28 Matching Annotations
  1. Mar 2019
    1. 25 examples of mobile teaching This is a brief page that is cluttered with some irrelevant content that occurs in the form of rather large graphics. It is oriented toward higher education environments though the ideas would be quite easy to implement in other contexts, such as for training adult learners. The text is not in depth enough to be tremendously helpful but this resource does nonetheless make a contribution not made by other resources in that it shows actual teaching techniques. rating 4/5

    1. personalize learning infographic

      This is not quite what it sounds like. It is a Pinterest style page with links to assorted articles that relate to personalized learning, most of which are presented in an infographic. It is sufficiently useful if one has the patience to click through to the infographics. Usability is satisfactory although the top half of the page is taken up with graphics that are not directly related to the content. rating 3/5

    1. just in time teaching This article provides practice strategies by which one can use just in time teaching. This was authored for use in higher education environments but can easily be used in other settings. It appears to have practical use. rating 5/5

    1. mobile learning technologies for 21st century classrooms This undated article discusses mobile learning in classrooms in a nonspecific way. One of the sources is Marc Prensky, whose work has been called into question by multiple authors. The type of information provided by this article seems rather basic and a function of common sense. A few apps are discussed. rating 1/5

    1. Edutech wiki This page has a somewhat messy design and does not look very modern but it does offer overviews of many topics related to technologies. Just like wikipedia, it offers a good jumping off point on many topics. Navigation can occur by clicking through categories and drilling down to topics, which is easier for those who already know the topic they are looking for and how it is likely to be characterized. Rating 3/5

    1. This page offers general guidelines for facilitating class discussions. It is written for college environments and in usable in adult learning and training settings also. The presentation is straightforward but the content is not in depth. Part of the value of the page is links on the left side that address other teaching topics related to course design and course management. Rating 2/2

  2. www.pblworks.org www.pblworks.org
    1. project based learning While project based learning is more frequently used with children than adults, it can be useful for limited-time instruction for adults. This is a user friendly page that provides a decent description of project based learning and also discusses the design elements and teaching practices that should be used. rating 4/5

    1. problem based learning This gives a brief overview of problem based learning. This is a teaching method in which learners receive an ill structured problem that they continue to define and then solve. This web page serves as an overview but if one were teaching with this approach, more information would be needed than is contained on the typical introductory web page. Rating 3/5

    1. This is better than the problem-based learning page I already posted so I will post this one too. it is easy to read and gives the instructional designer or teacher a quick and better-than-average explanation about problem based learning, which is a method of teaching in which learners form teams and learn through solving real problems. rating 4/5

    1. Nine alternatives to lecturing This page briefly describes nine ways to teach other than lecture. Some of these are common, such as case study; others, such as a pro and con grid, are explained less often. This page, like the others I have bookmarked, is oriented toward teaching college students and adults.

    1. This is one of many pages that describes team based learning. The layout and typeface make this page easy enough to read. The content is rather brief and would suffice for someone who is trying to understand this approach and decide whether it is workable for their own adult learning and training context.

  3. Jan 2019
    1. Teaching classes

      This article gives several good tips to teaching for the first time, but each teacher will need to find their own teaching persona, and through trial and error they will learn what works best for them.

    1. grading final papers

      Grading final papers isn't the best time to provide a lot of qualitative feedback because student's aren't likely to read or use it. Formative feedback should be given early in the term.

    1. check in with your students; extend availabilities to meet; offer feedback, and follow up

      These four actions can do a lot to make students feel seen and connected.

    1. Thoughts on bringing current events into your classroom.

      A conversation between a PhD student and a professor of African American studies about how to discuss current events in difficult times.

    1. creating a “humanities lab”,

      I like this idea of creating a lab for problem-based learning in humanities classes. What other STEM-related practices could humanities borrow?

    1. But these tools require we think about their purpose, method, and audience just as carefully as when we design an essay prompt, a problem set, or any other assessment exercise.

      This is an example of when meta-teaching is helpful.

    1. Our discussion made the classroom feel like it was not the professor’s class to run alone, but ours as well.

      What a great example of setting the tone on the first day of class!

    1. Inevitably, what I find reaffirms aspects of writing pedagogy I’m familiar with while giving me fresh ways to express it to the new audiences with whom I’m working.

      Teaching writing in STEM disciplines is beneficial for the students and the teacher.

    1. On bringing lessons from dissertation writing into your classroom.

      What one PhD student learned about teaching from writing his dissertation.

    1. For graduate teaching assistants, this is the time when we introduce ourselves, lay out our expectations, and, hopefully, establish the tone and level of authority that we want to convey throughout the term.

      Good advice for the first day back to school for anyone looking for new ideas.

    1. More forcefully than in any other single class, I realized the importance of universal design for learning (UDL). This curricular design features privilege multiple access points for learning, engagement, and assessment. As Dr. Jennifer Stone puts it, “designing on the front end” with UDL minimizes the need for individual learners to make a special request.

      The incorporation of UDL practices is important for all students.

  4. Nov 2018
    1. Instructional Design Strategies for Intensive Online Courses: An Objectivist-Constructivist Blended Approach

      This was an excellent article Chen (2007) in defining and laying out how a blended learning approach of objectivist and constructivist instructional strategies work well in online instruction and the use of an actual online course as a study example.

      RATING: 4/5 (rating based upon a score system 1 to 5, 1= lowest 5=highest in terms of content, veracity, easiness of use etc.)

    1. Distance Education Trends: Integrating new technologies to foster student interaction and collaboration

      This article explores the interaction of student based learner-centered used of technology tools such as wikis, blogs and podcasts as new and emerging technology tools. With distance learning programs becoming more and more popular, software applications such as Writeboard, InstaCol and Imeem may become less of the software of choice. The article looks closely at the influence of technology and outcomes.

      RATING: 4/5 (rating based upon a score system 1 to 5, 1= lowest 5=highest in terms of content, veracity, easiness of use etc.)

  5. Jun 2016
    1. p. 69

      "In the learning environments of classrooms and schools, students are exposed to and perceive various messages about the purposes of achievment. For example, students can perceive that in their classroom or school, there is an emphasis on learning, understanding, and improvment (a mastery goal structure). Similarly, they can perceive messages that suggest that getting the highest grades on the test and outperforming their classmates are valued most in the classroom or school (a performance goal structure). Sometimes, these perceptions are influenced by teacher practices that emphasize a mastery or performance goal structure, such as when teachers post only the work of the highest achieving students in the class (performance-goal-oriented instructional practices)."