951 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. One of the flaws of using Digital Mappa for projects like this appears to be that it acts more as a viewer (as a result of it's original use with maps) than as something for text. As a result, when looking at various pages, the URL of the page and it's attendant resources doesn't change, so one can't link to particular resources within the work, nor can one easily use digital tools (Hypothes.is for example), to anchor and annotate portions of the text.

    2. Susanna Collet's Commonplace Book

    1. This is a facsimile and diplomatic edition of Codex Vercellensis CXVII, Archivio e Biblioteca Capitolare di Vercelli.

      An interesting example of a digitized version of a book.

    1. Despite the surprising lack of digital editions, the commonplace book, more than any other genre of writing, seems well suited to a digital format, since, by its very structure, it is a linked web of fragments that have been “coded” and “marked up” with metadata. For this reason, we have put much thought and planning into which tools to use and how design this digital edition.
  2. Apr 2021
    1. While it is impossible to imagine surveillance capitalism without the digital, it is easy to imagine the digital without surveillance capitalism.

      Important point: this is not the only version of digital culture that is possible.

    1. Though its format can be copied and manipulated, HTML doesn’t make that easy.

      In fact, HTML makes it very easy (true for the reasons that lead Mark to write that it can be copied and manipulated). It's contemporary authoring systems and the typical author-as-publisher and the choices they make that are what makes this difficult.

      The future of rich media lies in striving to be more like dead media (or at least mining it for insights by better understanding it through thoughtful study), rather than the misguided attempts we've been living inside.

      (This is something that I've done a 180 on in the last year or so.)

    2. It’s designed so that whoever produced the video controls how it appears, and how it’s used.

      It is exactly that "timid" ("tepid"?) attempt at dynamism that has led to these circumstances.

    1. This looks fascinating. I'm not so much interested in the coding/programming part as I am the actual "working in public" portions as they relate to writing, thinking, blogging in the open and sharing that as part of my own learning and growth as well as for sharing that with a broader personal learning network. I'm curious what lessons might be learned within this frame or how educators and journalists might benefit from it.

    1. Pero millones de niños no disfrutan de ese acceso, o su acceso es intermitente o de calidad inferior y, con mucha frecuencia, son los niños que ya están más desposeídos. Esto agrava aún más su privación, denegándoles efectivamente las aptitudes y el conocimiento que podrían ayudarles a desarrollar su potencial y a romper los ciclos intergeneracionales de desventaja y de pobreza

      Sin duda esta brecha digital, es uno de los factores que aportan al analfabetismo digital, podría decir que son factores paralelos que a su vez están limitando el conocimiento y las capacidades que pueden llegar a recibir quienes si tienen acceso de calidad a estas herramientas

    2. La tecnología digital supone ya uno de los cambios más radicales de nuestro tiempo,

      Esta idea de lo inevitable que carcteriza el discurso de las tecnologías en general, se supone que responde a un cambio cultural de la época y que toca a todas las personas, incluyendo a los niños; sin embargo tapa otras motivaciones, otras urgencias para esta innovación tecnológica que es bastante evidente; se relaciona con los planes de negocios y económicos, los planes de las empresas tecnológicas para las cuales la idea de este cambio inevitable, desde los cuales se presentan sus propuestas digitales, es funcional a sus estrategias de mercado. las empresas necesitan que se crea que se tiene que entrar en esos escenarios de cambios y de innovación para poder vender los productos que sacan al mercado.

    3. Aunque la mayoría de los niños que están en línea lo ven como una experiencia positiva,

      La idea de una era digital se ha naturalizado, por tanto los niños acceden a su uso e interactúan en las redes con desconocimiento frente a los riesgos que estos medios pueden contener.

    4. nternet es todas estas cosas, que reflejan y amplifican lo mejor y lo peor de la naturaleza humana. Es una herramienta que siempre se usará para hacer el bien y para hacer el mal. Nuestra labor consiste en mitigar los daños y ampliar las oportunidades que la tecnología digital hace posible.

      Preparar a los niños para enfrentar los nuevos tiempos, no es prepararlos para adaptarse sino para resistir la constante violencia a la que el mundo globalizado con su economía y sus relaciones de consumo somenten a las personas ( en especial a la infancia) en esta era (tecnológica). Demanda de la escuela y nosotros los maestros, la construcción de un espacio ético desde el cual podamos construir junto con los niños una mirada crítica sobre esas reaciones que se están dando y buscar formas de deconstrucción, de desingenuación de esas mismas relaciones tan perjudiciales, tan nocivas.

    1. There are surprisingly few digital editions of commonplace books, especially given how the genre lends itself to digitization. What we've made isn't perfect but we hope it helps others think through/with these types of books. More about that here: digitalbookhistory.com/colletscommonp…

      I've seen some people building digital commonplace books in real time, but I'm also curious to see more academics doing it and seeing what tools and platforms they're using to do it.

      Given the prevalence for these in text, I'd be particularly curious to see them being done as .txt or .md files and then imported into platforms like Obsidian, Roam Research, Org Mode, TiddlyWiki, et al for cross linking and backlinking.

      I've seen some evidence of people doing some of this with copies of the bible, but yet to see anyone digitize and cross link old notebooks or commonplace books.

  3. Mar 2021
    1. We think of mobile phones as a transformational technology,

      The transformative role of mobile phones is primarily in how they are enabling the other half of the global population to access the internet via mobile networks.

    1. An NFT is a crypto-token on a blockchain. The token is virtual — the thing you own is a cryptographic key to a particular address on the blockchain — but legally, it’s property that you can buy, own or sell like any other property.

      It's already caused society a lot of harm to treat corporations as people. Turning digital assets into property seems like a similar mistake in the making.

    1. López, J. A. M., Arregui-Garcĺa, B., Bentkowski, P., Bioglio, L., Pinotti, F., Boëlle, P.-Y., Barrat, A., Colizza, V., & Poletto, C. (2020). Anatomy of digital contact tracing: Role of age, transmission setting, adoption and case detection. MedRxiv, 2020.07.22.20158352. https://doi.org/10.1101/2020.07.22.20158352

    1. It is perhaps predictable that, instead of presenting a bulwark against stratification, technology outcomes have tracked society's growing inequality. A yawning chasm of disparities is playing out in our phones at the same time it has come to shape our economic and political lives.
    1. I returned to another OER Learning Circle and wrote an ebook version of a Modern World History textbook. As I wrote this, I tested it out on my students. I taught them to use the annotation app, Hypothesis, and assigned them to highlight and comment on the chapters each week in preparation for class discussions. This had the dual benefits of engaging them with the content, and also indicating to me which parts of the text were working well and which needed improvement. Since I wasn't telling them what they had to highlight and respond to, I was able to see what elements caught students attention and interest. And possibly more important, I was able to "mind the gaps', and rework parts that were too confusing or too boring to get the attention I thought they deserved.

      This is an intriguing off-label use case for Hypothes.is which is within the realm of peer-review use cases.

      Dan is essentially using the idea of annotation as engagement within a textbook as a means of proactively improving it. He's mentioned it before in Hypothes.is Social (and Private) Annotation.

      Because one can actively see the gaps without readers necessarily being aware of their "review", this may be a far better method than asking for active reviews of materials.

      Reviewers are probably not as likely to actively mark sections they don't find engaging. Has anyone done research on this space for better improving texts? Certainly annotation provides a means for helping to do this.

    1. No gardener can become a good gardener without getting over the fear of pruning, and no good gardener can become a great gardener without approaching pruning as part of the craft. Chop, whack, snip. It hurt, to see everyone almost exposed to their roots, not knowing whether they’d make it or not–driving home the guilt that was admitting that I had not taken good care of them. If they didn’t succeed, it would be my fault.

      Een mooie analogie of het nu om notities gaat, je tuin, je werk of iets anders. Je moet durven weglaten. Durven verwijderen

    1. When discussing the topic of digital citizenship, digital health, digital safety or whatever it may be called in your school or district there are certain universal themes that seem to surface and be at the heart of the issue.  Whether it is through topics of cyberbullying, viewing (or posting) inappropriate content, or plagiarism these and other topics of concern that are discussed most among parents and educators. This section geared towards the “social” element defines the general topic of digital citizenship and its main elements of discussion.  Humans are social by nature.  People choosing to group with others like themselves in cities, states, and countries.  As members of a community we tend to connect with those like us. This can be the difficult aspect of trying to interact with others online, everyone is given the opportunity to join this thing called the Internet and even though we try and stay with those most like us, it is almost impossible not to bump into others that want to try and change our minds, our beliefs.

      In reflection, it’s astounding to have read how much we take for granted when it comes to digital access and privacy issues of this digital age. By taking a more proactive stance in the responsibility, continuous awareness and education of social, ethical laws and access related to digital use would ensure a continued lineage of digital citizens around the world in this era and beyond.

    2. Protect Yourself/Protect Others

      Learning to protect oneself and know the laws that govern internet activities because many laws and federal regulations apply to youth and online social technology which would require to explore approaches to teaching students about their role as responsible digital citizens. The past decade has seen an exponential increase in digital tools and opportunities, which carry the need for students to master a new set of life skills for behaving responsibly online.

    3. Teachers and administrators need to be aware of their community and who may or may not have access, not only in school but at home as well.

      Example.. students from low-income countries may not have reliable or affordable access to the internet in which the elements include digital access, digital commerce, digital communication, digital literacy, digital etiquette, digital law, digital rights and responsibilities, digital health and wellness, and digital security. Other examples like the prolific use of the internet in tertiary education advocates the responsible use of technology, in which practices and standards are essential informants on the importance of digital citizenship.

    4. Digital citizenship is the continuously developing norms of appropriate, responsible, and empowered technology use.

      In my opinion, I would describe ‘digital citizenship’ as having best practices of using technology appropriately for the benefit of all digital citizens. Where this encompasses the participative quality of a member to engage ethically in a digital community which finds attributes such as digital literacy, communication, education, etiquette, online safety are crucial, the understanding of how information is produced and valued are also of great importance.

    1. When this happens, Blackness—or what is perceived as Black identity—thrives outside of context. It's diluted and remixed to a dizzying degree. Black people lose control over how their humanity is presented.

      Is this not an ever present factor of life though? In the US, the media has controlled how the humanity of white people, black people, Arab people, and everyone else in the world is presented. In North Korea, Russia, and China, they've controlled how the humanity of Americans is presented. Africans certainly have zero control over how our humanity is presented to the rest of the world.

    1. Digital Twin Technology is one among the top 10 strategic technology trends named by Gartner Inc. in 2017. Digital Twin concept represents the convergence of the physical and the virtual world where every industrial product will get a dynamic digital representation. Throughout the product development life cycle, right from the design phase to the deployment phase, organizations can have a complete digital foot print of their products. These ‘connected digital things’ generate data in real time, and this helps businesses in better analyze and predict the problems in advance or give early warnings,

      This technology is very useful in todays world

  4. Feb 2021
    1. A fairly comprehensive list of problems and limitations that are often encountered with data as well as suggestions about who should be responsible for fixing them (from a journalistic perspective).

    1. The Garden of Forking Paths

      El Jardín de los Senderos que se Bifurcan.

      After reading the short story once more, I can't see how it relates to this context beyond the title. Sure, it's a garden and has paths, but the ideas behind it have nothing to do with how we build knowledge, it is all about how we perceive time and potentially how we interpret the many-worlds theory.

    2. In the stream metaphor you don’t experience the Stream by walking around it and looking at it, or following it to its end. You jump in and let it flow past. You feel the force of it hit you as things float by. It’s not that you are passive in the Stream. You can be active. But your actions in there — your blog posts, @ mentions, forum comments — exist in a context that is collapsed down to a simple timeline of events that together form a narrative.

      This describes exactly what frustrates me the most about online discussions. Especially on Twitter, it is so hard to build coherence on previous (and future) insight.

    1. The first web browser was also an editor. The idea being that not only could everyone read content on the web, but they could also help create it. It was to be a collaborative space for everyone.

      This is really interesting. I think we have got used to the fact that the internet is mostly a passive space - where we search for things. Perhaps we sometime ask questions. And there are only some spaces, where we are actually creative ourselves.

      Hypothes.is is the powerful idea that you can annotate the web.

      Solid is a more radical solution. It is the idea that you can also control what data you share with other.

    1. Spent some time browsing through the wealth of resources here. What a great site. Greg McVerry will appreciate it and many of the curated resources which he may be able to remix and reuse.

    2. I'm curious how a model like Homebrew Website Club or regular DoOO meetups might be similar to or borrow from a teaching model like this class?

    1. Free, Open, Flexible: Rethinking Learning Materials Online

      One of my early sessions on Open Education, with an emphasis on leveraging the material we create in the course of our work.

    1. Essentially, we study culture at an "on the ground" level – looking for the individual stories, rich details, particular nuances, and thick description you can only find by spending extended time with people in their daily lives.

      I'm reading this and can't help but think it's sort of what Jack Jamieson did in writing his recent thesis Independent Together: Building and Maintaining Values in a Distributed Web Infrastructure.

      It's definitely the sort of thing that Maggie Appleton may appreciate.

  5. Jan 2021
    1. This study highlights the potential of digital technology expanding creative palettes and clinical intervention tools for therapeutic sessions.
    1. access

      Also seeing "access" repeated early in the letter. I count 51 matches for "access" in the letter. Now seems like a good time to raise how digital redlining affects students' access to high-speed internet.

  6. Dec 2020
    1. The word florilegium literally means a gathering of flowers — flos (flowers) and legere (to gather).

      Is this the origin of what people have recently started calling digital gardens?

    1. I spin out notes and potential Notions from my project notes, as I encounter things in my work where some idea or thought jumps out. Those potential Notions I put in a folder called proto notions, inside my GotFP

      I just include these initial thoughts / ideas in the same Obsidian vault as my permanent notes. I think of them as "permanent notes in training" or, as some people have started calling them, seedlings (in the language of the digital gardening crowd).

  7. Nov 2020
    1. More importantly, both systems assume that writers have full access to the full conversation that prompts them into writing. On Substack, there are too many walls dividing up the garden.
    1. What I'm starting to realize is that I don't seem to be building a “digital garden” with Obsidian. What I'm building seems more of a personal wiki, a personal knowledge-base, a second brain.

      Very insightful and eerily in parallel to my own thoughts regarding my attempt at Digital Gardening with Notion.

    1. Instant

      The word “Instant” suggests immediate access for all students. However, digital redlining and a lack of high-speed internet means that, for many, “Instant” is not possible.

    1. digital natives?

      let's get rid of this term so those in power are no longer abe to shirk responsibility of teaching children and young people digital skills

    1. 2020 events have accelerated digital transformation, and COVID-19-driven digital adoption rates have covered decades in days: E-commerce grew 10 years in 8 weeks Telemedicine grew 10 times in 15 days Remote working has 20 time more participants in 3 months Remote learning grew 250 million in 2 weeks Online entertainment grew 7 years in 5 months (I must admit that Netflix has become my best friend in this pandemic …)

      Zeigt, wie wichtig es ist, dass Organisationen digital operieren können. Quellen für diese Zahlen?

  8. Oct 2020
    1. Der Guardian über das estnische Bildungssystem und den Covid-19-Lockdown. Rechtzeitige Digitalisierung hat dafür gesorgt, dass die Schulen so leistungsfähig geblieben sind wie davor.

    1. While individuals use these tools in the hope that their training will improve their performance, this relationship is not a given. This paper proposes that an individual's level of digital literacy affects her performance through its impact on her performance and effort expectations. To explain the influence of digital li

      This is the very reason I selected this paper. Digital literacy is also a factor in determining one's technological acumen.

    1. How is digital fluency different from digital literacy? In learning a foreign language, a literate person can read, speak, and listen for understanding in the new language. A fluent person can create something in the language: a story, a poem, a play, or a conversation. Similarly, digital literacy is an understanding of how to use the tools; digital fluency is the ability to create something new with those tools. Digital fluency can be viewed as an evolving collection of fluencies including, but not limited to, curiosity fluency, communication fluency, creation fluency, data fluency, and innovation fluency.

      This comparison takes a narrow view of digital literacy. Often the term includes the ability to critically evaluate digital content and to create digital media (see e.g. Perspectives of digital literacies. However, the concept of digital fluency is also useful and this definition includes useful elements.

    1. Digital literacy should be positioned as an entitlement for students that supports their full participation in a society in which social, cultural, political, and financial life are increasingly mediated by digital literacies

      Positioning digital literacy as an entitlement is useful language to persuade individual educators and institutions that digital literacy is core to 21st century education, not just an optional add-on.

    1. Designing Social Media for Informal Learning and Knowledge Maturing in the Digital Workplace

      Ravenscroft, A., Schmidt, A., Cook, J., & Bradley, C. (2012). Designing Social Media for Informal Learning and Knowledge Maturing in the Digital Workplace. Journal of Computer Assisted Learning, 28(3), 235–249.

      https://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&AuthType=shib&db=eric&AN=EJ966042&site=eds-live&scope=site&custid=uphoenix

      This paper presents an original approach to designing social media that support informal learning in the digital workplace. It adapts design-based research to take into account the embeddedness of interactions within digitally mediated work-based contexts. The approach is demonstrated through the design, implementation, and evaluation of software tools supporting a particular type of informal learning called "knowledge maturing". The paper: introduces and presents the rationale for, and concept of, knowledge maturing; presents a new design methodology for developing social media that support informal learning and knowledge maturing; focuses on one prototype, for "people tagging for organisational development", that was produced by the methodology (and concisely describes two others); presents the formative evaluation of the highlighted prototype; and finally, discusses the implications and insights arising from this work.

      8/10

    1. omos NOSOTROS, PERSONAS dotadas de RAZÓN, quienes tenemos que repensar y res-tringir radicalmente el capitalismo destructivo, y también nuestra ilimitada y destructiva movilidad, para salvarnos a nosotros, para salvar el clima y nuestro bello planeta

      Como personas dotadas de razón debemos de analizar seriamente las implicaciones de permitir un tipo de "panóptico digital", aún más si se pretende utilizar con fines de gobernanza. El capitalismo se ha acentuado y ha mostrado su efectividad para lograr dar accesibilidad mundial a recursos, productos y/o servicios. La mal llamada soberanía , sólo por ser ejercida por el soberano, ha de ser cuestionada y hemos de analizar más allá del modelo económico político a los actores implicados y si realmente han sido fieles a los principios proclamados, tanto en aquellos modelos capitalistas como en aquellos con tendencia comunista. Dejemos de atacar al capitalismo como un ente perverso, los gobernantes pueden ser perversos, los modelos pueden ser mal aplicados. "Seguridad digital", "capitalismo", "liberalismo", "esfera privada", todos éstos términos se ven reducidos a la manera en la que se implementan.

    1. The second article is from Tom Critchlow titled Building a Digital Garden. What I really like about Tom's piece is his discussion of the idea of "non-performative blogging" in your personal space on the web.I love this idea. Instead of "content marketing" we can use our websites to get back to what made the web awesome while also creating better resources for ourselves and our users.

      There's a nice kernel of an idea here that one's website should be built and made (useful) for ones self first and only secondarily for others. This is what makes it a "personal" website.

    1. Personal websites can be so much more than a progression of posts over time, newer posts showing up while everything from the past is neatly tucked on “page 2” and beyond.

      This is an interesting idea and too many CMSes are missing this sort of UI baked into them as a core idea. CMSes could do a better job of doing both: the garden AND the stream

    2. While I lament the loss of some of the artistry of the early web and lay much of the blame at the feet of blogging platforms like WordPress, such platforms also opened the web to far more people who would not have otherwise been able to create a website. Democratizing publishing is a far loftier goal than dropping animated GIFs across personal spaces.

      WordPress has done a lot to democratize publishing and make portions of it easier, but has it gone too far in crystalizing the form of things by not having more wiki-like or curation-based features?

    3. Throughout the platform’s history, end-users have remained at the mercy of their WordPress theme. Most themes are built around what WordPress allows out of the box. They follow a similar formula. Some may have a fancy homepage or other custom page templates. But, on the whole, themes have been primarily built around the idea of a blog. Such themes do not give the user true control over where to place things on their website. While some developers have attempted solutions to this, most have never met the towering goal of putting the power of HTML and CSS into the hands of users through a visual interface. This lack of tools has given rise to page builders and the block editor.

      an apropos criticsm

    1. This principle requires us to expand our definition of “publication” beyond the usual narrow sense. Few people will ever publish their work in an academic journal or even on a blog. But everything that we write down and share with someone else counts: notes we share with a friend, homework we submit to a professor, emails we write to our colleagues, and presentations we deliver to clients all count as knowledge made public.

      This idea underlies the reason why one might want to have a public online commonplace book or digital garden.

    1. being able to follow links to “follow a conversation” that is threaded on Twitter.

      This is one of my favorite parts about my website and others supporting Webmention: the conversation is aggregated onto or more closely adjacent to the source. This helps prevent context collapse.

      Has anyone made a browser tool for encouraging lateral reading? I'd love a bookmarklet that I could click to provide some highly relevant lateral reading resources for any particular page I'm on.

    1. Creative Commons Attribution NonCommercial

      I'm gearing up my reading list for the holidays. I wanted to add An Urgency of Teachers: the Work of Critical Digital Pedagogy by Jesse Stommel and Sean Michael Morris. Seemingly I can only find .html, .azw3, and .pdf copies of the book, and I'd far prefer an .epub version. Fortunately the book has a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International license (CC BY-NC 4.0), so I've spent some time this morning to convert an original and made myself an .epub version for my Android devices.

      I'm happy to share it if others are looking for the same and don't have the ability (or frankly the time) to make the conversion. I also have a .mobi version (for Kindle) of the text as well since it didn't require much additional work. These are exact replicas with no changes and come with the same CC BY-NC 4.0 license. If Jesse or Sean want copies to make available on their site, I'm happy to send them along. 

      If you have the means, please be sure to make a donation to help support the book and Sean and Jesse's work.

      Originally posted at https://boffosocko.com/2019/12/19/alternate-formats-of-an-urgency-of-teachers-by-jesse-stommel-and-sean-michael-morris/

    1. “INFORMATION RULES”—published in 1999 but still one of the best books on digital economics—Carl Shapiro and Hal Varian, two economists, popularised the term “network effects”,

      I want to get a copy of this book.

    1. This is my digital garden, so you might something you didn’t expect from time to time.

      an example

    1. I love the general idea of where he's going here and definitively want something exactly like this.

      The closest thing I've been able to find in near-finished form is having a public TiddlyWiki with some IndieWeb features. Naturally there's a lot I would change, but for the near term a mixture of a blog and a wiki is what more of us need.

      I love the recontextualization of the swale that he proposes here to fit into the extended metaphor of the garden and the stream.

    1. In the past, I have written and talked about the need to create one canonical URL (address) for yourself online. The need to connect the dots to link together these disparate parts of your digital identity. I’ve been wondering over the last year or so whether that guidance was misguided.

      Ian, I am interested in your point about the 'canonical' link? Is your concern that it is a good ideal, but not realistic to expect of all people?

  9. Sep 2020
    1. Curation comes before a chronological list. The chronological list is still there, but when you click "all articles" instead of numbered pages, all of the articles on that page are visible. If I had thousands of posts that might be a problem, but with my fairly small catalog the pages loads fast and you can scroll through it easily.