721 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
  2. Mar 2020
    1. Something else that will never change is the right to freely self-host Matomo On-Premise; this way you can always host Matomo Analytics on your own servers without having to pay for it.
    1. The digital divide is real, and in the coming months, those without internet access or devices that can run newer software will be shut out of many of the digital communities we’re building to support one another.
    1. GDPR introduces a list of data subjects’ rights that should be obeyed by both data processors and data collectors. The list includes: Right of access by the data subject (Section 2, Article 15). Right to rectification (Section 3, Art 16). Right to object to processing (Section 4, Art 21). Right to erasure, also known as ‘right to be forgotten’ (Section 3, Art 17). Right to restrict processing (Section 3, Art 18). Right to data portability (Section 3, Art 20).
    1. Resources for Closing the Digital Divide

      This website hosts numerous resources to aid educators in their attempt to close the digital divide that alienates a certain socio-economic demographic of students and limits their ability to succeed in school. The website first lists hyperlinked articles to help educators understand the state of the digital divide, then lists hyperlinked articles and resources to help take action to improve the digital divide and close digital learning gaps before supplying links to articles and resources that can help instructors develop media and digital literacy within their respective classrooms. This would be an incredibly helpful website for any instructor who is looking for background information on and resources by which to close the digital divide. Rating: 9/10

    1. Right now, if you want to know what data Facebook has about you, you don’t have the right to ask them to give you all of the data they have on you, and the right to know what they’ve done with it. You should have that right. You should have the right to know and have access to your data.
  3. Feb 2020
    1. Do learners seek out texts that consider multiple perspectives and broaden their understanding of the world? Do learners critically analyze a variety of information and ideas from a variety of sources? Do learners choose texts and tools to consume, create, and share ideas that match their need and audience? Do learners create new ideas using knowledge and insights gained? Do learners analyze the credibility of information, authorial intent, and its appropriateness in meeting their needs? Do learners use information and the ideas of others to solve problems and make decisions as informed citizens? Do learners strive to see limitations and overlaps between multiple streams of information? Do learners gain new perspectives because of the texts they interact with? Do learners use tools to deepen understandings, to share ideas, and to build on others’ thinking? Do learners develop new skills strategies to meet the challenge of new texts and tools?

      These are the goals of digital literacy.

    1. The results of the questionnaire indicated that West Town students had greater access to the Internet at home and were required to use the Internet more in school. These results suggest that a separate and independent achievement gap existed for online reading, based on income inequality.

      The achievement gap is multifaceted, so as educators, we need to attack it in more ways. Getting children library cards (internet access) and technology experiences from a younger age can help close this gap, but only if it is in a equitable way.

    1. The rise of big data and social media has resulted in particular transformations of academia. Deborah Lupton (2015) has, in this context, coined the notion of digital soci-ology. She argues that digital sociology consists of (a) professional digital practice so that sociologists employ ‘digital tools as part of sociological practice – to build networks, construct an online profile, publicize and share research and instruct students’ (p. 15); (b) the investigation of the use of digital technology; (c) digital data analysis, which has also been characterized as the rise of digital methods (Rogers, 2013); and (d) critical digital sociology, the fourth aspect of digital sociology. Lupton (2015) defines critical digital sociology as the ‘reflexive analysis of digital technologies informed by social and cul-tural theory’ (p. 16).All forms of social analysis reflect society in complex ways. Critical digital sociology is a particular reflexion of and on digital technologies’ role in society. It is a theoretical approach grounded in critical and Marxist theory that tries to understand capitalism and domination as well as their possible alternatives. But one should note that there is a con-tradiction between critical sociology as digital sociology’s fourth dimension and big data analytics that is part of Lupton’s third dimension of digital sociology.
    2. Jürgen Habermas (1971), we can say that there is a danger that digital positivism advances an ‘absolutism of pure [digital, quantitative] methodology’ (p. 5), forgets about academia’s educational role, falls short of fully understanding ‘the meaning of knowledge’ (p. 69) in the information society at large and is an ‘immunization of the [Internet] sciences against philosophy’ (p. 67).
  4. Jan 2020
    1. xor

      ⊕ is the symbol for xor

      xor is true when one of the two inputs is exclusively 1.

      ie:

      1 ⊕ 0 = 1 0 ⊕ 1 = 1 1 ⊕ 1 = 0

    1. The Time Is Now: Digital Transformation in B2B Platforms

      The world is going digital, its time to take your business online to survive. The best way to survive here is by building a flexible B2B technology platform that can handle future changes. Here, I will take you to some of the critical points and trends that will help you with digital transformation.

    1. "It's not interactive, ... there's one screen, and you just have to read it," he explained. "It's the same as reading a [paper] page."

      sometimes tech isn't much of an improvement >> we need to channel to the special abilities of growing tech -hashtags, hyperlinks, interactive games and level checks, etc.

    2. That makes digital writing a potentially powerful lever for social good, allowing students to "actively participate in civic society and contribute to a vibrant, informed, and engaged community," as the ALA notes. It also makes digital writing a potentially dangerous tool—decisions about when and what to share online can have repercussions for a student's safety, privacy, and reputation.

      I love how digital literacy allows so many to have access to so much and to communicate easily with others. But there is a definite dark side to sharing in any digital format and many don't think about that.

  5. Dec 2019
    1. ya sea permitiendo publicidad en las bibliotecas, o colaborando con Microsoft

      Esto tiene una vuelta de tuerca. Al final los impulsos de Microsoft en bibliotecas terminaron en manos de IFLA pero eso no quiere decir que el desarrollo de habilidades en el uso de tecnologías haya quedado enfocado en las herramientas de esta empresa y ahora la suit de Google frente a otras alternativas al margen de estas corporaciones. Un mejor servicio o una tecnología fácil de usar se entiende como un don por el que nadie luchó para obtenerlo ¿entonces qué es lo que ha costado y cómo se ha pagado? ignorar el entendimiento de algunas tecnologías es ignorar la manera que tenemos para pensar y hacer desde una perspectiva de ciudadanía digital ¿cómo se puede ejercer los derechos en el siglo XXI si la única ruta que se conoce es la que muestran las corporaciones?

    1. Creative Commons Attribution NonCommercial

      I'm gearing up my reading list for the holidays. I wanted to add An Urgency of Teachers: the Work of Critical Digital Pedagogy by Jesse Stommel and Sean Michael Morris. Seemingly I can only find .html, .azw3, and .pdf copies of the book, and I'd far prefer an .epub version. Fortunately the book has a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International license (CC BY-NC 4.0), so I've spent some time this morning to convert an original and made myself an .epub version for my Android devices.

      I'm happy to share it if others are looking for the same and don't have the ability (or frankly the time) to make the conversion. I also have a .mobi version (for Kindle) of the text as well since it didn't require much additional work. These are exact replicas with no changes and come with the same CC BY-NC 4.0 license. If Jesse or Sean want copies to make available on their site, I'm happy to send them along. 

      If you have the means, please be sure to make a donation to help support the book and Sean and Jesse's work.

      Originally posted at https://boffosocko.com/2019/12/19/alternate-formats-of-an-urgency-of-teachers-by-jesse-stommel-and-sean-michael-morris/

    1. a brief but adequate description for the items in the SDR content management system and on PURL pages associated with the items

      are these the splash pages? What are these PURL pages?

    1. Despite the successful resolution, it was still quite unsettling that a domain name could be transferred to another registrant and sinkholed for some perceived violation. I thought there would be more checks in place to confirm that a perceived violation was real before a domain could be transferred.

      This is highly unsettling. A person, organisation, country, or company should not be able to have a domain name transferred from its rightful owner this easily.

  • Nov 2019
    1. Integrating Technology with Bloom’s Taxonomy

      This article was published by a team member of the ASU Online Instructional Design and New Media (IDNM) team at Arizona State University. This team shares instructional design methods and resources on the TeachOnline site for online learning. "Integrating Technology with Bloom's Taxonomy" describes practices for implementing 6 principles of Bloom's Digital Taxonomy in online learning. These principles include Creating, Evaluating, Analyzing, Applying, Understanding, and Remembering. The purpose of implementing this model is to create more meaningful and effective experiences for online learners. The author guides instructors in the selection of digital tools that drive higher-order thinking, active engagmenent, and relevancy. Rating 9/10

    1. Digital Literacy Initiatives

      This website outlines digital literacy initiatives provided by the Literacy Information and Communication System (LINCS). The U.S. Department of Education, Office of Career, Technical, and Adult Education (OCTAE) implements these intitatives to aid adult learners in the successful use of technology in their education and careers. Students have free access to learning material on different subjects under the "LINCS Learner Center" tab. Teachers and tutors also have access to resoruces on implementing educational technology for professional development and effective instruction. Rating 8/10

    1. Robin outlines the key features of digital storytelling and examines how it facilitates learning in a variety of settings.

    1. The article outlines the value of story-telling in professional development to improve faculty effectiveness. Identifying the problems with current professional development and their lack of efficacy, the authors argue the digital storytelling engages educational professionals, attracting them to online training.

      10/10

    1. The article examines the value of digital storytelling to improve online communities within Army professional forums. In addition to providing a basis for storytelling, the authors examine how storytelling can improve discussions in military training.

      9/10

    1. Rossiter and Garcia evaluate the use of digital storytelling in adult learning classrooms, primarily through the use of "autobiographical learning" where learners share personal experiences and connections with the content. They outline "three key dimensions" that make storytelling valuable in adult learning: voice, creativity, and self-direction.

      10/10

    1. The site provides an explanation of digital storytelling, an outline of the uses in education, and a foundation of web tools to implement digital storytelling as a means of instruction. The 7 elements of digital storytelling serve as a guide for instructors and students.

      10/10

    1. it’s important to embrace pedagogies that leverage synchronous (live) instruction.

      It is mention in this article that Arizona State University is on the right track regarding superior online services. this article point of view is about the online challenges for colleges and universities, such as, doing live videos, online services and supplying tech devices. this website "EdTech" is a online magazine education technology resource for both K-12 and higher education.

  • Oct 2019
    1. ecognize the legitimacy of scholarship produced in new media, whether by individuals or in collaboration, and cre-­ate procedures for evaluating these forms of scholarship

      Also key.

    2. Even more troubling is the state of evaluation for digital scholarship, now an extensively used resource for scholars across the humanities: 40.8% of departments indoctorate-­granting institutions report no experience evaluating refereed articles in electronic format, and 65.7% report no experience evaluating monographs in electronic format.

      This is startling!

    1. He offered the human genome project as an example of how an area of study can be transformed: “Technology hasn’t just made astronomy, biology and physics more efficient. It has let scientists do research they simply couldn’t do before.”

      These advanced have progressed medicine and sciences so far it's incredible. Think of all of the treatments and research data we never would've had without these advancements and technologies. Hundreds of thousands of lives have been saved or qualities of life improved due to technology and it's only going to keep going.

    2. No one person could digest the work’s enormous amount of material, and no single printing could render it accurately, so Mr. Foys created a prize-winning digital version with commentary that scholars could scroll through.

      It is absolutely INSANE that they were able to digitally map a 224 feet long, 11th century tapestry so that scholars could scroll through it and study it. I cannot wrap my brain around this, it's just something I never thought people would do or even could do. This fact has opened my eyes quite a bit.

    3. using powerful technologies and vast stores of digitized materials that previous humanities scholars did not have.

      Libraries will never go out of style, and there is nothing quite like curling up in your favourite cozy spot, be it the beach or a recliner by the fireplace, and escaping into a good book. However, having access to a multitude of peer reviewed research articles at the tips of your fingers makes a world of difference, especially to students. As a working single Mom, having the ability to tuck my kid in at night and sit down to look up resources has made education much more accessible. For young students juggling jobs and school, I am sure this is an invaluable tool as well.

    1. "Digital literacy is the ability to use information and communication technologies to find, evaluate, create, and communicate information, requiring both cognitive and technical skills."

      Definition of digital literacy.

    1. High-Quality Dofollow Backlinks Websites For 2020

      High-quality backlinks are the backlinks from a webpage which has a high PageRank. Some people make a mistake while trying to comment or spam as many websites, blogs which have high PageRank as they can.

    1. No matter how well you design a system, humans will end up surprising you with how they use it. “We make it obvious that it’s a bot, a digital assistant, at the start. But sometimes customers overlook that. And they’ll say, ‘are you a bot? What’s going on here? Transfer me through!’ And they’ll get into it quite strongly,” explains David Grilli, AGL’s chatbot product owner

      Interesting to note response to chatbots

    1. Our monitoring services must use metrics from a network topology level—within a rack, to a cluster, to a datacenter, to a region, to the WAN and the edge—and they must have the capability to zoom in and out.
    2. pulse of the network

      Investigate network pulse in human networks

  • Sep 2019
    1. Dependencia externa:grado en que un formato en particular depende de un hardware o software en específico:el sistema operativo o el software para la presentación o uso y la complejidad de hacer frente a esas dependencias en entornos técnicos futuros

      Esto impacta directamente con el apartado sobre "Fuera del alcance de la estrategia de preservación". No puedes preservar algo si no tienes las garantías para conservar o ejecutar a futuro. Esta barrera debería superarse con una excepción.

    2. mplementación de mecanismos como el cifrado que impiden la conservación de los contenidos mediante un repositorio de confianza

      Las Medidas Tecnológicas de Protección entran en esta categoría.

    3. Las aplicaciones y archivos ejecutables

      La BNC no se responsabiliza por la preservación de aplicaciones creadas en Colombia. Esto es un punto a favor para proyectos como el de Grafoscopio que, por su infraestructura, está pensado para perdurar en un ambiente de programación que posibilita su preservación en el tiempo, Pharo. Sin embargo es un hueco en la memoria de la producción de contenidos digitales del país, la economía naranja en contexto de gobierno (2018-2022) y las defensas de la Dirección Nacional de Derecho de Autor a las industrias creativas (que incluye software en el marco de su protección) pero por las dependencias no hay garantías de preservarlas en el tiempo. Básicamente o los productores de software se hacen un lugar en el mercado o están destinados a perecer en el olvido en la memoria de la nación.

    4. Los conjuntos de datos geoespaciales

      Es interesante que desde la BNC se presenten los datos geoespaciales y se justifiquen como datos que progresivamente están siendo reconocidos por las entidades gubernamentales y aún así, los datos de la RNBP en donde se ubican los puntos de la red en el país, están en Google Maps.

    5. Los conjuntos de datos geoespaciales

      Es interesante que desde la BNC se presenten los datos geoespaciales y se justifiquen como datos que progresivamente están siendo reconocidos por las entidades gubernamentales y aún así, los datos de la RNBP en donde se ubican los puntos de la red en el país, están en Google Maps.

    6. Formato y características del archivo

      Formatos y características de archivos de imagen (Fotografía e imagen vectorial o creada con software de dibujo) y audios.

    7. Factores de calidad y funcionalidad

      Tamaño y resolución sugeridas por la BNC según el tipo de captura que se realice, básica/genérica o profesional. Incluye las dimensiones para la digitalización en escáneres para preservación (5400 x 3800 px.).

    8. Texto realizado en procesador de textos o formatos de publicación de escritorio

      Mención a la preferencia de uso de formatos de procesador de texto libre y basados en XML.

    9. Las decisiones sobre la conservación, el acceso y la preservación de los materiales digitales en la adquisición o fase de creación, se tomarán enforma conjunta por el personal de la Biblioteca directamente involucrado en la gestión de las estrategias de preservación.

      ¿Quién debe estar involucrado en los procesos de preservación? ¿solo la área dedicada a este propósito o debe ser transversal a los flujos de información de la entidad o de los proyectos que se acogen en el marco de la preservación digital?

    10. sus metadatos asociados se desarrollaren de acuerdo con las normas vigentes y las mejores prácticas,

      Se debe confrontar este documento con las prácticas reales de la institución y la línea frente a las recomendaciones de uso de normas y su aplicación desde la institución como un ente rector.

    11. niveles de clasificación de la información como: confidencial, privado, sensibley público.

      La BNC define niveles de acceso a contenidos según los tipos de contenidos y los perfiles de usuario de la biblioteca. Esto, por la sensibilidad de información que podrían contar los documentos en sus colecciones.

    12. Lineamientos de preservación digital de la Biblioteca Nacional de Colombia

    1. There is a growing need to establish literacies around open education, copyright, social media and networked learning as a foundational skill.

      Among both students AND instructors. Instructors teach what they know, and if they do not feel comfortable themselves working in these environments b/c they lack digital skills, then they will not encourage students to work openly.

    1. The learner’s key skills shift away from certainty and towards decision making between various options.

      from certainty to decision making - moving from simplicity to complexity, from knowing what to do to knowing ways to do things

  • Aug 2019
    1. iteracy, which includes the abilities to apply to printed material critical analysis, inference and synthesis;

      How can this encompass digital literacy and non-printed texts; how does being literate change as the world of tech is constantly changing?

    1. The ‘Why’ of MultiliteraciesFirst, why literacy? Or even more fundamentally, why education (in which literacy is a ‘basic’)? On this front, not much has changed in ten years. The two sides of the political spectrum, characterised loosely as ‘left’ and ‘right’, remain poles apart in what they see as the appropriate role of literacy learning in society, and indeed, education in general.

      Well, I think there is a lot has changed since this article (2009) and the question is not "Why?" anymore. The real hard question is "How"? How are we going to keep up with the speed of changing technology and new digital literacies? How can we make sure that every child gets the opportunity to spend ample time on the computer, creating, building, constructing and not only consuming? How can we scaffold teachers so they are skilled and capable of using new digital literacies?

    1. Video Games (Is School Enough? Series)

      I love the idea for my students coding and creating games. I bought a robot to start getting students to code and start engaging in other ideas.

      I love the view the student has on feedback. Knowing what constructive criticism is really helpful is great growth-mindset. Using peers to give constructive criticism is a great way to help students out.

    1. Cultural Anthropologist Mimi Ito on Connected Learning, Children, and Digital Media

      This is a great question and a great start. I think teachers want o do this but do not know how or where to start. The question has been posed and I am sure little by little we will figure out how to do it.

  • Jul 2019
    1. Interpretive Mode

      Good ideas for the World Language Classroom and a good opportunity to teach digital literacy skills, especially reading. Students can look for the information instead of the information just being handed to them.

    1. However, this does not nec-essarily mean they are skilled in the effective use of online information, perhaps the most important aspect of the Internet. Studies show that stu-dents lack critical evaluation skills when reading online (Bennet, Maton, & Kervin, 2008; Forzani & Maykel, 2013; Graham & Metaxas, 2003) and that they are not especially skilled with reading to locate information online (Kuiper & Volman, 2008

      I completely agree with this. They can use the internet but they lack the skills to sift through information in a timely manner that does not make them give up in 10 seconds.

    2. One might even suggest that, over a lifetime, learning how to learn New Literacies is more important than learning a specific literacy of reading or writing.

      This is learning how to learn. When we learn how to learn we can figure out new technologies and we can problem solve

    1. five phases:
      1. students collaborative with instructor to pick area of interest and work on a DQ to guide their research.
      2. students engage in OCI as the do research and use digital tools to make discoveries 3.Students use critical thinking to evaluate online info by analyzing credibility of their info. 4.Students synthesize what they learned/researched by combining info in multiple, multimodal sources.
      3. Students engage in online content construction by putting their research into their own words and choosing the best digital tool/text before sharing their answers.
    2. The Internet Inquiry Project is an online research project that helps students develop the important digital knowledge and skills needed as they build their web literacies.

      IIQ helps students develop and craft web literacy by cultivating web knowledge and skills.

    1. Open learning, also known as open education

      requires a open, sharing, collaborative environment. Promotes pedagogical dialogue. OER have potential to transcend "geographic, economic, or language barriers". Also, OER strengthens digital literacy.

    1. Not teaching digital literacy along with language or other literacy instruction does our students a disservice. Nowadays, applying for a job or even filling in an online form to reserve a picnic table at a local park requires digital literacy skills.

      We must also not assume that others are teaching out students digital literacy. It is everyone's responsibility.

    1. Approachable and accessible to diverse audiences and their needs. The map needs to be written in a language that is easy to understand, and relevant—why do web literacy skills matter to them. Applicable to interest and/or expertise. The map needs to connect to curriculum, credentials, professional development, and other resources to teach people the skills they need to engage online and offline.

      I'm having trouble with what the internet literacy map is. Can anyone define?

    1. Digital literacy is not about the skills of using technologies, but how we use our judgment to maintain awareness of what we are reading and writing, why we are doing it, and whom we are addressing.

      good summary quotation

    1. limited access to the commercialized Internet can also stand in the way of someone’s access to online visual and musical forms and learning about them

      For more on digital redlining, read "Digital Redlining, Access, and Privacy" by Chris Gilliard.

    1. 2016

      Those patches eventually shipped in October 2016

    2. Kickstarter patches

      Patches The languishing Kickstarter backers’ patches are the first four pictured above. The fifth is from the Axanar Indiegogo and the Starfleet Disaster Response was available for Axanar’s “special events.”

    3. June 19, 2019

      Broken Promise<br> Axanar producer Alec Peters announced in February 2019 that Ares Digital was almost done and ready for beta testing, and that he fully expected to launch by the end of February. That didn't happen.

    4. entirely new registration and log-in system

      Contradiction<br> This news in June 2019 is at odds with the "finished updates" announced in February 2019.

    5. Donor Dashboard

      Funding Axanar<br> Ares Digital 3.0 is critical for Alec Peters' effort to raise at least $200,000 to produce the long-promised Axanar short films.

      Barred from public crowdfunding by the settlement in Star Trek’s copyright lawsuit against Axanar, Peters is depending on Ares Digital to raise the quarter-million dollars he estimates Axanar will cost.

    6. Indiegogo patches

      Indiegogo donors have been waiting since 2015 for the patches promised as perks.

      Here are the prototypes for those patches.

    7. your perks

      Axanar has had trouble fulfilling perks still owed to donors in three separate crowdfunding campaigns since 2015.

    8. Funding Axanar Ares Digital 3.0 is critical for Alec Peters' effort to raise at least $200,000 to produce the long-promised Axanar short films.

      Barred from public crowdfunding by the settlement in Star Trek’s copyright lawsuit against Axanar, Peters is depending on Ares Digital to raise the quarter-million dollars he estimates Axanar will cost.

    9. Ares Digital

      This blog post pertains to version 3.0 of Ares Digital, which was unreleased as of 2 July 2019. The system's development, despite the numerical designation, has not been iterative. Each version was essentially created from scratch.

      Former Axanar CTO Terry Mcintosh disputes ownership of Ares Digital as a trademark, and claims to have applied to the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office for registration of the name as a trademark. As of 2 July 2019 the trademark does not appear in the USPTO database.

      The original Ares Digital, never fully completed, was created by McIntosh. Version 2.0 was coded by Bill Watters, who has since resigned as CTO. Version 3.0 was created in his spare time by developer Jerry Ablan.

  • Jun 2019
    1. Simply put, a digital footprint is the record or trail left by the things you do online. Your social media activity, the info on your personal website, your browsing history, your online subscriptions, any photo galleries and videos you’ve uploaded — essentially, anything on the Internet with your name on it.
  • educatorinnovator.org educatorinnovator.org
    1. the possibility and opportunities of using the connected learning framework in school settings

      I appreciate challenging the notion that "official" CL can only occur "across contexts and settings" rather than solely in a school. For me, a related issue is who can access these different contexts and settings. Digital redlining blocks or slows access for many students (and teachers), and I'd like to learn more about how CL addresses digital redlining.

  • May 2019
    1. 1RWDOOPRYLHVKDYHWREHGRFXPHQWDULHVDQGQRWDOOYLVXDOL]DWLRQKDVWREHWUDGLWLRQDOFKDUWVDQGJUDSKV

      This is an interesting fact, usually when I think of visualization and data I go to the classic default charts and data. I'll have to keep this iin mind.

    2. 7KHEDVHRIWKHJUDSKLFLVVLPSO\DOLQHFKDUW+RZHYHUGHVLJQHOHPHQWVKHOSWHOOWKHVWRU\EHWWHU/DEHOLQJDQGSRLQWHUVSURYLGHFRQWH[WDQGKHOS\RXVHHZK\WKHGDWDLVLQWHUHVWLQJDQGOLQHZLGWKDQGFRORUGLUHFW\RXUH\HVWRZKDW¶VLPSRUWDQW

      I really like this because I don't see it often and it actually does draw my eye to the data and capture my interest.

    1. Problematicrepresentationsandbiasesinclassificationsarenotnew

      Not only are these representations nothing new to our society but they probably never will be old. Opinions and representation are not only situational, those with voices and power will use that to their advantage, whether or not it will land us with other algorithms and stereotypes.

    2. nreality,informationmonopoliessuchasGooglehavetheabilitytoprioritizewebsearchresultsonthebasisofavarietyoftopics,suchaspromotingtheirownbusinessinterestsoverthoseofcompetitorsorsmallercompaniesthatarelessprofitableadvertisingclientsthanlargermultinationalcorporationsare.

      It's a good thing google was exposed to the issues at hand and took action. As several other people have already mentioned in their annotations google has seen and responded to the racist algorithms and improved the search results drastically. This will teach youth much better examples of equality and power.

    3. Figure1.7.GoogleImagesresultswhensearchingtheconcept“beautiful”(didnotincludetheword“women”),December4,2014

      You can even see that the pictures for "beautiful men" were images of young, Caucasian males with chiseled, "imperfect" bodies. When did people decide that other cultures, shapes, and ethnicities weren't beautiful? It's a tragedy that we're recovering from globally and that will have tainted the visions of beauty for many people.

    4. Whileservingasanimportantanddisturbingcritiqueofsexistattitudes,thecampaignfailstoimplicatethealgorithmsorsearchenginesthatdrivecertainresultstothetop.Thischaptermovesthelensontothesearcharchitectureitselfinordertoshedlightonthemanyfactorsthatkeepsexistandracistideasonthefirstpage.

      I think that this is incredibly important because while in the past years these campaigns and societal viewpoints have changed and come so far, for the better, there is still the ugly truth that there are and have been these algorithms and thoughts in the past that people were so unaware of. Many people, even people who may be very aware of what's happening in the world, need to be reminded and educated on these issues. Myself included, of course.

    1. humanities scholars have collaborated with computer scientists to build tools to facilitate these essential functions of the humanities in new ways.

      I believe that the collaboration between subjects is necessary to understand ideas and theories in a more holistic way. To successfully write a scientific journal on a new medical accomplishment one must understand how to use language, grammar, and vocabulary. To paint a world renowned artwork masterpiece, one must understand the mathematics of symmetry, spacing, and measurements. It seems only natural to me that the humanities partner with all disciplines to convey its topics and research, and computer science is one such discipline that makes the humanities more applicable and accessible by researchers and public alike.

    2. Image processing involves taking a two-dimensional image that has been con-verted into digital format, making enhancements such as sharpening, changing color balances, saturation and exposure, cropping or straight-ening; annotating by adding metadata for location, date, content and so forth; and setting parameters such as color mode, compression format and size.

      This has recovered so many almost unrecognizable images from the past it's amazing. All these old, damaged documents that have been digitally revitalized is so wonderful, considering all the information we have obtained from said articles and photos.

    3. To be useful, once data is gathered, it must be inspected, cleaned, transformed and modeled to discover useful information, arrive at conclusions and support decision making.

      and presented in an organized manner so we can actually follow it!

    4. More sophisticated tools can per-form high-end linguistic 'analysis, such as tagging parts of speech (POS), creating concordances, collating versions, analyzing sentiments and keyword density/prominence, visualizing patterns, exploring intertex-tual parallels and modeling topics

      I like how this method is relatable because the analysis is what we've been familiar with through high school and university. For example in Literary Studies we learnt how to dissect poetry and pieces of literature. With the text analysis we can use the tactics we're already familiar with.

    5. Searching(including VJSual Searching): Most users are familiar with search engines like Goggle and Yahoo,

      Google Scholar is a students best friend.

    6. Video and Audio Processing Tools: These control the alteration of digital acoustic and video files and can include enhancement, clean-ing, mixing and cutting, annotation and compression.

      Anyone who has bee to a live concert after listening to the same songs on a cd or itunes can appreciate audio processing tools, as some artists sound far different without some digital "tweaking". The same goes for video, editing tools can create a entirely different product than the one shot live.

    7. digital text annotation is simply adding notes or glosses to a document, for instance, putting sticky-note comments on a PDF file for personal use.

      A more environmentally friendly way to make notes and organize thoughts, rather that printing off 80 pages of print, times 50 students, to preform comparative analysis on.

    8. The tools that have been developed since that time have helped scholars to collect material, encode it, study it with text mining and data analysis, map it using anything from Google Maps to geographic information systems (GIS), visualize it-sometimes using video, 3D or virtual reality recreations -create digital archives, incor-porate and analyze sound -anything from speech to music to noise

      The sheer depth to which we are now able to study particular things with these tools is mind-boggling. Instead of being satisfied with your local library or towns collective Library resources, you can search for information across the globe, while not leaving your home. To be able to share and collaborate and display your work in an online forum is equally as amazing, considering how quickly this has come about.

    9. This process creates a three-dimensional solid object based on computer-generated models

      This allows researchers and students to manipulate objects in their hands and explore different textures on the surface that 3D modeling just does not offer. It most definitely was a great invention!

    10. Their effectiveness for reading manuscript books has evolved greatly over the past decade, but they still require much direct intervention or "instruction" on the part of a researcher or other investigator.

      I wonder what can be done to help increase the effectiveness of these apps? Handwritten letters can be hard to read depending on the persons neatness, maybe a larger database with a wider range of handwriting samples could be used to increase the independence of the app?

    11. digital text annotation is simply adding notes or glosses to a document, for instance, putting sticky-note comments on a PDF file for personal use.

      This really does help determine where your thoughts come from while writing a paper so that credit can be given where it is due to help minimize plagiarism.

    1. A searchable map of the addresses contained in the 1956 Negro Travelers’ Green Book, which the user can filter by state or establishment type.

      As someone interested in geography and history, this application of the digital humanities is particularly intriguing. While I still do not fully grasp everything that digital humanities is and aims to do, I appreciate that the platform it gives can reach a far wider audience, myself included. There are so many things I would never have had the privilege of viewing if not for people participating in this discipline.

    2. Many  students tell me that in order to get started with digital humanities, they’d like to have some idea of what they might do and what technical skills they might need in order to do it.

      This is definitely me. I had no idea what to expect from digital humanities and still don't. I'm enjoying learning as we go and these articles definitely help.

    3. An essay, accompanied by photographs, video, and sound, that can be reconfigured by the viewer to be read in multiple ways.

      I really enjoy this layout for a project because not only is it easy to understand and navigate but it incorporates all of this generation's favourite medias; photo, video, sound, and text.

    1. how would our education system change to take advantage of this new external symbol-manipulation capability of students and teachers (and administrators)?

      Let's say it's been twenty years since PDAs have been widely available. I returned to higher education less than ten years ago. K-12 seems to have embraced learning technologies, and their affordances, to improve primary and secondary education. In my experience, few educators with terminal degrees have made the effort while younger and more precarious teachers are slowly adopting educational technologies. Administrators are leading the way with their digital management systems and students are using proprietary social media platforms. Our institutions are doing what they were designed to do: resist change and reproduce the social order. Research paid for with public monies is as quickly privatized as that produced in corporations. Open education practices are just beginning to be explored.

      The first PDA, the Organizer, was released in 1984 by Psion, followed by Psion's Series 3, in 1991. The latter began to resemble the more familiar PDA style, including a full keyboard.[4][5] The term PDA was first used on January 7, 1992 by Apple Computer CEO John Sculley at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas, Nevada, referring to the Apple Newton.[6] In 1994, IBM introduced the first PDA with full telephone functionality, the IBM Simon, which can also be considered the first smartphone. Then in 1996, Nokia introduced a PDA with telephone functionality, the 9000 Communicator, which became the world's best-selling PDA. Another early entrant in this market was Palm, with a line of PDA products which began in March 1996. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Personal_digital_assistant

    1. Humanities scholars can also use a project site to publicize what I call their intellectual bank.

      Sharing research on a digital platform creates the ability to reach many more people. A Ted talk, for example, can be viewed live by say, a couple thousand people; throw it up on the world wide web and your audience just grew exponentially.

    2. but it’s much easier than you think

      I beg to differ. I am currently taking three courses, a psych and a geography in addition to this one. I have spent the most time on this one, with the least results. However, that just means the rewards will be greater when I figure it all out, right? As well, everything I learn in this course could be applied to many other subjects, which is an exciting prospect. I found the black on grey extremely hard to read, something I will keep in mind when creating my own blog.

    3. One thing humanities scholars are really great at doing is reading, connecting ideas and writing about it. We know stuff! However, that work (and it is intellectual labor) is invisible and largely undervalued.  Yet it forms the foundation of all good scholarship. All people see is the footnote on an article or a note in a chapter in a book. Humanities faculty, unlike their STEM counterparts, do not have labs. We do not have a place for our work and no one sees our process. While there are bibliographic managers that help scholars manage their sources, actually writing about the things you read and how they speak to each other in a way that people can access makes it more likely that humanities scholars will have conversations with others who share your research interests.

      Sharing research encourages communication and the development of ideas and theories which is what research is all about so blog spaces and web spaces are a great way to achieve this successfully and across the web.

    1. using powerful technologies and vast stores of digitized materials that previous humanities scholars did not have.

      Libraries will never go out of style, and there is nothing quite like curling up in your favourite cozy spot, be it the beach or a recliner by the fireplace, and escaping into a good book. However, having access to a multitude of peer reviewed research articles at the tips of your fingers makes a world of difference, especially to students. As a working single Mom, having the ability to tuck my kid in at night and sit down to look up resources has made education much more accessible. For young students juggling jobs and school, I am sure this is an invaluable tool as well.

    2. No one person could digest the work’s enormous amount of material, and no single printing could render it accurately, so Mr. Foys created a prize-winning digital version with commentary that scholars could scroll through.

      It is absolutely INSANE that they were able to digitally map a 224 feet long, 11th century tapestry so that scholars could scroll through it and study it. I cannot wrap my brain around this, it's just something I never thought people would do or even could do. This fact has opened my eyes quite a bit.

    3. He offered the human genome project as an example of how an area of study can be transformed: “Technology hasn’t just made astronomy, biology and physics more efficient. It has let scientists do research they simply couldn’t do before.”

      These advanced have progressed medicine and sciences so far it's incredible. Think of all of the treatments and research data we never would've had without these advancements and technologies. Hundreds of thousands of lives have been saved or qualities of life improved due to technology and it's only going to keep going.

    1. At the ICCH conference in Columbia, South Carolina, in spring 1987 a group of people mostly working in support roles in humanities computing got together and agreed that they needed to find a way of keeping in touch on a regular basis.

      To think that we use online chats so casually, with family, friends and colleagues from all over the world, and it was only thirty short years ago that the first "electronic seminar" was introduced.

    2. Now that the Internet is such a dominant feature of everyday life, the opportunity exists for humanities computing to reach out much further than has hitherto been possible.

      I was just finishing high school when the internet became mainstream. In the following twenty-three years, we have seen an explosion of new developments as well as greater access to technology that is still relatively new. The implications for how knowledge can be shared and expanded upon is incredible.

    3. The TEI's adoption as a model in digital library projects raised some interesting issues about the whole philosophy of the TEI, which had been designed mostly by scholars who wanted to be as flexible as possible. Any TEI tag can be redefined and tags can be added where appropriate

      Question - What were some of the issues that arose with the TEI's adoption as a model in digital library projects?

      The ability to add tags where needed throughout the texts seems to be a positive aspect due to the added ease of searching key words and it being included in said search.

    4. An additional dimension was added to humanities electronic resources in the early 1990s, when it became possible to provide multimedia information in the form of images, audio, and video.

      This addition to the media made internet education and research even more advanced and helpful. And it also added a whole new level to entertainment that is very wonderful!

    5. At this time much attention was paid to the limitations of the technology. Data to be analyzed were either texts or numbers. They were input laboriously by hand either on punched cards, with each card holding up to eighty characters or one line of text (uppercase letters only), or on paper tape, where lower-case letters were perhaps possible but which could not be read in any way at all by a human being. Father Busa has stories of truckloads of punched cards being transported from one center to another in Italy. All computing was carried out as batch processing, where the user could not see the results at all until printout appeared when the job had run. Character-set representation was soon recognized as a substantial problem and one that has only just begun to be solved now with the advent of Unicode, although not for every kind of humanities material. Various methods were devised to represent upper- and lower-case letters on punched cards, most often by inserting an asterisk or similar character before a true upper-case letter. Accents and other non-standard characters had to be treated in a similar way and non-Roman alphabets were represented entirely in transliteration.

      I find it very interesting how materials made by human beings were put into a machine and rendered virtually unintelligible until man came through again by creating a code. It's fascinating to read how much work "creating the internet" was and it makes me very appreciative that I wasn't the one who had to do it.

      • 0:37 - need to recognize the networked nature of today's media
      • 0:37 - need to recognize the networked nature of today's media
      • 0:48 - work within traditional media literacy and build on things that have worked for decades, but recognize what has changed and use the strengths of networked media
      • 1:05 - how do children check sources on the internet
      • 1:20 - one of the simplest ways is to follow the links back to the source
      • 1:34 - when it's a photo, you can do a reverse image search
      • 1:50 can do a news search and sort by date to see if the news story is current
      • 2:45 - misinformation campaigns happening - mixing genuine content with misinformation
      • 3:25 - some create alternate identities or fake accounts
      • 4:25 - important to get a sense of how reliable a source is
      • 4:35 - what is the purpose of the source and what is their business model? - is there accuracy and reliability in this, then likely will trust it as a source
      • 5:10 - impact that we don't get our news from a limited number of sources
      • 5:45 - some of these sources are from friends on social media, others are algorithmically determined
      • 6:08 - some advantages and disadvantages - the old model was news curated in a newspaper; new model has the potential of getting news we may not have gotten in the old model
      • 6:20 but in the old system you had gatekeeping and 'provenance'; in online news it's sometimes an effort to see where the information originates; gate keeping falls to us now
      • 7:05 we need to train young people to do this
      • 7:30 how should we teach this?
      • 7:35 - with the concept approach you don't need to feel like an expert
      • 7:40 - success teaching media literacy from the key concepts for three decades; begin from these
      • 7:52 - media are constructed;
      • 7:55 - they have commercial considerations;
      • 7:58 they have social and political implications;
      • 8:00 that audiences negotiate meaning;
      • 8:05 that each medium has a unique form and the form influences the content
      • 8:20 these can be applied to any form of media and adapted to any grade from K-12
      • 8:30 so the key concepts of digital literacy are paralleled and are in addition to those, they don't replace the original five concepts
      • 8:40 now have implications of digital literacies in that they are networked so we need to understand the idea of the network
      • 8:50 understand that content now is shareable, that this is the default rather than the exception
      • 8:55 - the ways the tools we use influence not just the content but the ways we use them
      • 9:05 - this has an impact, an ethical dimension
      • 9:10 - these can be applied in any context and to any grade level
      • 9:20 - we have a full digital literacy curriculum that we offer (speaking about Media Smarts Canada); it has lessons on seven different aspects that a teacher or school board can use
      • 9:45 - the value of the key concepts is teachers can modify these resources to their contexts
      • 9:50 - teachers have in those key concepts what is essentially a GUIDING STAR to understand what they are supposed to be achieving with these lessons
    1. Importance Of Blogging For Your Business

      Are you running a small business and not launched a blog for your business yet? Read this post to understand the Importance Of Blogging For Your Business. Visit us at: Samaj Infotech