10 Matching Annotations
  1. Jan 2021
    1. On the other hand, in the process of roasting such polymeric compounds as melanoidins (which are potent antioxidants) and other compounds are formed.

      This is more evidence that cooking is neutral or positive, provided temperatures are not excessive. I doubt this would convince raw foodists, but it may.

  2. Dec 2020
    1. similar effects were demonstrated by placebo as well.

      That's concerning. Note that the treatment group performed ever so slightly better than placebo. I'm guessing that that is either due to random chance, or a benefit that any anti-inflammatory plant may provide.

      I'd be curious to know why nettle. The authors of this paper seem to think it is the anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activity. However, they are merely following up on past research. They mention that nettle has been used worldwide as an alternative medicine. Therefore, the original research may be based on the traditional uses of the plant.

      If nettle does in fact work, I see three possibilities. Nettle may have unique benefit that this study wasn't powered enough to find. Nettle may may have benefit that any plant anti-inflammatory plant would have. Finally, they may not have been using nettle properly.

  3. Nov 2020
    1. Rosemary enhanced the protective efficacy of AREDS and led to the greatest effect on the retinal genome in animals reared in high environmental light. Chronic administration of rosemary antioxidants may be a useful adjunct to the therapeutic benefit of AREDS in slowing disease progression in AMD.

      This is not in the least surprising. Dietary antioxidants also protect the skin during sunlight exposure.

      Oxidative stress likely also plays a role in diabetic retinopathy. It plays a role in the aging process itself. That said, there is probably a limit to protective powers of antioxidants. Nonetheless, I don't think that that limit has ever been realized in any population. I doubt we've even come close in rats.

    1. Acai Berry Pulp/Skin/Puree Powder

      I found a study on acai and blood sugar, but they used healthy overweight subjects. The relative reduction in postprandial glucose was substantial. However, since the subjects' baseline fasting glucose was normal, the drop was not significant. We have every reason to think that fasting blood sugar would be reduced in diabetic subjects.

    2. Baobab Fruit Powder, Dried

      I was unable to find a study on baobab on diabetes or metabolic syndrome. However, given the effectiveness of amla, curcumin, and acai, it is likely effective. There is also some evidence for many other antioxidant sources, which backs up the idea that any source will do.

    3. Sumac Bran, Raw

      I've found one study on sumac for type 2 diabetes. There seems to be two separate write-ups on the same data.

      Oddly, 3 grams sumac did not perform as well as 3 grams amla. I can think of several possible explanations. The most likely explanation is that they used the whole grain rather than the bran. I assume the grain is what's used traditionally, but I'm having difficulty finding information about this. The bran has over 3 times the ORAC compared to the whole grain. It's likely that the bran is both hard to find and expensive.

  4. Aug 2020
  5. Jul 2020
  6. Jan 2020
    1. CONCLUSION: This randomized double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial demonstrated that Amla could reduce frequencies of heartburn and regurgitation and improve heartburn and regurgitation severity in patients with NERD.

      Is there anything it can't do? I have noted, however, that larger doses cause nausea for me. That is, 3 or more grams on an empty stomach. I just vomited after taking 7.5 grams before my meal, but I have not yet established the causal link. It is the largest amount I've ever taken at one time. I suspect that it may have contributed significantly, but that it was also one out of half a dozen factors.

  7. Dec 2017
    1. Taking antioxidant supplements to reduce muscles soreness after exercise could have almost no effect, according to a new  Cochrane Review

      Taking antioxidant supplements to reduce muscles soreness after exercise could have almost no effect, according to a new Cochrane Review