9 Matching Annotations
  1. Mar 2021
  2. Feb 2021
    1. One study suggests that academics who write daily and set goals with someone weekly write nearly ten times as many pages as those without regular writing habits.

      See Silvia, P. J. (2018). How to Write a Lot: A Practical Guide to Productive Academic Writing (Second Edition). APA LifeTools.

    1. An academic blogger may feel constrained to topics only related to his or her academic research, whereas a blogger who is also an academic is free to explore wider fields of discussion.

      This idea of "identity" is important. Many academics don't even think of themselves as authors let alone bloggers.

  3. Sep 2020
    1. Writing in the margins has always been an essential activity for students.

      I never really got into the habit of writing in the margins of books, it was something that never really occurred to me. While I am still hesitant to write in the margins of physical books, doing so digitally does appeal. Something I am starting to get more into, now that I'm on the journey to getting my Arts and Humanities degree.

  4. Jan 2019
    1. I will complicate both narratives, showing that each depends on earlier devel-opments.

      classic scholarly move -- I'm appreciating the repeated use of the personal "I" through here. I've noticed (both here and in Paul's class) that scholars of rhetoric seem more amenable to personal insertion into academic writing.

  5. Sep 2018
  6. Oct 2017
    1. Kamler, Barbara. 2008. “Rethinking Doctoral Publication Practices: Writing from and beyond the Thesis.” Studies in Higher Education 33 (3): 283–94. doi:10.1080/03075070802049236.

  7. Nov 2016