11 Matching Annotations
  1. Jun 2021
    1. L-theanine augmentation of antipsychotic therapy can ameliorate positive, activation, and anxiety symptoms in schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder patients.

      This is not surprising. It seems that L-theanine is clinically useful in the exact ways one would expect.

  2. May 2021
    1. The researchers had asked everyone in their game a set of questions: Did people follow the game? Did they understand the rules? Did they think it was fair? These questions were designed to measure which salespeople had “entered the magic circle,” meaning that they agreed to be bound by the game’s rules rather than the normal rules that ordinarily guide their work. After all, if people haven’t entered a game mentally, there’s no real point to it.Sure enough, the salespeople who felt that the basketball game was a load of baloney actually felt worse about work after the game was introduced, and their sales performance declined slightly. The game benefited only the salespeople who had fully bought into it—they became significantly more upbeat at work.

      Ethan Mollick and Nancy Rothbard experiment https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2277103 about gamification in a sales setting shows that gamification only works for those who buy into it.

      Is this similar to ideas like the placebo effect or potentially for cases like Eastern Medicine where one might need to buy into it for the effects to matter to them?

    1. Hilda Bastian, PhD. (2021, February 6). Unofficial unnamed AstraZeneca insider says they are doing the interim analysis for the US trial of the Oxford vaccine. AstraZeneca spokesperson says 4-6 weeks till data release. Https://t.co/VUHgbHN02d One is wrong? Or they’ll release only when have FDA minimum follow-up? Https://t.co/LgjfX8AIti [Tweet]. @hildabast. https://twitter.com/hildabast/status/1357862227106095105

  3. Apr 2021
  4. Mar 2021
  5. Feb 2021
    1. Carl T. Bergstrom. (2021, January 31). A somewhat technical thread about measuring vaccine efficacy. We’re used to the notion that certain properties of tests for disease depend on prevalence: Positive and negative predictive value do, for example, whereas sensitivity and specificity do not. [Tweet]. @CT_Bergstrom. https://twitter.com/CT_Bergstrom/status/1355762090078703621

    1. Carl T. Bergstrom. (2020, December 5). I don’t have a background in medical ethics but this makes me uncomfortable unless it was very clearly explained to study participants at enrollment, and to some degree even then. H/t @RMCarpiano https://t.co/WUE1mXgjJG https://t.co/yLXkxIa5O8 [Tweet]. @CT_Bergstrom. https://twitter.com/CT_Bergstrom/status/1335152266840424449

  6. Aug 2020
  7. May 2020
  8. Nov 2015
    1. In one study, Lyubomirsky posted online two nearly identical requests for study participants. The only difference? One version told participants the study was meant to increase their happiness, while the other simply told them they’d take part in a cognitive exercise. After performing the same happiness-inducing activities, the people who signed up for the happiness study—the group Lyubomirsky saw as more “motivated” to become happier—gained more from the study than those who signed up for the other exercise.

      The study. This sounds very similar to the placebo effect, so I wonder if they have checked to see what effects they would find if they picked activities previously classified as neutral.