10 Matching Annotations
  1. Oct 2018
    1. These findings reflect a broader discussion about the digital divide’s impact on America’s youth. Numerous policymakers and advocates have expressed concern that students with less access to certain technologies may fall behind their more digitally connected peers. There is some evidence that teens who have access to a home computer are more likely to graduate from high school when compared with those who don’t.
    2. Lastly, 35% of teens say they often or sometimes have to do their homework on their cellphone. Although it is not uncommon for young people in all circumstances to complete assignments in this way, it is especially prevalent among lower-income teens. Indeed, 45% of teens who live in households earning less than $30,000 a year say they at least sometimes rely on their cellphone to finish their homework.
    3. This is even more common among black teens. One-quarter of black teens say they are at least sometimes unable to complete their homework due to a lack of digital access, including 13% who say this happens to them often. Just 4% of white teens and 6% of Hispanic teens say this often happens to them. (There were not enough Asian respondents in this survey sample to be broken out into a separate analysis.)
    4. This aspect of the digital divide – often referred to as the “homework gap” – can be an academic burden for teens who lack access to digital technologies at home. Black teens, as well as those from lower-income households, are especially likely to face these school-related challenges as a result, according to the new Center survey of 743 U.S. teens ages 13 to 17 conducted March 7–April 10, 2018.
    5. Some 15% of U.S. households with school-age children do not have a high-speed internet connection at home, according to a new Pew Research Center analysis of 2015 U.S. Census Bureau data. New survey findings from the Center also show that some teens are more likely to face digital hurdles when trying to complete their homework.
  2. Jul 2018
    1. teachers of low income students tended to report more obstacles to using educational technology effectively than their peers in more affluent schools.

      increasing the availability and instruction of technology in lower income schools can help bridge this gap

    2. Smart phones have helped bridge the divide, as they provide internet access to populations previously at a digital disadvantage.

      There is hope for the future- with technology becoming increasingly advanced and the "new" that becomes old becomes more accessible and available, people are able to learn more. (simply because they have access to the web)

    1. Think, for example, about the schools who block YouTube and a bunch of other great tools for learning and expression — so youth maybe have access to a computer and internet, but half of it’s blocked from them.

      I feel like this point is novel and not as well understood as it could be. That part of digital literacy is about helping schools / educators make smarter (difficult) choices about how to protect kids from the "bad" stuff without unneccesarily blocking them from the good stuff.

  3. Mar 2016
    1. “We see kids in their cars in the parking lot at night and on weekends,” says Buddy Berry, superintendent of Eminence Independent Schools. They’re there, he says, because they can access the Internet using the school’s wireless network—something many don’t have at home.
  4. Jul 2015