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  2. Jun 2021
    1. The basic thing I do with col-34 THE NEW 'I'ORKEI\, APRIL 29. 2013 lege students is pretend that fm their editor and their copy editor.

      Teaching writing...

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    1. Seth Long takes a closer look at the number of memory treatises from 1550-1650 to come up with a more concrete reason for the disappearance of mnemonic imagery (and the method of loci) in English rhetoric and pedagogic traditions. Some writers have attributed it to the rise of more writing and publishing. Long extends Frances Yates' idea of its decline to the rise of Ramism by presenting some general data about the number and quality of memory treatises published during the time period in question. Comparison of this data with European continental publications helps to draw some more concrete conclusions.

      In particular, he highlights an example of a Ramist sympathizer re-writing a previous treatise and specifically removing the rhetorical imagery from the piece.

    2. Butler then moves on toquote—not Cicero, as Wilson does—but Quintilian, who among classical authorities is the mostskeptical about the art of memory’s efficacy (see endnote 4). Echoing Quintilian’s complaint, Butlersays that it is probably more difficult to construct a memory palace than simply to remember thingsby rote (54–55).

      Construction is definitely work. The question about how much it may be should be addressed on a continuum of knowing or understanding particular concepts as well.

      Creating palaces for raw data de-novo, as in a memory championship, takes a lot of practice for speed and the lack of relationships. However in a learning setting, it may be better to read, grasp, and understand material and then create a palace to contain the simple raw facts which might then also bring back other bits of the knowledge and understanding.

      This might be a useful idea to explore further, gather some data, and experiment with.

  3. May 2021
    1. Lynne Kelly describes her experiences with some elementary school students using her rapscallions, songlines, and a woodhenge to memorize their math and social studies classwork and present it to their peers.

    1. The qualitative data collected in this project clearly indicate that this learning approach is pleasurable and productive in itself, and may well have a role in decreasing the ‘drudgery’ often associated with modern higher education.

      This idea has been known historically for centuries. It's only with education "reforms" in the 1500's that things have become markedly worse in Western education.

    2. A fourth theme to emerge from the analysis of the data, is the highly relevant ‘cultural’ aspect to this memorization technique which students greatly appreciated. As one student notes: “I like the idea of connecting Indigenous culture with science learning…”. The theme of culture overlays learning and demonstrates the importance of conceptualising Australian Aboriginal ways of knowing or learning with or from rather than about Australian Aboriginal people and their knowledge systems. As Yunkaporta [2, p. 15] states, it is important not to examine Australian Aboriginal knowledge systems, but to explore the external systems “from an Indigenous knowledge perspective”.

      This is so heartwarming to me.

    3. Further, while the notion of ‘steps’ is often used in education as a way to scaffold knowledge, in the case of the Australian Aboriginal memory technique, there is also literal use of the term ‘steps’ as the following quote highlights: “[w]alking around and looking at the trees was a good visual tool to relate to corresponding steps in the cycle”. Kelly [1, p. 20] concurs and refers to the way Indigenous cultures use geography and landscape to create “memory spaces” and even “narrative landscapes”.

      Steps, diagrams, and other structures have been almost all that is left of potential mnemotechniques following educational reform in the late 1500s.

      Is there any research on these sorts of knowledge scaffolds in modern education?

      A classic example in Western culture can be seen in Eusebius' breaking the Bible down into smaller pieces using verses, though I don't think it was made canonical until during the Renaissance.

    4. Incoming medical students overwhelmingly felt that training on specific memory techniques would be helpful, with 93% indicating ‘strongly agree’ (51/72; 71%) or ‘somewhat agree’ (17/72; 23%) in response to the question: “Specific memory training as a component of medical education would be worth my while”.

      How can something like this that so many people find worthwhile be so neglected by any school, much less a medical school?

      Our educational system is really failing our students.

      Damn you Peter Ramus!

    5. Bloom’s taxonomy is a framework that suggests learners move from lower order thinking such as remembering and understanding, through to higher order thinking skills that include synthesising, evaluating and creating [26].

      This looks somewhat intriguing:

      Krathwohl DR. A Revision of Bloom’s Taxonomy: An Overview. Theory Into Practice. 2002;41(4):212–8. _2. https://doi.org/10.1207/s15430421tip4104 | Google Scholar

    1. As someone who knows both methods and has likely practiced them in reasonable depth, I'm curious what Dr. @LynneKelly thinks. I'd love to see this same study done to include song, dance, painting, etc. to expand the potential effects.

      If nothing else, it's good to see some positive research on the methods which will hopefully draw more attention to the pedagogy and classroom use.

      Dr. Reser said the Monash School of Rural Health is considering incorporating these memory tools into the medical curriculum once teaching returns to a post-COVID normal. “This year we hope to offer this to students as a way to not only facilitate their learning but to reduce the stress associated with a course that requires a lot of rote learning,” he said. —https://scitechdaily.com/ancient-australian-aboriginal-memory-tool-superior-to-memory-palace-learning-technique/

    1. Orbis Pictus, or Orbis Sensualium Pictus (Visible World in Pictures), is a textbook for children written by Czech educator John Amos Comenius and published in 1658. It was the first widely used children's textbook with pictures, published first in Latin and German and later republished in many European languages.

      This would seem to be the sort of ancestor of the bestiary that might be used as a mnemonic tool, but given it's 1658 publication date, it's likely the case that this would have been too late for it to have served this purpose for most (without prior knowledge).

      Apparently the Encyclopaedia Britannica labeled it as “the first children’s picture book.”

  4. Apr 2021
    1. But syllabi, as long as I’ve known them, are too often defensive documents aimed at controlling students through absurd levels of bureaucracy.

      This is certainly an apt definition of syllabi

    1. 7:09 - Discussion of a custom template for use cases; this sounds a bit like some customization similar to Open Scholar on Drupal

      Here's a link to Alan Levine's work here: https://cogdogblog.com/category/twu-portfolios/

      What has support for WPMU looked like within the pandemic?

      Laurie Miles, UNC Asheville

      • Uptick with faculty looking for tools to be online. They've gone from 6 or 7 in past years to 17
      • Sharing resources with colleagues within the department or at other institutions

      Shannon Hauser, University of Mary Washington

      • They've seen a disconnect between their LMS (Canvas) and Domains with the LMS winning out

      Colin Madland, Trinity Western University

      • Didn't have a culture of online teaching
      • Fine arts department started tinkering and others within the department are using that template. They spent some time and thought in the Summer and that made it easier for them in the fall.

      Jim Groom talked about a "motherblog" (a planet made via RSS). How can we center the idea of a webmention hub to do this?

      There was a lot of reversion to what was comfortable in the move to all online pedagogy. Professors were comfortable with lectures, so they stuck with that. There wasn't an emphasis on actual learning.

      I should note Glenn Zucman's art work to Colin to pass along to their art department. There could be a community of use cases that might help each other experiment and expand on their ideas.

    1. @7:40:

      We're aware that some students might actually revel in the gymnastics of a sophiscated writing and retrieval system like this. Now, we don't want to subordinate the material to the system, nor is the system merely being used to provide an alternative to a classroom experience. What we are striving for is to make a flexible system with lots of interesting material so that we may serve the needs of a genuinely contemporary student.

    1. Academy Games has always prided itself in the quality of its rules. Most of our rules are taught in stages, allowing you to start playing as soon as possible without needing to read everything. We are very careful about the order we teach rules and rely heavily on graphics and pictures to facilitate understanding. We also include a large number of detailed picture examples, often with 3D renders, that help you understand the context of the rules.
  5. Mar 2021
    1. A great little outline for how to do class retrospectives. While there's a lot of subtlety and a huge gradient between individual learners many of the methods and pro/con lists help to show the differences between them. I'd be curious to see one try all (or as many as possibly) to cover as many of the eventualities as possible.

      Too often teachers don't bother with these, but they can be incredibly useful, particularly for helping to attempt to improve future incarnations, as well as to guard against the curse of knowledge.

      I like that hyperlink.academy is doing some of the necessary work to expose their teachers to this sort of material. Too often it is only done in the academy in perfunctory ways which aren't designed to improve anything. Additionally the academy provides little, if any, training in the areas of pedagogy. Hyperlink.academy is making strides to provide some of this material and doing a reasonable job of exposing their teachers to it.

    1. This curse of knowledge also explains the danger behind thinking about student learning based on what appears best to faculty members, as opposed to what has been verified with students.

      Are there other axes or criteria that might be used other than these two? One seems better than the other, but what appears best to teachers is potentially better than nothing. (Though in cases it could be so bad that nothing may be preferable to a teacher's viewpoint.)

    1. Tatiana Mac talks about some broad web accessibility tips, but from the perspective of adding them for potential learners who may appreciate the alternate modalities to improve their learning and comprehension.

    2. Visualise written content into a more dynamic way. Many people, some neurodivergent folks especially, benefit from information being distilled into diagrams, comics, or less word-dense formats. Visuals can also benefit people who might not read/understand the language you wrote it in. They can also be an effective lead-in to your long-form from visually-driven avenues like Pinterest or Instagram.

      This is also a great exercise for readers and learners. If the book doesn't do this for you already, spend some time to annotate it or do it yourself.

    3. I've broken down each base medium with some of its benefits, tips, and opportunities to make your content more accessible.

      Accessibility is definitely a great goal, but how can one also make it more memorable/rememberable or more sticky?

      What methods are there outside of [[Made to Stick]]?

    4. Unfortunately, so many of our tutorials (and media in general) only comes in one form. When our teachings are only provided in one media, in one language, in one form, it is inherently inaccessible to some subset of our students.
    5. No matter how engaging, funny, well-produced the video is, I will not be able to retain it unless I cannot read along.

      I'm wondering how people of various stripes like this and other versions may or may not relate to the variety of mnemotechniques out there.

    1. A summary/paraphrase of specific parts of the article you found interesting Definitions of terms used in the article (with links)References to people/places/things mentioned in the article (with links or images/videos)Opinions (respectfully, with evidence)Questions Links to related materials or further evidence on the same subject 

      This is a great list of some common types of annotations for students just starting out, but it misses one key annotation that I think is the goal of all annotations:

      New ideas from the reader that have been sparked by the writing.

      Incidentally, this is also one of the more difficult types to create and it's also harder to model to students.

      In some sense, many of these annotation types fall relatively neatly into Bloom's taxonomy with my addendum falling under the top level of the pyramid usually labeled "create".

    1. Particularly striking in 1971 was his call for advanced technology to support "learning webs": The operation of a peer-matching network would be simple. The user would identify himself by name and address and describe the activity for which he sought a peer. A computer would send him back the names and addresses of all those who had inserted the same description. It is amazing that such a simple utility has never been used on a broad scale for publicly valued activity.
    1. I've also invited (that is assigned) students to participate in knowledge creation in the graph by adding content to fill "blank nodes" I've made as I've been inserting my content. They can choose which keywords or subtopics they want to learn a little more about, do a bit of research, write a summary that will be useful to their fellow students, and cite their sources.

      This exercise also makes it more apparent to students that their work and research can go on to make improvements to the field in general. Writing papers in college is a dreadful exercise for students who often don't see the point. While this may be like learning bowling with the gutter rails raised, it certainly helps bridge the gap many students may have.

      The added benefit is that they might see their work live on in a textbook they may have used and in which they now have a credit.

    2. I returned to another OER Learning Circle and wrote an ebook version of a Modern World History textbook. As I wrote this, I tested it out on my students. I taught them to use the annotation app, Hypothesis, and assigned them to highlight and comment on the chapters each week in preparation for class discussions. This had the dual benefits of engaging them with the content, and also indicating to me which parts of the text were working well and which needed improvement. Since I wasn't telling them what they had to highlight and respond to, I was able to see what elements caught students attention and interest. And possibly more important, I was able to "mind the gaps', and rework parts that were too confusing or too boring to get the attention I thought they deserved.

      This is an intriguing off-label use case for Hypothes.is which is within the realm of peer-review use cases.

      Dan is essentially using the idea of annotation as engagement within a textbook as a means of proactively improving it. He's mentioned it before in Hypothes.is Social (and Private) Annotation.

      Because one can actively see the gaps without readers necessarily being aware of their "review", this may be a far better method than asking for active reviews of materials.

      Reviewers are probably not as likely to actively mark sections they don't find engaging. Has anyone done research on this space for better improving texts? Certainly annotation provides a means for helping to do this.

    3. I hadn't really thought that much about the pedagogical aspects (they don't really teach PhD historians pedagogy where I went to school, or I missed it somehow, so I've been trying to educate myself since then).

      Don't feel bad, I don't think many (any?!) programs do this. It's a terrible disservice to academia.

      Examples of programs that do this would be fantastic to have. Or even an Open Education based course that covers some of this would be an awesome thing to see.

    1. Because annotating a syllabus conveys a message–from day one–that course documents are not static artifacts, that something authored by an instructor is not unwelcoming of feedback, and that student voice is both appreciated and necessary for a shared endeavor.

      This helps to turn the class into a community.

      It also establishes the class as an ongoing conversation of learning with all the participants.

      It sets up the teacher not simply as the unquestionable "sage-on-the-stage" but as a guide through the material.

      If we didn't question our teachers, their ideas, their writings, and learn new things, we could have stopped at Aristotle and everyone would still think the Earth was the center of the universe and that feathers fall as fast as bowling balls.

  6. Feb 2021
    1. les objectifs à atteindre ne sont pas codés au départ

      Ouverture des objectifs, en renversement direct de la conception inversée si chère à l'ingénierie pédagogique. Les résultats d'apprentissage ne sont pas dans une relation de causalité linéaire avec les objectifs d'apprentissages.

    1. Spent some time browsing through the wealth of resources here. What a great site. Greg McVerry will appreciate it and many of the curated resources which he may be able to remix and reuse.

    1. This seems like the sort of thing Greg McVerry would appreciate.

    2. The final missing piece was Post-It notes, a strategy I borrowed from Deb Verhoeven. (Thanks, Deb!) Every student starts with a green Post-It note on her laptop. That means everything’s OK. Run into a problem that they need me for? Swap it out for red. Finished? Swap it out for white.

      This is a clever tip and is reminiscent of Churrascaria restaurants which often have wooden blocks or figures on the table painted red on one end and green on the other and diners flip it to indicate: stop bringing food for a while or bring more food respectively.

      I've also seen another version in the now-defunct Souplantation restaurants which had laminate cards to indicate you were off at the buffet and please don't clear the table yet as you're still dining.

  7. Jan 2021
    1. But we would need to intentionally center care and well-being as a primary condition of learning and be willing to set our obsession with achievement -- gently, even if momentarily -- aside.

      post-pandemic pedagogy

  8. Dec 2020
    1. It’s no coincidence that we walk when we need to think: evidence shows that movement enhances thinking and learning, and both are activated in the same centre of motor control in the brain. In the influential subfield of cognitive science concerned with ‘embodied’ cognition, one prominent claim is that actions themselves are constitutive of cognitive processes. That is, activities such as playing a musical instrument, writing, speaking or dancing don’t start in the brain and then emanate out to the body as actions; rather, they entail the mind and body working in concert as a creative, integrated whole, unfolding and influencing each other in turn. It’s therefore a significant problem that many of us are trapped in work and study environments that don’t allow us to activate these intuitive cognitive muscles, and indeed often even encourage us to avoid them.

      I'm curious if Lynne Kelly or others have looked into these areas of research with their Memory work? She's definitely posited that singing and dancing as well as creating art helps indigenous cultures in their memory work.

  9. Oct 2020
    1. proctored, multiple-choice tests are necessary to prepare students to take other multiple-choice assessments they may encounter in the course of their education

      Important point. We design not only courses, but programs, and they relate to experiences after the program.

    2. And though flags from this software don’t automatically mean students will be penalized—instructors can review the software’s suspicions and decide for themselves how to proceed—it leaves open the possibility that instructors’ own biases will determine whether to bring academic dishonesty charges against students. Even just an accusation could negatively affect a student’s academic record, or at the very least how their instructor perceives them and their subsequent work.

      The companies are hiding behind this as a feature - that the algorithms are not supposed to be implemented without human review. I wonder how this "feature" will interact with implicit (and explicit) biases, or with the power dynamics between adjuncts, students, and departmental administration.

      The companies are caught between a rock and a hard place in the decision whether students should be informed that their attempt was flagged for review, or not. We see that, if the student is informed, it causes stress and pain and damage to the teacher-student relationship. But if they're not informed, all these issues of bias and power become invisible.

    1. Unfortunately, saying, "Build a relationship" is too vague and leaves too much up to the teacher's instincts.

      Not just in regards to students processing trauma, unfortunately...

    1. TECHNOLOGY ADOPTION IN HIGHER EDUCATION: OVERCOMING ANXIETY THROUGH FACULTY BOOTCAMP

      This article uses educational theory to examine why educators feel anxiety in association with learning and using new technologies and how best to teach new technologies without triggering anxiety. 7/10, good discussion of theories and methods along with reasoning.

  10. ecomentor.itee.radom.pl ecomentor.itee.radom.pl
    1. Farewell to Pedagogy

      The Article often compares Andragogy to Pedagogy and how they are different and should not be confused. The Article goes in depth into core assumptions of Andragogy.

      8/10

    1. Adult learning theories: Implications for learning and teaching

      Article provides an in depth discussion of learning theories as applied to adult learners. Diagrams are particularly helpful. Clear discussion of Knowles, i.e., how adult and child learning differs. Rating 8/10

    1. it encourages a “growth” mindset: the belief that your abilities can improve with your efforts.

      I'll be this also helps with their feeling of "flow" too.

    2. “Many thought, okay to get from A to B there are these three steps, but it turns out there are really five or six,”

      Sounds a lot like the mathematicians who came after Perelman to show that his proof of Poincare was correct--they needed help in getting from A to B too.

    1. As I'm reading this page I can't help but think about how it potentially predates and underlies the idea of the wiki which came just a few years after this piece of software.

    1. Pearson, the publisher whose Texas textbook raises questions about the quality of Harlem Renaissance literature, said such language “adds more depth and nuance.”

      If they wanted to add more "depth and nuance" wouldn't they actually go into greater depth on the topic by adding pages instead of subtly painting it such a discouraging light?

      But Texas students will read that some critics “dismissed the quality of literature produced.”

    2. “The textbook companies are not gearing their textbooks toward teachers; they’re gearing their textbooks toward states,” she said.

      And even at this they should be gearing them honestly and truthfully toward the students.

    1. Therefore it is a great valuefor fixing a memory-image that when we read books, we strive to impress onour memory through the power of forming our mental images not only thenumber and order of verses or ideas, but at the same time the color, shape,position, and placement of the letters, where we have seen this or that writ-ten, in what part, in what location (at the top, the middle, or the bottom)we saw it positioned, in what color we observed the trace of the letter or theornamented surface of the parchment

      I've always been able to generally remember how far into a book and on what part of the page (left/right; top/middle/bottom) the thing was. This obviously is not a new phenomenon, though obviously the printing of texts in the modern age helps standardize this for students in comparison with this particular example which discusses different versions of the same text.

    1. She said that her institution, which has inclusive-access agreements with more than 25 publishers, had saved students more than $2 million this semester alone.

      $ 2million compared to what? To everyone having purchased the textbooks at going rates before? This is a false comparison because not everyone bought new in the first place. Many bought used, and many more still probably either pirated, borrowed from a friend, from the library, or simply went without.

    2. The "inclusive" aspect of the model means that every student has the same materials on the first day of class, with the charge included as part of their tuition.

      It almost sounds to me like they know they're not getting a cut of the money from poorer students who are finding the material for free online anyway, so they're trying to up the stakes of the piece of pie that they're getting from a different angle.

      This other model of subscription at the level of the college or university is also one that they're well aware of based on involvement with subscription fees for journal access.

    1. Equipping, however, is about agency. It’s about providing access and opportunities for public participation and production. Equipping is about teaching and interconnected learning. It’s about exchanging skills and resource. It’s a redistribution of power between institutions and individuals.And it scares the hell out of people in power.I’ll offer a bit more definition here on what equipping is not. Equipping is not the same as empowerment because, much like the phrase “giving voice to the voiceless” assumes that people are voiceless, empowerment often assumes that people are powerless.

      This is also a useful concept for teaching as well.

    1. working in public, and asking students to work in public, is fraught with dangers and challenges.
    2. What David told me was his energy, enthusiasm in the class was at a much higher level with the OER approach. Sure we choose the polished “professional” textbook because of its assumed high standards, quality etc, but then its a more passive relationship a teacher has with it. I make the comparison to growing and/or making your own food versus having it prepared or taking it out of a package. Having produced our own food means we know everything about it from top to bottom, and the pride in doing that has to make the whole experience much more energized.

      As I read both this post and this comment from Alan, I can't help but think again about scholars in the 14th century who taught students. It was more typical of the time that students were "forced" to chose their own textbooks--typically there were fewer, and at the advent of the printing press they were significantly higher in price. As a result students had to spend more time and attention, as Robin indicates here, to come up with useful things.

      Even in this period students often annotated their books, which often got passed on to other students and even professors which helped future generations. So really, we're not reinventing the wheel here, we're just doing it anew with new technology that makes doing it all the easier.

      As a reference, I'll suggest folks interested in this area read Owen Gingerich's The Book Nobody Read.

    3. If OER is free, what hidden costs exist in its production? Making these textbooks is taking me a chunk of time in the off-season.  Thanks to my salaried position, I feel ok about putting in the overtime, but it’s a privilege my colleagues who teach under year-to-year part-time non-contracts can’t afford. Who should be funding OER creation? Institutions? Students? For-profit start-ups? How will you invest time in this project without obscuring the true costs of academic labor? Right now, we pass the corruptly high cost of academic publishing onto the backs of academia’s most vulnerable members: students. But as OER gains steam, we need to come up with funding models that don’t land us back in the same quagmire of exploitation that we were trying to get out of.

      This is a nearly perfect question and something to watch in the coming years.

    4. Most of the actual texts in the Heath were public domain texts, freely available and not under any copyright restrictions.  As the Heath produced new editions (of literature from roughly 1400-1800!), forcing students to buy new textbooks or be irritatingly out of sync with page numbers, and as students turned to rental markets that necessitated them giving their books back at the end of the semester, I began to look in earnest for an alternative.

      Repackaging public domain texts and charging a steep markup too much above and beyond the cost of the paper is just highway robbery. Unless a publisher is adding some actual annotative or analytical value, they shouldn't be charging outrageous prices for textbooks of this nature.

    1. cyberinfrastructure is something more specific thanthe network itself, but it is something more general than a tool or a resource developed for a particular proj-ect, a range of projects, or, even more broadly, for a particular discipline.

      Mentioned in the video https://youtu.be/lelmXaSibrc?t=17m35s

    1. There was also opportunity to connect with other students.

      I'm glad you had at least a little bit of this. The system I saw used for third graders left almost zero space for inter-student interaction or socialization which was a miserable experience.

    1. Paquette outlines 3 sets of foundational values of open pedagogy, namely:  autonomy and interdependence; freedom and responsibility; democracy and participation.
    2. open pedagogy is currently a sort of proxy for the use and creation of open educational resources as opposed to being tied to a broader pedagogical objective.
    3. And to Vivian Rolfe’s point made at OpenEd 16, are we are paying enough attention to voices of the past?

      And of course, there's the flip side of thinking about the voices of the future as well. Looking at the past is a nice exercise, but consider what those in the past would have potentially done differently if they could have seen the future? We should spend a moment or two of reflection on what the future potentially holds with the prior of where we are right now.

    4. us ed tech folks will recognize some of the themes – individualized learning, learner choice, self-direction, – to name a few.

      Aren't these all just Montessori principles under a different name?

    1. After all, Harry Potter wouldn’t have completed his Potions course were it not for an annotated version of the Advanced Potion-Making textbook.

      One also has to question for pedagogy’s sake why the new professor of the course continued the adoption of that text which was patently “off” in its recipes to the point that a student who had the corrections and better descriptions (via those annotations) excelled while others were only passable?

    2. Some researchers have referred to this type of learning arrangement as anchored discussion.23 When students “talk” with one another about a shared text through digital annotation, evidence suggests.d-undefined, .lh-undefined { background-color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.2) !important; }.d-undefined, .lh-undefined { background-color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.5) !important; }3Lauren Zucker, Jeffrey Pomerantz, Maha Bali annotation affords richer conversation as students pay closer attention to the text, establish more proximal connections between their discussion and the source material, and embrace opportunities to elaborate their ideas, clarify, and learn from the viewpoints of their peers.
    1. Creative Commons Attribution NonCommercial

      I'm gearing up my reading list for the holidays. I wanted to add An Urgency of Teachers: the Work of Critical Digital Pedagogy by Jesse Stommel and Sean Michael Morris. Seemingly I can only find .html, .azw3, and .pdf copies of the book, and I'd far prefer an .epub version. Fortunately the book has a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International license (CC BY-NC 4.0), so I've spent some time this morning to convert an original and made myself an .epub version for my Android devices.

      I'm happy to share it if others are looking for the same and don't have the ability (or frankly the time) to make the conversion. I also have a .mobi version (for Kindle) of the text as well since it didn't require much additional work. These are exact replicas with no changes and come with the same CC BY-NC 4.0 license. If Jesse or Sean want copies to make available on their site, I'm happy to send them along. 

      If you have the means, please be sure to make a donation to help support the book and Sean and Jesse's work.

      Originally posted at https://boffosocko.com/2019/12/19/alternate-formats-of-an-urgency-of-teachers-by-jesse-stommel-and-sean-michael-morris/

    1. Because students know their work will be used both by their peers and potentially by future generations of students, they invest in this work at a different level.

      I'm wondering if Greg McVerry stated something along these lines at the beginning of EDU522? I suspected he's planning something along these lines, but I'm unsure if it was stated specifically. Students should also know about creative commons and be actively opting in to creating this content as open while they're doing it. They also shouldn't be forced into opening it up, or if they do, not necessarily taking credit for it if they choose not to.

    2. Free to accessFree to reuseFree to reviseFree to remixFree to redistributeThe question becomes, then, what is the relationship between these additional capabilities and what we know about effective teaching and learning? How can we extend, revise, and remix our pedagogy based on these additional capabilities?

      I look at this and think immediatly about the Git model of allowing people to not only fork and reuse/redistribute pieces, but what about the ability to do pull requests to take improvements and push them back up the the source so that everyone potentially benefits?

    1. If you think mathematics is difficult, tough, or you're scared of it, this article will indicate why and potentially show you a way forward for yourself and your children.

    2. The low achievers did not know less, they just did not use numbers flexibly—probably because they had been set on the wrong pathway, from an early age, of trying to memorize methods and number facts instead of interacting with numbers flexibly.4
    1. Finally, the best HyFlex classrooms have someone assisting the faculty member.

      This is the understatement of the year. Faculty members will require extensive training and LOTS of assistance. This assistance SHOULD NOT come from student assistants, graduate students (who are likely to be heavily undertrained), or other "free" sources.

    2. It’s important to note that the goal of HyFlex is two make both the online and in-person experiences equal.

      There are some pieces of this that immediately make me think that this model is more of a sort of "separate, but equal" sort of modality. Significant resources will need to go toward the equality piece and even then it is likely to fall short from a social perspective.

    1. They are allowed to operate independently and explore with personal freedom.

      There is still typically a "thing(s)" they need to learn, a goal they need to reach, or standards that are typically set, so the freedom only goes so far.

    1. Ahrens notes that in most cases, students fail not because of a lack of ability, but because they lose a personal connection to what they are learning: “When even highly intelligent students fail in their studies, it’s most often because they cease to see the meaning in what they were supposed to learn (cf. Balduf 2009), are unable to make a connection to their personal goals (Glynn et al. 2009) or lack the ability to control their own studies autonomously and on their own terms (Reeve and Jan 2006; Reeve 2009).”
    1. “Professional development often meant filling in to an auditorium and being talked at from a stage,” says Ferguson.

      Naturally, because you know, educators know how to educate other educators, right?!

    1. "There’s one great quote that’s attributed to Confucius: 'I hear and I forget, I see and I remember, I do and I understand,'" says Case. "I really believe in the potential of the interactive mediums."

      This is related to the broad idea of modality shifts in more modern educational contexts.

    1. Institutions, publics, and some media elites are encouraging academics to be more visible in the public sphere.

      I can't help but be reminded of the early professoriate in the 1400's when teachers were expected to be well known or interesting enough to have their own local following and pull in their own individual students. If they weren't the right sort of thought leaders or didn't teach the "right" subjects, they failed as teachers and were kicked out of the university. Social media in this era would have been more interesting whereas, now it barely seems to be a direct economic factor. (cross reference O. Gingerich, The Book Nobody Read)

    1. Learning and Teaching Letter Grades are the Enemy of Authentic & Humane Learning: Bernard Bull discusses how grades work against authentic and self-determined learning. Although they are ingrained in education, he recommends considering the aspects of life free from grades and having these conversations with others. What is interesting is this is only one post being shared at the moment. Bill Ferriter shared his concerns about the association between standard grades and fixed mindset, while Will Richardson argues that grades only matter because we choose to let them matter.This continues some of the points discussed in Clive Rose’s book The End of Average and Jesse Stommell’s presentation on grades and the LMS. It is also something that Templestowe College has touched in the development of alternative pathways to higher education.

      Thanks for aggregating a variety of sources here!

      I'd recently come across Robert Talbert's post <cite>Traditional Grading: The Great Demotivator</cite> which likely fits into this same sub-topic.

    1. At the same time, a positive emotional experience alone is not enough. For tools for thought to attain enduring power, the user must experience a real growth in mastery, an expansion in their ability to act. And so we’d like to take both the emotional and intellectual experience of tools for thought seriously.

      How can they also reach the idea of "flow"?

    2. Our experience is that many of today’s technology leaders genuinely venerate Engelbart, Kay, and their colleagues. Many even feel that computers have huge potential as tools for improving human thinking. But they don’t see how to build good businesses around developing new tools for thought. And without such business opportunities, work languishes.

      Some of these ideas in this section tangentially touch on the broader problems of EdTech. Technology isn't necessarily the answer.

      They're onto something, but I feel like they're missing a huge grounding in areas of pedagogy, teaching, EdTech history, and even memory and memory research.

    1. I find it somewhat interesting to note that with 246 public annotations on this page using Hypothes.is, that from what I can tell as of 4/2/2019 only one of them is a simple highlight. All the rest are highlights with an annotation or response of some sort.

      It makes me curious to know what the percentage distribution these two types have on the platform. Is it the case that in classroom settings, which many of these annotations appear to have been made, that much of the use of the platform dictates more annotations (versus simple highlights) due to the performative nature of the process?

      Is it possible that there are a significant number of highlights which are simply hidden because the platform automatically defaults these to private? Is the friction of making highlights so high that people don't bother?

      I know that Amazon will indicate heavily highlighted passages in e-books as a feature to draw attention to the interest relating to those passages. Perhaps it would be useful/nice if Hypothes.is would do something similar, but make the author of the highlights anonymous? (From a privacy perspective, this may not work well on articles with a small number of annotators as the presumption could be that the "private" highlights would most likely be directly attributed to those who also made public annotations.

      Perhaps the better solution is to default highlights to public and provide friction-free UI to make them private?

      A heavily highlighted section by a broad community can be a valuable thing, but surfacing it can be a difficult thing to do.

    1. "We learn by engaging and sharing with others, and a digital environment enables you to do that in a much more effective way."

      An interesting pedagogical point, but then the question becomes: "Should we necessarily do it within your company's specific siloed domain?"

    1. Moreover, the teacher repeatedly asks, “Did anyone get a different answer?” or “Did anyone use a different method?” to elicit multiple solutions strategies. This highlights the connections between different problems, concepts, and areas of mathematics and helps develop students’ mathematical creativity. Creativity is further fostered through acknowledging “good mistakes.” Students who make an error are often commended for the progress they made and how their work contributed to the discussion and to the collective understanding of the class.
    2. Andrews, P., & Hatch, G. (2001). Hungary and its characteristic pedagogical flow. Proceedings of the British Congress of Mathematics Education, 21(2). 26-40. Stockton, J. C. (2010). Education of Mathematically Talented Students in Hungary. Journal of Mathematics Education at Teachers College, 1(2), 1-6.

      references to read

    1. It looks to me like Andy and Michael are grasping at recreating with modern technology and tools what many (most? all?) indigenous cultures around the world used to ritually learn and memorize their culture's knowledge. Mnemonics, spaced repetition, graded initiation, orality, dance, and song were all used as a cohesive whole to do this.

      The best introduction to many of these methods and their pedagogic uses is best described by Lynne Kelly's book Knowledge and Power in Prehistoric Societies: Orality, Memory, and the Transmission of Culture.

      If they take her ideas as a basis and then layer on their own thinking, I think they'll get much further much quicker. Based on my reading of their work thus far, they're limiting themselves.

    1. The current buzz about open pedagogy got kick-started in David Wiley’s 2013 blog post. Wiley defined open pedagogy as any approach or technique that would not be possible without the “5Rs” (at the time listed as the “4Rs plus free to access”: free to access, free to reuse, free to revise, free to remix, free to redistribute – the right to retain came later…) of OER.
    1. I ran across this 5 year old article courtesy of a few recent tweets:

      This took me back to a time and something I’d forgotten writing, that has made me rethink where we are now: https://t.co/COgNQnutZr

      — Kate Bowles (@KateMfD) April 25, 2020
      <script async src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script>

      “power is distributed very unevenly throughout the global network of higherEd institutions. If digital innovation is left to the market, we will continue to see scale and standardisation dressed up as personalisation and differentiation.” ⁦@KateMfDhttps://t.co/pqskuKPbQj

      — Robin DeRosa (@actualham) April 25, 2020
      <script async src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script>

      What surprises me is that it's about education and pedagogy that starts off with a vignette in which Kate Bowles talks about the unknown purpose of Stonehenge.

      But I've been doing some serious reading on the humanities relating to memory, history, and indigenous cultures over the last few years. It dawns on me:

      I know what those stones are for!

      A serious answer provided by Australian science and memory researcher Dr. Lynne Kelly indicates that Stonehenge and similar monolithic sites built by indigenous cultures across the world are--in fact--pedagogic tools!!

      We've largely lost a lot of the roots of our ancient mnemonic devices through gradual mis- and dis-use as well as significant pedagogic changes by Petrus Ramus, an influential French dialectician, humanist, logician, and educational reformer. Scholar Frances Yates indicated in The Art of Memory that his influential changes in the mid-1500's disassociated memory methods including the method of loci, which dated back to ancient Greece, from the practice of rhetoric as a field of study. As a result we've lost a fantastic tradition that made teaching and the problem of memory far worse.

      Fortunately Lynne Kelly gives a fairly comprehensive overview of indigenous cultures across human history and their use of these methods along with evidence in her book Memory Code which is based on her Ph.D. thesis. Even better, she didn't stop there and she wrote a follow up book that explores the use of these methods and places them into a modern pedagogy setting and provides some prescriptive uses.

      I might suggest that instead of looking forward to technology as the basis of solutions in education, that instead we look back---not just to our past or even our pre-industrial past, but back to our pre-agrarian past.

      Let's look back to the tremendous wealth of indigenous tribes the world over that modern society has eschewed as "superstitious" and "simple". In reality, they had incredibly sophisticated oral stories and systems that they stored in even more sophisticated memory techniques. Let's relearn and reuse those techniques to make ourselves better teachers and improve our student's ability to learn and retain the material with which they're working.

      Once we've learned to better tap our own memories, we'll realize how horribly wrong we've been for not just decades but centuries.

      This has been hard earned knowledge for me, but now that I've got it, I feel compelled to share it. I'm happy to chat with people about these ideas to accelerate their growth, but I'd recommend getting them from the source and reading Dr. Kelly's work directly. (Particularly her work with indigenous peoples of Australia, who helped to unlock a large piece of the puzzle for her.) Then let's work together to rebuild the ancient edifices that our ancestors tried so desperately to hand down, but we've managed to completely forget.

      The historical and archaeological record: The Memory Code: The Secrets of Stonehenge, Easter Island and Other Ancient Monuments by Dr. Lynne Kelly

      A variety of methods and teaching examples: Memory Craft: Improve Your Memory with the Most Powerful Methods in History by Dr. Lynne Kelly

    1. I want to have ways to show learners that I chose the texts for them, as I’m convinced that empathy is motivating.

      I quite like this idea as a means of pedagogy.

    1. Third, the post-LMS world should protect the pedagogical prerogatives and intellectual property rights of faculty members at all levels of employment. This means, for example, that contingent faculty should be free to take the online courses they develop wherever they happen to be teaching. Similarly, professors who choose to tape their own lectures should retain exclusive rights to those tapes. After all, it’s not as if you have to turn over your lecture notes to your old university whenever you change jobs.

      Own your pedagogy. Send just like anything else out there...

  11. Aug 2020
    1. Transformed Practice. In applying these ideas to curriculum realities over the past decade, we have reframed these ideas somewhat and translated them into the more immediately recognisable pedagogical acts or ‘knowledge processes’ of ‘Experiencing’, ‘Conceptualising’, ‘Analysing’ and ‘Applying’

      pedagogical acts/knowledge processes of transformative pedagogy/multiliteracy pedagogy are experiencing, conceptualizing, analyzing, and applying

  12. Jul 2020
    1. The word “pedagogy,” as we use it, defines the work of education at the intersection of theory and practice — the act of teaching that derives from reflection and which inspires reflection again. Pedagogy is both where “critical” and “digital” terminate, and also the whole terrain of teaching.

      I agree with this. Creating divisions on how pedagogy relates to one age group over another takes away from the key developments around education and pedagogy, and creates a slightly more disconnected, disjointed field for education. Good education and educational practices are just that - the subject or age specificity can distract from otherwise good practices and theories that can and often do transcend the disciplines.

  13. Jun 2020
    1. prioritize technology, for example, as these are easier elements to hook onto

      In my campus's summer professional development, prep for next term's "remote learning," many colleagues are seeing this limitation. Tech is the sparkly thing, easy to focus on. We say "pedagogy before technology," but many are really focused on what tech to use, how to preserve as much of last year's f2f as possible, etc. Most of which isn't helping plan for fall classes.

  14. May 2020
    1. What is missing from most of the remote teaching contingency planning is a framework for helping the people inside institutions understand and make decisions about pedagogy from inside the pandemic’s evolving reality. Pedagogy is not an ancillary or optional part of conversations about remote teaching. Pedagogy is the category that describes how we teach. For that reason, whether we foreground it or not, pedagogy is a key part of how our learners understand and assess their experience at our institutions during this crisis.

      Important points - technology is not pedagogy; pedagogy is related to identity and mission.

  15. Apr 2020
    1. Sure. So I do want to start by just reminding listeners that talking about trauma, learning about trauma, can bring up some feelings, which is a very normal reaction to that. So I just want to remind people, if you notice that, that it’s okay to take a rain check on listening and engaging in this conversation. I also do recommend that even if you feel okay to engage with a discussion about trauma that it’s recommended that you do so in small doses, especially during these very challenging times.

      This is a lovely way to introduce this topic.

  16. Mar 2020
    1. The latest email on Pandemic Projects is a gem; as an English teacher, I have been forced to get my head around the concepts and technologies involved with online teaching at a rapid pace.

      English teacher being forced to teach online. New times.

    1. "The MUSIC® Model of Motivation (MUSIC model; Jones, 2009, 2018) was created to help instructors identify strategies to motivate and engage their students. The model does so by providing five research-based categories of strategies that have been shown to affect students’ motivation and engagement: eMpowerment, Usefulness, Success, Interest, and Caring (MUSIC is an acronym based on the initial sounds of these five categories)."

  17. Feb 2020
    1. I was hoping that more people would read this, look through Wakelet, and be prompted to consider the role of ritual in their workplaces. Gonna keep looking at this myself, especially in my own life.

      https://youtu.be/yiKFYTFJ_kw

    1. Over the two weeks, I realized that listening is a cornerstone of pedagogical justice.

      An approach to education influenced by the Italian Resistance Movement in WWI, the Reggio Emilia Approach, identifies listening as a pedagogy and Carlina Rinaldi articulates it well. Here are some quotes from collaborative work from [Reggio Children and Harvard's Project Zero] x

  18. Jan 2020
    1. I didn’t know where the class was headed

      Another Reggio philosophy is understanding that to practice a Pedagogy of Listening and teaching into the intentions of our students makes us vulnerable and that we have to become more comfortable living with doubt and uncertainty. We participate in a process of Negotiated Learning that is child originated and teacher framed. This is an early childhood approach, and my background (K-4). Possibly adolescents can frame their own learning? Here is more info on Negotiated Learning.

  19. Dec 2019
    1. What do we mean by ‘pedagogy’ in ‘pedagogy first’? Towards a Digital Pedagog

      Excellent webinar on technology and pedagogy

    1. 3 sets of foundational values of open pedagogy, namely:  autonomy and interdependence; freedom and responsibility; democracy and participation.

      compare to Downes' MOOC design principles. Autonomy - diversity - openness - interactivity

  20. Nov 2019
    1. In this text, authors Kit Kacirek and Michael Miller explore adult learning for mature adults, or those identified as senior citizens. Research into mature adult learning programs centered around leisure activities, reveals situational pedagogy in which some traditional adult learning theory may need to be adapted to suit the cognitive changes in adults with advanced age. A brief description of the research methods reveals that adults in advanced age prefer lecture, use of media, and field trips. The implications for such a study are useful as the population of mature adults grows due to advancements in medicine and thus the demand for learning opportunities increases as well.