6 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. The cutting edge of informal learning: makers, mobile, and more. This article discusses the features of informal learning and also discuss how it can be 'meaningful' and engaging. Constructivism and constructionism are mentioned though not at length. This may be useful given the limited resources I have but it is not one of the more impressive journal articles I have seen. rating 3/3

  2. Nov 2018
    1. Instructional Design Strategies for Intensive Online Courses: An Objectivist-Constructivist Blended Approach

      This was an excellent article Chen (2007) in defining and laying out how a blended learning approach of objectivist and constructivist instructional strategies work well in online instruction and the use of an actual online course as a study example.

      RATING: 4/5 (rating based upon a score system 1 to 5, 1= lowest 5=highest in terms of content, veracity, easiness of use etc.)

  3. Jul 2016
    1. (Actually, I’m pretty sure the company above meant “constructivism” here, since “constructionism” builds upon the learn-by-doing of constructivism by stressing the importance of the tangible not just the abstract.)

      Useful note. And reminder.

  4. Aug 2015
    1. Hands on

      This might be the most explicit link to constructivism and constructionism. Not only is it about “learn by doing”, but it’s about concrete action in the physical world. Can’t help but find it limiting and restrictive to mention “3D Printing” as the main component. After all, FabLabs got started without 3D printers and the Maker movement has a lot of stuff which has little to do with 3D Printing. But it’s hard to argue that 3D Printing haven’t attracted attention, in the past couple of years. Sexier than laser etching? As Makers often point out, there’s a lot in the movement which is really very similar to what was happening in shop class. Though the trend may sound new, it’s partly based on nostalgia. A neat aspect, though, is that much of it can happen through learners’ projects cutting across class boundaries. Sure, we’ve known about project-based learning for a while. You do a project for a class or a series of classes. But how about a personal pathway (cf. “individualism”, above) through which learners add learning experiences around a central project? Learning Circles can make that into something really neat.

  5. Jan 2015
    1. Kirkham, N. Z. (2009). Altogether now: Learning through multiple sources. In S. P. Johnson (Ed.), Neoconstructivism: The new science of cognitive development. New York: Oxford University Press