25 Matching Annotations
  1. Mar 2020
    1. Resources for Closing the Digital Divide

      This website hosts numerous resources to aid educators in their attempt to close the digital divide that alienates a certain socio-economic demographic of students and limits their ability to succeed in school. The website first lists hyperlinked articles to help educators understand the state of the digital divide, then lists hyperlinked articles and resources to help take action to improve the digital divide and close digital learning gaps before supplying links to articles and resources that can help instructors develop media and digital literacy within their respective classrooms. This would be an incredibly helpful website for any instructor who is looking for background information on and resources by which to close the digital divide. Rating: 9/10

    1. Emerging Theories of Learning and the Role of Technology

      This article discusses the social changes introduced by new technologies and how educational environments are trying to prepare students to enter a technologically advanced workforce through integration of technology with curriculum. The author challenges traditional theories of learning by discussing how cognition is situated in the digital, 21st-century learner, and that technology integration should focus on the importance of community within learning environments. Although the article challenges the traditional ideas of technology integration, it fails to provide actionable ways in which educators could infuse technology into their own curriculum. Rating: 6/10

    1. Technology Integration: Connections to Educational Theories

      This article, written by five instructors at the Ohio State University at Mansfield (OSU-M), explores the ways in which OSU-M has integrated technology into their curriculum as well as the pedagogical reasons behind the integration. The article begins with a background introduction into the campus of OSU-M and its student population before explaining the required technology courses students in their teacher education program experience based on ISTE standards. Next, the article outlines six criteria the university used to develop its technology curriculum and discusses their use of developmentally appropriate practice, integrated curriculum, literature-based instruction, classroom-based inquiry, and diversity and equity. This article could serve as a practical, although dated, model by which adult educators could begin to construct a method of integrating technology into their curriculum. Ranking: 4/10

    1. At the Intersection of Technology and Pedagogy: considering styles of learning and teaching

      In this article, Gibson analyzes the use of educational technology through the lens of learning styles of students as well as through learning environments, including those that are teacher-centric and those that are student-centric. The article also discusses the differences between technologies that simply make the work already being done in classes easier to do and those technologies that fundamentally challenge pedagogy to evolve towards a more constructivist ideology.The author further explores external social and political pressures to increase technology integration in the classroom, but warns that not all integration is constructive integration. Although the article discusses many approaches to technology integration, it fails to include concrete steps that educators might take to include technology into their curriculum. Rating: 6/10

    1. Research in Educational Technology

      This textbook, published by the Oklahoma State University Library ePress, contains a chapter which summarizes the main views of knowledge in educational technology research, including postpositivism, constructivism, advocacy, and pragmatism, as well as each view's research traditions. The chapter suggests an approach to evaluating research articles through the lenses of a consistent learning theory coupled, methodologies that support that learning theory, and the conclusions that are drawn by the researchers supported through their methodologies. This chapter would help educators evaluate how and why they might include technology into their course curriculum. Rating: 7/10

    1. Technology Integration in Schools

      This article focuses on the lack of technology integration by K-12 educators into the curriculum itself based on the evaluation of the amount of access to educational technologies by both teachers and students, how often these technologies are used for instructional purposes, and how that technology is used to facilitate learning by students. The article goes on to discuss ways in which access to educational technology has been increased through one-to-one computing initiatives which has produced mixed results and open educational resources which suggests that educators produce learning materials without compensation. Next, the article suggests ways to increase instructional technology use through professional development in which teacher skills are developed using technology, collaborative environments used to increase holistic teacher engagement, and mentoring to improve teachers' attitudes towards technology implementation. Finally, the article discusses ethical issues surrounding technology use including academic dishonesty, accessibility, and ethical use behaviors.The author concludes with a set of needs in order to bring about effective use of educational technology which include pedagogically sound practices, personalized instruction, assessment, and change at the systemic level. This article provides a very well-rounded view of the challenges and affordances that educators face when considering how to integrate technology into their curriculum. Rating: 8/10

    1. Characteristics of Adult Learners With Implications for Online Learning Design

      To view this article, click "Full text." This article first discusses characteristics of adult learners before addressing the ways in which online learning design should be influenced by the adult learning theories of andragogy, self-directed learning, experiential learning, and transformative learning. By comparing the characteristics of adult learners and the ways in which the theories do or do not address those theories, the author suggests ways in which the characteristics of an adult learner should be used to develop a more holistic approach to developing online learning environments. Although the author doesn't include practical application, it is one of the few articles that expresses a need to combine multiple theories into one design approach. Ranking: 6/10

    1. Handbook of Adult and Continuing Education

      Although only a preview of this textbook is available for free, the amount of historical research included is incredible. The chapters cover a diverse range of topics that are still being discussed today and demonstrate the ideological underpinnings of many modern issues. Published in 2000, the conversation about technology integration in adult learning has moved far beyond the scope of this book, but it could certainly serve as an underpinning of many of the issues that are still being discussed and developed upon today. Ranking: 5/10

    1. Integrating Technology into the Classroom: Eight Keys to Success

      To view this article, click "Full text." This article focuses on the author's perspective of the primary concern in technology integration in educational environments - the instructor. The authors discuss the eight barriers that teachers create when trying to integrate technology: fear of change, training, personal use, teaching models, learning theories, educational climate, motivation, and support. Although the advice is practical, it is extremely rudimentary, created eighteen years ago, and does not address the more modern concerns of integration of technology in adult educational environments. Ranking: 3/10

    1. A Paradigm Shift: Technology Integration for Higher Education in the New Millennium

      To view this article, click "full text." The article discusses a paradigm shift for educational technology at a time when distance learning first started growing across the United States. Initially, institutions of higher learning were driven by technology integration standard mandates as well as competition from other institutions, but eventually the shift normalized with federal funding. The author discusses barriers to technology adaptation, focused on teacher training, before describing characteristics of the distance learner and distance teacher. Although the article may have been relevant for its time, twenty years later it serves more as a grounding article for when educational technology first began to take rise, the considerations and limitations that were addressed, and the way that technology integration in classrooms has still not realized the potential envisioned by its early adopters. Rating: 4/10

    1. Integrating Technology in the Adult Education Classroom

      This website offers an online course regarding the purposes, guidelines, and implementation of integrating technology into adult learning environments. Additionally, the course offers examples of ways to integrate that technology. Rank: 7/10

    1. Resources for Technology Integration

      This webpage hosts numerous links to help educators understand the current challenges and successes of technology integration into the educational environment. Additionally, there are resources broken down by grade level and a list of additional resources on the internet for a wide range of general and specialized learning environments.

    1. Resources for Technology Integration

      This webpage offers a wealth of links to understanding current elements of technology integration into various classrooms, links to the Center for Applied Research in Educational Technology, as well as a link to resources for technology integration which provides useful tools that teachers can begin to deploy immediately. Ranking: 9/10

    1. ISTE Standards Transform learning and teaching.  

      This section of the ISTE website offers paid resources that educators can access to improve their own understanding of the ISTE standards as well as practical ways to implement those standards in their classroom integration of technology. Rating: 6/10

  2. Nov 2019
    1. In the text "10 Current and Emerging Trends in Adult Education," ten current trends are briefly reviewed. Among these are the emphasis on effort, growth, and social-emotional learning. In terms of technology, real-life simulations and AI are being used to better prepare learners for their professional encounters and responsibilities. In terms of what is on the horizon for adult learning, one can expect mastery to be emphasized rather than degrees. As a result of the information economy, it is expected that income inequality will grow and thus advocacy for adult learners and continued opportunities for working adults to grow will mitigate the negative consequences. Rating: 7/10

    1. The text "Adult Learners Come to Campus With Unique Technology Needs" illustrates the barriers to learning that surround a learner's experience with technology. Author David Hutchins suggests having inclusive discussions with diverse sets of technology users to best determine their needs, issues, and reasonable solutions for support. Multi-level support for multiple generations of learners includes the instructors, administration, and IT teams that work together to improve education via technology. Embedding links throughout the text re-direct the reader to valuable resources for further review. Rating: 7/10

    1. Section 508 compliance is discussed to support instructors knowledge of section 508 and how to begin the process of ensuring instructional content is 508 compliant. Section 508 of the federal Rehabilitation Act governs access of media to all persons whether they have a disability or not. Including captions, audio description, and accessible video players are vital to compliance. Compliance with 508 is necessary given that data that illustrates the percent of employees that have need for accommodations to support their learning. This brief article seems highly related to Universal Design of Learning. Rating: 10/10

  3. Mar 2019
    1. Edutech wiki This page has a somewhat messy design and does not look very modern but it does offer overviews of many topics related to technologies. Just like wikipedia, it offers a good jumping off point on many topics. Navigation can occur by clicking through categories and drilling down to topics, which is easier for those who already know the topic they are looking for and how it is likely to be characterized. Rating 3/5

    1. This link is for the Association of Information Science and Technology. While many of the resources are available only to those who are association members, there are a great many resources to be found via this site. Among the items available are their newsletter and their journal articles. As the title suggests, there is a technology focus, and also a focus on scientific findings that can guide instructional designers in the presentation and display of visual and textual information, often but not exclusively online. Instructional designers are specifically addressed via the content of this site. A student membership is available. Rating 5/5

  4. Nov 2018
    1. Educational Technology Leadership and Practice in Higher Education: The Emergence of Threshold Concepts

      This article explores how technology has become the new standard for higher education and this new standard has created a need to develop new concepts on how to view a subject. Additionally, methods to use educational technology resources are described. Rating: 5/5

    1. What is the future of technology in education?

      The article explores how technology will grow beyond individual devices and how it will move into the cloud. Cloud computing would allow students and teachers to access course content any time and any place. Rating: 5/5

    1. Here's how technology is shaping the future of education

      This article explains how technology is changing education and offers a few examples of how it has already done so. Rating: 5/5

  5. Oct 2018
    1. A wariness that has been slowly brewing is turning into a regionwide consensus: The benefits of screens as a learning tool are overblown, and the risks for addiction and stunting development seem high.