36 Matching Annotations
  1. Sep 2020
    1. Specifically, social workers assist families by making referrals for alcohol and drug assessments, inpatient and outpatient treatment programs, family therapy, and support groups such as Alcoholics Anonymous

      What is the success rate of these programs? They DO NOT work... People with addiction problems need one on one help so they can understand their situation and what's going on i in their heads, and how they are impacting their children....

      The groups give them a swamp/ place to dwell. With Lillian, it was a place for her to feel sorry for herself and for others to "comfort" her. When she came home, we were the bad guys for not understanding.

      • programs are not a one size fit all. If they work at all.
    1. You can also find a therapist through “fast therapy” apps like TalkSpace, which connects you to a licensed therapist through not just video chat, but texting, too. Out-of-pocket TalkSpace subscriptions start at $260 per month — which sounds like a lot up front, but it gets you unlimited text, video, and audio access to a therapist five days a week. For comparison, IRL therapy might cost $200 per month in insurance copays for one 45-minute session once a week.

      [[TalkSpace]] has had some questionable pratices around ethics recently - source

    2. First, let’s figure out how you’re going to pay for it. If you don’t have insurance (or even if you do), there are resources available to you at no cost. Consider looking into Federally Qualified Health Centers, community-based centers that offer care including mental health and substance use services

      Services like [[InkBlot]], your works [[Health Care Spending Account]] - in the past I had good luck with the Aspiria - they got me setup with a good therapist from Shift Collab Therapy

      Even trying to figure out what my starting point was too much - but being able to use a service like that to help connect me was really important.

  2. Aug 2020
    1. Luban, J., Sattler, R., Mühlberger, E., Graci, J. D., Cao, L., Weetall, M., Trotta, C., Colacino, J. M., Bavari, S., Strambio-De-Castillia, C., Suder, E. L., Wang, Y., Soloveva, V., Cintron-Lue, K., Naryshkin, N. A., Pykett, M., Welch, E. M., O’Keefe, K., Kong, R., … Peltz, S. (2020). The DHODH Inhibitor PTC299 Arrests SARS-CoV-2 Replication and Suppresses Induction of Inflammatory Cytokines. BioRxiv, 2020.08.05.238394. https://doi.org/10.1101/2020.08.05.238394

  3. Jul 2020
  4. Jun 2020
  5. May 2020
  6. Apr 2020
    1. Abdulla, A., Wang, B., Qian, F., Kee, T., Blasiak, A., Ong, Y. H., Hooi, L., Parekh, F., Soriano, R., Olinger, G. G., Keppo, J., Hardesty, C. L., Chow, E. K., Ho, D., & Ding, X. (n.d.). Project IDentif.AI: Harnessing Artificial Intelligence to Rapidly Optimize Combination Therapy Development for Infectious Disease Intervention. Advanced Therapeutics, n/a(n/a), 2000034. https://doi.org/10.1002/adtp.202000034

  7. May 2019
    1. first target the patients at highest risk of relapse;

      Clinical trials will most certainly first include those patients with the highest risk of relapse. However, long term, everything will depend on the risk/ benefit trade off: if an effective, simple, well-tolerated and cost-effective treatment was available (let's imagine a single short low-dose PD1 for any early Melanoma patient) that prevented progression for most patients would be very different from a highly toxic, expensive treatment that doesn't work for everyone (think Ipi 10mg/kg adjuvant)- so everything is in the trade-off

  8. Feb 2019
    1. In extreme cases, urge them to see a counselor

      I quibble with the use of the word "extreme" here. The examples in this article seem more like issues of strong beliefs or unthinking comments, but hot moments also include deeply personal disclosures. Reserving counseling for "extreme" cases is stigmatizing, especially as we see more students in higher ed who have experience of mental health treatment. Many students involved in "hot moments" might benefit from being referred to the resources available in student life offices and/or counseling and faculty should be aware enough of these resources to suggest them with comfort.

  9. Jan 2019
    1. It’s not a problem I can solve, but it’s a reality I can acknowledge, a paradigm through which I can understand my actions.

      writing = therapy :)

  10. Aug 2018
  11. Jan 2018
  12. Nov 2017
    1. Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT)  PCIT works with parents and children together, teaching them skills to interact in a positive, productive way. It is effective for kids between the ages of 2 and 7, and usually requires 14 to 17 weekly sessions. In PCIT, parents receive live coaching (via a bug in the ear) from a therapist who watches from behind a one-way mirror as they and their child perform a series of tasks, and parents practice specific responses to both desired and undesired behavior. PCIT is the most practice-intensive, Dr. Rouse says, as parents demonstrate mastery of each skill before going on to the next one. “It starts out with positive interactions, then waits till parents reach mastery of these skills before moving on to discipline strategies to improve oppositional behavior.” Dr. Rouse says he might propose PCIT if he feels that the parents need a lot of one-on-one attention in terms of how they’re interacting with their child, and “especially if it feels like there have been a lot of coercive negative interactions.” Sometimes it’s very important for parents, he adds, “to learn how to be with their kid in a positive way.” He adds that he doesn’t always suggest PCIT even if the child falls within PCIT’s age range. “It’s not just age, it’s looking at the situation. If there needs to be a really strong dose of positive interactions as the first thing and the child is under 7, I’ll lean more toward PCIT.”
  13. Apr 2017
    1. I have had IBS essentially all my life. At least as far back as I can remember. This is a very interesting experiement. Hopefully scientists can use this as a springboard for either further research, or ideally, to find a solution. IBS negatively impacts quality of life for many sufferers.

      Isn't the flipped experiment a clear indication that FTT (fecal transplant therapy) can help alleviating IBS? If the reverse is true, there might be great value in getting your microbiome fixed/infused by healthy microbiota from donors.