of life in the context of comprehensive cardiovascular risk management and patient-centered care. The ADA Professional Practice Committee (PPC) was involved in the review and approval of the final consensus report. The consensus recommendations and approach to glycemic management in adults with type 2 diabetes presented within the report reflects the current view of the ADA. Please find a link to the consensus document here: http://dx.doi.org/10.2337/dci18-0033

      Reference:

      Davies MJ, D’Alessio DA, Fradkin J, Kernan WN, Mathieu C, Mingrone G, Rossing P, Tsapas A, Wexler DJ, Buse JB: Management of hyperglycemia in type 2 diabetes, 2018: a consensus report by the American Diabetes Association (ADA) and the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD). Diabetes Care Oct 2018; DOI: 10.2337/dci18-0033

      Rationale/Reason for Change:

      Management of Hyperglycemia in Type 2 Diabetes: ADA-EASD Consensus Report 2018 reflects current treatment recommendations as endorsed by the ADA and the PPC.

      Annotation published: October 5, 2018. Annotation approved by PPC: September 20, 2018.

      Suggested citation: American Diabetes Association. 8. Pharmacologic approaches to glycemic treatment: Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes—2018 [web annotation]. Diabetes Care 2018;41(Suppl. 1):S73–S85. Retrieved from https://hyp.is/1p2zesvFEeioRdNqCoou5A/clinical.diabetesjournals.org/content/36/1/14

  4. Apr 2018
  5. Jan 2018
  6. Dec 2017
  7. Nov 2017
    1. A visual exploration of the link between statin use and the risk of Diabetes in a subpopulation of patients with subclinical hypothyroidism.

      This is an interactive graph created with Biovista Vizit; nodes and links can be further explored to view supporting bibliography and molecular mechanism of action.

  8. Aug 2017
    1. The first note in Biovista Vizit the free unbiased visual pubmed search tool using hypothes.is

      Here is an example graph (click to go to the live graph)

  9. Jul 2017
    1. Insulin sends a message to our cells that nutrients are available, meaning it’s time to grow and proliferate. When the levels of the hormones drop, it’s a signal to cells that its time to enter a life-extending mode of conservation. Such a system makes evolutionary sense.

      Very good explanation!

  10. Apr 2017
    1. She and her colleagues are using neural networks—complex mathematical systems for identifying patterns in data—to recognize diabetic retino­pathy, a leading cause of blindness among US adults.

      Wow, this is a very interesting application!

  11. Jul 2016
    1. spiritual senses of the occultist as are externally perceptible colors to the physical eye. This etheric body can actually be seen by the clairvoyant. It is the principle which calls the inorganic materials into life, which, summoning them from their lifeless condition, weaves them into the thread of life's garment.

      This reminds me of the diabetes and heart disease epidemic. If through forced choice you can engender a species of people to change the make up of their blood through outside chemicals and OVER FEEDING everyone sugar rendering most people diabetic you can in essence control the emerging medical needs of a society dependent on new forms of health care and medicines. The obama care state.

  12. May 2016
    1. Slower metabolisms were not the only reason the contestants regained weight, though. They constantly battled hunger, cravings and binges. The investigators found at least one reason: plummeting levels of leptin. The contestants started out with normal levels of leptin. By the season’s finale, they had almost no leptin at all, which would have made them ravenous all the time. As their weight returned, their leptin levels drifted up again, but only to about half of what they had been when the season began, the researchers found, thus helping to explain their urges to eat.Leptin is just one of a cluster of hormones that control hunger, and although Dr. Hall and his colleagues did not measure the rest of them, another group of researchers, in a different project, did. In a one-year study funded by Australia’s National Health and Medical Research Council, Dr. Joseph Proietto of the University of Melbourne and his colleagues recruited 50 overweight people who agreed to consume just 550 calories a day for eight or nine weeks. They lost an average of nearly 30 pounds, but over the next year, the pounds started coming back.