135 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
  2. Jul 2020
    1. The students in Raphael Folsom’s Spanish Borderlands course read primary sources on a weekly basis. Rather than taking notes on 3×5 index cards as we did when I was a kid, the students take the same type of note in the Drupal system. They fill out some basic bibliographic information about the source, write a short summary of the source, and then take a note about an interesting facet of the text.

      I've been trying this sort of thing out with a TiddlyWiki for a while and have got a reasonable sort of workflow for doing it. The key is to reduce the overhead so that one can quickly take notes in a manner that interlinks them and makes it seem worthwhile to come back to them to review and potentially reorganize them. Doing this practice in public has a lot of value as well. I'll have to come back and look at some of how this was built at a later time.

    1. Although I’ve already got a blog (you’re reading it!), I decided not to mirror my book reviews here. I post normal content so infrequently that anyone who wanted to read the blog but wasn’t interested in book reviews would be inundated with content they didn’t want. In the end, I spun up an additional WordPress instance on my web space (something that my host, Krystal Hosting, makes very easy to do) to keep the reviews completely isolated from everything else.

      This seems to be a frequent excuse for people to spin up yet another website rather than attempting to tackle the UI subscription problem.

      Social readers would be well advised to think about this problem so people could have a single website with multiple types/kinds of content.

      Platforms should better delineate how to allow publishers and readers to more easily extract the posts that they're interested in following.

  3. Jun 2020
    1. Interestingly, I’ve found that Kindle is useful in this respect. I buy Kindle versions of books that I need for work, and highlight passages and bookmark pages as I go. And when I’ve finished the software obligingly has a collection of all the passages I’ve highlighted.

      John, you should spend a minute or two to learn about Hypothes.is (https://web.hypothes.is/) as an online tool for doing this. It's a free account or you can self-host the software yourself if you like. There are also functionalities to have public, private, or group annotations. I often pull my own annotations to my personal website similar to your own Memex and publish them there (example: https://boffosocko.com/kind/annotation/)

      Syndicated copy: https://boffosocko.com/2020/05/21/55771248/)

  4. May 2020
    1. “In his influential De Copia (1512),” writes Professor Richard Yeo, “Erasmus advised that an abundant stock of quotations and maxims from classical texts be entered under various loci (places) to assist free-flowing oratory.” Arranged under ‘Heads’ and recorded as ‘common-places’ (loci communes), these commonplace books could be consulted for speeches and written compositions designed for various situations — in the law court, at ceremonial occasions, or in the dedication of a book to a patron. Typical headings included the classical topics of honour, virtue, beauty, friendship, and Christian ones such as God, Creation, faith, hope, or the names of the virtues and vices.
    2. The aim of these books wasn’t regurgitation but rather combinatorial creativity. People were encouraged to improvise on themes and topics. Gathering raw material alone — in this case, information — is not enough. We must transform it into something new. It is in this light that Seneca advised copying the bee and Einstein advised combinatorial play.

      I was really hoping for so much more in this essay on the combinatorial creativity, espcially since the author threw the idea into the title. The real meat must be in the two linked articles about Seneca and Einstein.

      There is a slight mention of combinatorics in the justaposition of pieces within one's commonplace book, and a mention that these books may date back to the 12th century where they were probably more influenced by the combinatoric creativity of Raymond Lull. It's still an open question for me just how far back the idea of commonplaces goes as well as how far back Lull's combinatoric pieces go...

    3. Neither ought anything to be collected whilst you are busied in reading; if by taking the pen in hand the thread of your reading be broken off, for that will make the reading both tedious and unpleasant.

      This is incredibly important for me, though in a more technology friendly age, I've got tools like Hypothes.is for quickly highlighting and annotating pages and can then later collect them into my commonplace book as notes to work with and manage after-the-fact.

    4. “Extraordinary Commonplaces,” Robert Darnton
    5. Early compilations involved various combinations of four crucial operations: storing, sorting, selecting, and summarizing, which I think of as the four S’s of text management. We too store, sort, select, and summarize information, but now we rely not only on human memory, manuscript, and print, as in earlier centuries, but also on computer chips, search functions, data mining, and Wikipedia, along with other electronic techniques.
    1. Gardens were also popular, the medieval sort of garden,with orderly beds of medicinal plants and fruit trees separated by grass andsurrounded by a wall. Undoubtedly, gardens became popular with monasticand later writers because of the Song of Songs, a preeminent text for mysticalmeditation. Various other Biblical structures were often used too: the Taber-nacle described in Exodus; the Temple described in  Kings; the Jerusalemcitadel envisioned by Ezekiel and often conflated with the Heavenly City ofthe Apocalypse. We now would never think to organize an encyclopedia ofknowledge on the plan of Noah’s Ark, but for a clerical audience to whomthis text was as familiar as the order of the alphabet is to us—why not? It is asimple (if large), clearly arranged (if imaginary) composition site, containingmany useful compartments with a straightforward route among them, a sortof foundational map to use in arranging your materials (orresin Latin) as yougather them into the location of your new composition from the networksof your experiences, including of course all your experiences of books, music,and other arts. Thus, in the course of an ideal medieval education, in addi-tion to acquiring a great many segments of scriptural and classical texts, onealso would acquire an extensive repertoire of image-schemes in which to putthem, both ‘‘to lay them away’’ and ‘‘to collect them’’ in new arrangementson later occasions.

      Again, another reference to gardens with respect to memorizing information. There's a direct correlation to some of the sorts of thinking tools many are using to create digital gardens or personal wikis. These ideas aren't new! Our predecessors were simply using different structures to store and remember them. Their tools were different, but their goals and general methods were ultimately the same.

    2. The complementary principle to dividing isgathering and collecting. Eachnew composition can also be conceived as a place into which culled and rec-ollected matters are gathered. The very concept of reading in Latin is basedonthenotionof‘‘gathering,’’Latinlegere, ‘‘to read’’ having as its root mean-ing ‘‘to collect up, to gather by picking, plucking, and the like.’’ The Greekverblegōhad a similar range of meaning, from ‘‘to lay’’ something down or‘‘to lay asleep’’ to ‘‘to lay [things] in order,’’ hence ‘‘to gather, pick up,’’ ‘‘torelate,’’ ‘‘to speak purposefully.’’ The name of one venerable and essential typeof ancient and medieval encyclopedia puns on these closely allied verbs: theflorilegium, ‘‘flower-culling’’ (with a pun on ‘‘flower-reading’’), a collection ofsayings, maxims, and stories collected from past works, sometimes quotedexactly (though in mnemonically brief segments), but often just summarized.The best known of these through much of the Middle Ages was ValeriusMaximus’sDicta et facta memorabilia(early first century..), but there aremany other examples. Indeed, the premodern encyclopedia itself is a sort ofmemory-book, the flowers of (one’s extensive) reading gathered up in someorderly arrangement for the purpose of quick, secure recollection in connec-tion with making a new composition. After all, this is one essential purposeof encyclopedias even today.

      This seems awfully close to the sort of "digital gardens" I've been reading about recently. They obviously are not a new idea.

      For example see: https://github.com/MaggieAppleton/digital-gardeners

    3. Re-collection is not passive, but rather an activity involvinghuman will and thought; it is often defined as a form of reasoning. One mayconveniently think of this activity in spatial terms, as if memories have beenstored in a variety of places and must be called together in a common placewhere we can become aware of them, where we can ‘‘see’’ them again andknow them in the present.

      I don't use it frequently (enough perhaps), but TiddlyWiki has the ability to open multiple cards (tiddlers) in one view (using a permalink) as a means of giving disparate small pieces of thought a commonplace. Very few other note taking systems do this without relying on a taxonomy mechanism.

  5. Apr 2020
    1. About LibriVox LibriVox Objective To make all books in the public domain available, for free, in audio format on the internet. Our Fundamental Principles Librivox is a non-commercial, non-profit and ad-free project Librivox donates its recordings to the public domain Librivox is powered by volunteers Librivox maintains a loose and open structure Librivox welcomes all volunteers from across the globe, in all languages
    1. Project Gutenberg is a library of over 60,000 free eBooks. Choose among free epub and Kindle eBooks, download them or read them online. You will find the world's great literature here, with focus on older works for which U.S. copyright has expired. Thousands of volunteers digitized and diligently proofread the eBooks, for enjoyment and education.
    1. The future of eBooks is not in the production of digital photocopies you can read by the pool. The future of eBooks lies in re-imagining the book as an open, easily accessible, immersive experience; a connected community of discovery. Scott Abel The Content Wrangler
    1. Regarding a Hunter S. Thompson book. The reviews on Amazon. One review said to read Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas first before this one inquiry mentions. So noted.

    1. I want to extract a reusable piece out of it in a way that it can be connected to many different things eventually. I want to make a home page for this idea or fact. My hub for thinking about this.

      And isn't this just the point of tools like commonplace books and zettelkasten?

    1. David could be a terror when you got it wrong, but when you got it right—when you wrote something that made him smile—he’d make you feel like you’d hung the moon. I can remember coming to his office after closing a piece on day laborers and him looking at me and saying, “I was just talking about how fucking great your piece was this week.” I was a kid who had never felt like he’d done anything great for anyone. And it was only when working for David that I came to understand that I might actually be “good” (to say nothing of great) at anything. Part of that realization wasn’t just in what David said about my own work, but where he set the bar. David would bring in writers from Vanity Fair to hold workshops with the staff. He’d introduce me to journalists who were doing incredible work. He’d clip articles from the New Yorker or Esquire and leave them on my desk with a note attached: “This is the level of work I expect of you.”
  6. Mar 2020
    1. To have, but maybe not to read. Like Stephen Hawking’s “A Brief History of Time,” “Capital in the Twenty-First Century” seems to have been an “event” book that many buyers didn’t stick with; an analysis of Kindle highlights suggested that the typical reader got through only around 26 of its 700 pages. Still, Piketty was undaunted.

      Interesting use of digital highlights--determining how "read" a particular book is.

    1. Pedro’s book “The Master Algorithm” takes readers on a journey through the five dominant paradigms of machine learning research on a quest for the master  algorithm. Along the way, Pedro wanted to abstract away from the mechanics so that a broad audience, from the CXO to the consumer, can understand how machine learning is shaping our lives

      "The Master Algorithm" book seems to be too abstract in such a case; however, it covers the following 5 paradigms:

      • Rule based learning (Decision trees, Random Forests, etc)
      • Connectivism (neural networks, etc)
      • Bayesian (Naive Bayes, Bayesian Networks, Probabilistic Graphical Models)
      • Analogy (KNN & SVMs)
      • Unsupervised Learning (Clustering, dimensionality reduction, etc)
  7. Feb 2020
    1. Okay this is absolutely blowing up my timeline in the last 24 hrs so I'm gonna bite— *Now brainstorming: 100 opinions on books & reading* (1 like = 1 opinion. Max 100. RT if you'd like some hot takes about antilibraries, bookstores, reading habits & more!)

      Just finished reading this. Some interesting tidbits hiding in it.

  8. Jan 2020
    1. you will find better treatise for all individual topics covered; for example:- What we understand about the brain is essentially covered by Tim Urban in his article "Neuralink and the Brain's Magical Future" in, I might add, more entertaining manner. Alternatively, for a much more in-depth look, look at the book "Principles of Neural Design"- The short time Oliveira spends on superintelligence is better covered by Bostrom in his book "Superintelligence", which Oliveira references- What an algorithm is and what can be computed is better covered by "What algorithms want"- The "common sense" aspect of AI is better covered by "Common Sense, the Turing Test and the Quest for Real AI"- On the title promise, how science is "redefining humanity", the Digital Mind is relatively light on, aside from broadly listing topics that we need to think about like ownership and rights. For a (much) further-taken discussion on this, look at Yuval Noah Harari's Homo Deus, for example.
    1. a private library is not an ego-boosting appendages but a research tool. The library should contain as much of what you do not know as your financial means … allow you to put there. You will accumulate more knowledge and more books as you grow older, and the growing number of unread books on the shelves will look at you menacingly. Indeed, the more you know, the larger the rows of unread books. Let us call this collection of unread books an antilibrary.
  9. Dec 2019
    1. Perhaps if readers were more confident that the majority of the money went to the author, people would feel more guilty about depriving the author of payment. I think most of the filesharing community feels that the record industry is a vestigal organ that will slowly fall off and die – I don’t know to what extent that feeling would extend to publishing houses since they are to some extent a different animal. In the end, I think that regular people will never feel very guilty “stealing” from a faceless corporation, or to a lesser extent, a multi-millionaire like King.
    2. I assume they are primarily produced by individuals like me – bibliophiles who want to share their favorite books with others. They likely own hundreds of books, and when asked what their favorite book is look at you like you are crazy before rattling of 10-15 authors, and then emailing you later with several more. The next time you see them, they have a bag of 5-10 books for you to borrow.
    3. Just because someone downloads a file, it does not mean they would have bought the product I think this is the key fact that many people in the music industry ignore – a download does not translate to a lost sale.
    4. With digital copies, it is more difficult to assign cost. The initial file costs x dollars to create, but you can make a million copies of that file for no cost. Therefore, it is hard to assign a specific value to a digital copy of a work except as it relates to lost sales.
    5. I do not pretend that uploading or downloading unpurchased electronic books is morally correct, but I do think it is more of a grey area than some of your readers may.
  10. www.edwinwenink.xyz www.edwinwenink.xyz
    1. This weblog is a mnemonic device.

      Blogs as digital commonplace books

    1. Delusions of Gender: How Our Minds, Society, and Neurosexism Create Difference is a 2010 book by Cordelia Fine, written to debunk the idea that men and women are hardwired with different interests. The author criticizes claimed evidence of the existence of innate biological differences between men and women's minds as being faulty and exaggerated, and while taking a position of agnosticism with respect to inherent differences relating to interest/skill in 'understanding the world' versus 'understanding people', reviews literature demonstrating how cultural and societal beliefs contribute to sex differences.
    1. Green has built up a stable, useful relationship with the software, mostly opening it to scribble down interesting lines that occur to him, or that are spoken to him, to use later on in his writing.
  11. Nov 2019
    1. In the case of library users, there is a strong tie between technology and library use. For instance, the technology-rich profiles of Information Omnivores might suggest that their gadgets could provide all the media and data they could possibly need—yet they still patronize libraries at high levels.

      I thought this particular detail was rather illuminating. A common belief is that technology will eventually make the library obsolete. Yet, the correlation between high technology use and high library use runs counter to this belief. It is stated later, on page 3, that the highest engagement groups share a love for books, traditional paper books. They also have the highest technology use. To me, this suggests that the library should not disregard, even in the day-and-age of smartphones, their book collection. This is still the primary draw to the library for their high engagement groups and even to medium engagement groups like the Print Traditionalists. I think this is an encouraging note; people still like books and people still like to get books from the library, despite having pocket computers. But, librarians can't disregard technology either. After reading this study, I think the appropriate way for librarians to understand technology is not as a hostile take-over, but similar to how the people of this study found it to be. Technology is an "add on," a supplement to information resources. The library should provide access to books AND a wide array of relevant digital and technology resources.

    1. A personal blog is an online journal, your day to day thoughts published on the web rather than in (or in addition to) a physical notebook. It is an unfinished story, a scratch pad, an outboard brain; and while there are highlights it is more the journey that's the important aspect.

      Colin nibbles around the edges of defining a digital public commonplace book and even the idea of "though spaces" though without tacitly using either phrase.

    1. From this page:

      AUPresses thinks more readers should be aware of the work they’re doing. That’s why during the organization’s annual University Press Week, it launched a reading list it’s calling READ. THINK. ACT., a list of 75 peer-reviewed books designed to help non-academic readers understand the world and work to make it a better place.

  12. Oct 2019
  13. Sep 2019
    1. Goodreads is nearly useless for finding recommendations

      I believe that the point of Goodreads—since Amazon bought the site—is lost here.

      The point of Goodreads is to make people buy books from Amazon. They're capitalists. They don't care about the common good, or about making people find books that they can truly benefit from.

    1. From quill and ink, to the printing press and book formatting, to digital applications and platforms, annotation is - and always has been - tightly coupled to the technologies of the day.

      This makes me wonder at annotations in scrolls (and how pointers may have worked) prior to the invention and proliferation of codices as a literary form.

  14. Aug 2019
    1. Research. As zero-textbook-cost degrees are implemented across the country, research could be conducted to analyze the impact of degree establishment on student access and success, as well as on faculty pedagogical practice. Metrics related to access and success might include credit loads, withdrawal rates, persistence rates, pass rates, and actual cost savings.

      Zero-textbook cost degrees is still a long way off as far as India goes. Our students are now extremely proficient in the use of the internet and open sources. However, compared to open access resources use of standardised textbooks in traditionnal classrooms is definitely better as teachers has a personal connect with the student. This is particularly necessary as students are becoming victims of PUBG and other such addctive games leading to either suicide or other behavioural problems. We do not need a plethora of zombie students in our schools and colleges!

    1. Following his abdication in 2004, Norodom Sihanouk, the former King of Cambodia, began to share his remarks in a rather creative way. Sihanouk established a website which, despite his passing in 2012, remains updated and well-organized to this day.7http://norodomsihanouk.info The archive includes selections of Sihanouk’s personal correspondences, handwritten recipes, musical compositions, and film commentary. It also includes many annotated newspaper and magazine articles.

      This sounds to me like a version of a commonplace book, but given the date, likely one of the first explicitly done online.

  15. Jul 2019
    1. Kahle has been critical of Google's book digitization, especially of Google's exclusivity in restricting other search engines' digital access to the books they archive. In a 2011 talk Kahle described Google's 'snippet' feature as a means of tip-toeing around copyright issues, and expressed his frustration with the lack of a decent loaning system for digital materials. He said the digital transition has moved from local control to central control, non-profit to for-profit, diverse to homogeneous, and from "ruled by law" to "ruled by contract". Kahle stated that even public-domain material published before 1923, and not bound by copyright law, is still bound by Google's contracts and requires permission to be distributed or copied. Kahle reasoned that this trend has emerged for a number of reasons: distribution of information favoring centralization, the economic cost of digitizing books, the issue of library staff without the technical knowledge to build these services, and the decision of the administrators to outsource information services
    1. The position of machine products in the civilized scheme of consumption serves to point out the nature of the relation which subsists between the canon of conspicuous waste and the code of proprieties in consumption. Neither in matters of art and taste proper, nor as regards the current sense of the serviceability of goods, does this canon act as a principle of innovation or initiative. It does not go into the future as a creative principle which makes innovations and adds new items of consumption and new elements of cost. The principle in question is, in a certain sense, a negative rather than a positive law. It is a regulative rather than a creative principle. It very rarely initiates or originates any usage or custom directly. Its action is selective only. Conspicuous wastefulness does not directly afford ground for variation and growth, but conformity to its requirements is a condition to the survival of such innovations as may be made on other grounds. In whatever way usages and customs and methods of expenditure arise, they are all subject to the selective action of this norm of reputability; and the degree in which they conform to its requirements is a test of their fitness to survive in the competition with other similar usages and customs.
    1. To understand what has happened, we only need to look at the history of writing and printing to note two very different consequences (a) the first, a vast change over the last 450 years in how the physical and social worlds are dealt with via the inventions of modern science and governance, and (b) that most people who read at all still mostly read fiction, self-help and religion books, and cookbooks, etc.* (all topics that would be familiar to any cave-person).
    1. Europe’s oldest intact book has been discovered after being closed inside a hermit monk’s coffin for over 400 years. It will go on display at the British Library as part of an exhibition featuring prized manuscripts like the Lindisfarne Gospels and Beowulf. The show is a once in a lifetime opportunity to see how medieval Anglo-Saxons depicted their own culture through early writings.

      Excited that I got to see the exhibition!

  16. May 2019
    1. Twenty Stories Bookmobile, which left L.A. traffic for Providence, Rhode Island, in 2018

      This makes me think that a mobile bookstore a la the traditional LA roach coach with a well painted/decorated exterior could be a cool thing.

      I'm reminded of a used bookstore pop-up I saw recently at the Santa Anita Mall prior to the holidays. Booksellers were traditionally itinerant mongers anyway. Perhaps this could be a more solid model, especially for the lunchtime business crowds.

  17. Apr 2019
    1. NCERT books are the best and popular resources for the students who are serious about their career and studies and willing to prepare for the entry level exams. It is the most demand able and easiest way to improve your progress.

      NCERT Books is the must recommended books for Civil Services Examination Preparation!

    1. technology companies have made it work that way. Ebook stores from Amazon, Apple, Google, Kobo, Barnes and Noble all follow broadly the same rules. You’re buying a licence to read, not a licence to own.

      Bear in mind that this "ownership" is common practice with Amazon, Apple, Google, Kobo, Barnes and Noble, and other ones as well.

      It's not this way with non-DRM books, that you can download, and reuse as with physical books.

    2. There’s bad news for users of Microsoft’s eBook store: the company is closing it down, and, with it, any books bought through the service will no longer be readable.To soften the blow, the company has promised to refund any customers who bought books through the store (a clue that there may not have been that many of them, hence the closure. Microsoft did not offer further comment).

      How about this for posterity and owning what you buy?

  18. Mar 2019
  19. Feb 2019
    1. How do you manage information flows? If anyone is using a personal wiki-style long term information tool I’d love to hear from you!

      I've got a handful of interesting things bookmarked here: https://boffosocko.com/tag/wikis/ which includes a rabbit hole of a request similar to your own.

    1. Catch up by reading my last post of digital streams, campfires and gardens.

      I immediately thought of a post from Mike Caulfield (Hapgood). Interesting to see that Tom has already read and referenced it in his prior post.

  20. Jan 2019
    1. Isaacson pointed out that more than 7,000 pages from Da Vinci’s notebooks survived to today–a stretch of 500 years. He asked how many of our tweets and Facebook posts will survive even 50 years. Paper, it turns out, is a durable medium of information storage.
  21. Dec 2018
    1. "The blog serves as a kind of steam valve for me," he says. "I put stuff out there that I'm forming an opinion about, and another blogger starts arguing with me and giving me feedback, and I haven't even finished what I was posting!"

      An early written incarnation of the idea of blogs as "thought spaces".

    1. Margaret Atwood

      Atwood is definitely one of my favorite authors. I do love The Handmaid's Tale and the MaddAddam trilogy, but my favorites of hers are where she explores women and their relationships with each other, namely The Robber Bride and Cat's Eye. Her Stone Mattress short story collection is incredible as well.

  22. Nov 2018
    1. The main thing that dissuaded him, he says, is that “I wouldn’t want to sell a book to a philistine, which is what every bookseller has to do.”
    2. Jean Prévost’s “La Première Partie des Subtiles et Plaisantes Inventions,” the earliest known important conjuring book, printed in Lyons in 1584.
  23. app.getpocket.com app.getpocket.com
    1. Jean Prévost’s “La Première Partie des Subtiles et Plaisantes Inventions,” the earliest known important conjuring book, printed in Lyons in 1584.
    1. Nigel Travis, who is the Executive Chairman of the Board for Dunkin’ Brands. He has an exercise that he calls “define your demise” (he describes this in his book, The Challenge Culture: Why the Most Successful Organizations Run on Pushback).

      Important to define why and how the company could fail. Provides insight into weaknesses and how to overcome some of them.

      Book is by Chairman of the board for Dunkin' brands.

  24. Oct 2018
    1. I uncovered the miracle of the bright cross, as I found it in books

      Cynewulf—and we—also discover the cross, thru books

  25. Sep 2018
    1. Classics Book Club

      If you are interested in reading Classic books you can join r/ClassicsBookClub on reddit where we will be hosting groups reads and discussions.

  26. Sep 2017
  27. Aug 2017
    1. without downloading or reading them.

      This is cool but the "reading of them" is the more radical proposition.

    2. Many of the university’s holdings “were invisible to the world,” Coleman says. Google’s involvement promised to change that.

      An important point for those who might immediately dismiss anything Google-related.

    3. “It’s hard to imagine going through a day doing the work we academics do without touching something that wouldn’t be there without Google Book Search,”

      But this is a statement that would align with Somer's lament above, no?

    4. a persistent cultural challenge: how to balance copyright and fair use and keep everybody—authors, publishers, scholars, librarians—satisfied. That work still lies ahead.

      I'll be very interested to see how this gets negotiated moving forward.

  28. Jul 2017
    1. Avid lovers of books and nature, they conspired to marry the two in a vast library woven into the Western landscape — a literary refuge where patrons could spend the night among the books, attend lectures and maybe catch a trout.

      Sounds cool, and I don't even like the outdoors...

  29. Jun 2017
    1. literature became data

      Doesn't this obfuscate the process? Literature became digital. Digital enables a wide range of futther activity to take place on top of literature, including, perhaps, it's datafication.

  30. Apr 2017
  31. Mar 2017
    1. Furthermore, the results could focus on drawing the user into the virtual app space (immersive) or could use the portable nature of tablet to extend the experience into the physical space inhabited by the user (something I have called ’emersive’). Generative (emersive) Books that project coloured ambient light and/or audio into a darkened space Generative (immersive) Books that display abstracted video/audio from cameras/microphone, collaged or augmented with pre-designed content Books that contain location specific content from the internet combined with pre-authored/designed content

      Estas líneas y las siguientes definen un conjunto interesante de posibilidades para las publicaciones digitales. ¿Cómo podemos hacerles Bootstrap desde lo que ya tenemos? (ejp: Grafoscopio y el Data Week).

  32. Feb 2017
    1. English professors, because literature provided teachable content, something to write about other limn oneself or arbitrarily chosen subjects in which the teacher was not an expert.

      Side note: would the Great Books theory include books of composition instruction like Strunk & White's Elements of Style or any of the books Nathaniel passed out on Thursday?

    1. but this edu-cation did not include classical learning, literacy in Greek and Latin, or formal training in rhetoric, except in a few elite schools for boys destined for the univer-sity

      I do wonder what the reasoning was for this (I mean, besides the blatant "women and the lower class are too stupid to understand our Great Books and/or will lead lives that do not require a 'polite' education"). We've already read arguments that the "polite" education supposedly improved the virtues as well as the mind, right? Wouldn't all of society benefit if women and the lower class were virtuous, as much as possible?

  33. Jan 2017
    1. But allow him to acquire experience in those objects, his feeling becomes more exact and nice: He not only perceives the beauties and defects of each part, but marks the distinguishing species of each quality, and assigns it suitable praise or blame.

      Sounds a lot like the Great Books theory–simple exposure to good art will yield a good critic.

  34. Oct 2016
    1. Books mentioned throughout this comment thread. Add your suggestions! - de Mesquita and Smith's The Dictator's Handbook - Machiavelli's The Prince - Sun Tzu's the Art of War - Saul Alinski's Rules for Radicals - David Nickle's Eutopia - Jared Diamond's Guns, Germs, and Steel (as per a previous CGPGrey video) - Erica Chenoweth's Why civil resistance works
  35. Sep 2016
    1. The morning weighs on my shoulders with the dreadful weight of hope an4 I take the blue envelope which Jacques has sent me and tear it sl6wly into many pieces, watching them . .. . I dance in the wind, watchiμg the wind carry them away. Yet, as I turn and begin walking tovyard the waiting people, the wind blows some of them back on me. ]

      Reading this last paragraph, it seems that not even David knows what will happen next in his life. The idea of having hope that something positive will happen in his life now. Or Giovanni won't be executed is weighing him down because even he knows that isn't realistic. Since the ending is so ambiguous I personally took David tearing the envelope Jacques sent him slowly as him trying to start over, but when he threw it in the wind as he was walking away the wind blows it back to him. Making me believe that even though he wants to start over and forget what has happened he won't be able to move forward because something in his past will keep bringing him down. I also believe that the reason why Baldwin made the ending so ambiguous is because during that time maybe he didn’t know what to do next or how to move on. It was said that Giovanni’s room was based off of actual events that happened to Baldwin before he starting writing this book. Baldwin was in a love affair with a man named Lucien Happersberger who ended up marrying a women and that’s why the book is dedicated to Lucien.

      I tagged an article where Baldwin talks about Giovanni's Room and what it means to him as well as a very short clip of an interview with Baldwin.

  36. May 2016
    1. "Historic trove of documents discovered in city attic," Herald.ie (2016-05-16) http://www.herald.ie/news/historic-trove-of-documents-discovered-in-city-attic-34707155.html

      The four missing volumes of Prisoner Books listing the arrests of more than 30,000 people between 1905 and 1918 include the "crimes" of labour leaders Jim Larkin (seditious conspiracy), James Connolly (incitement to crime), revolutionary Maud Gonne MacBride (defence of the realm), and suffragette Hanna Sheehy-Skeffington (glass-breaking with other suffragettes).

    2. "Thousands of files containing details of prisoners arrested during 1913 Lockout, Easter Rising published online," RTÉ Six-One News (2016-05-11) [flash video]

      http://www.rte.ie/news/player/2016/0511/20986024-thousands-of-files-containing-details-of-prisoners-arrested-during-1913-lockout-easter-rising-published-online/

      RTÉ Six-One News report on the restoration of DMP Prisoners Books to the Garda Museum and Archives, and launch of the four digitised volumes of Dublin Metropolitan Police prisoner books from the Irish revolutionary period.

    3. "UCD Library Cultural Heritage: Launch of the Dublin Metropolitan Police Prisoners Books." Flickr (2015-05-11)

      Flickr album of photographs from the SPITU-sponsored launch of the digital DMP Prisoners Books at Liberty Hall, Dublin.

    4. "SIPTU presents historic DMP files to Garda and to UCD online library" (2016-05-11) http://www.siptu.ie/media/pressreleases2016/featurednews/fullstory_19808_en.html

      SIPTU presented ‘Prisoners Books’ concerning over 30,000 people arrested by the Dublin Metropolitan Police (DMP) between 1905 and 1918 to the Garda Síochána at a ceremony in Liberty Hall, Dublin, this morning (11th May).

    5. PULSE, 1916. http://www.broadsheet.ie/2016/05/11/fingers-on-the-pulse-of-1916/

      The Dublin Metropolitan Police (DMP) Prisoners Books for 1905-1908 and 1911-1918 are amongst the most valuable new documents to come to light on the revolutionary decade.

      They include important information on social and political life in the capital during the last years of the Union, from the period of widespread anticipation of Home Rule, to the advent of the 1913 Lockout, the outbreak of the First World War in 1914, the Easter Rising and its aftermath in 1916, and including the conscription crisis of 1918.

      They will also be invaluable to those interested in criminology, genealogy, and family history.

      The collection comprises of four large leather bound, double ledger volumes containing hand written entries that record the details of daily charge sheets issued by DMP members to offenders or alleged offenders.

      Each volume contains the name, age, address, occupation, alleged offence and, in most cases, outcome of cases involving over 30,000 people arrested by the DMP.

      Each volume also contains an index of prisoners with references to the pages containing details of the charge. The information in these volumes serves, therefore, to provide new perspectives on life in Dublin during a time of war and revolution.

    6. Dublin Metropolitan Police's Prisoners Books released," Irish Geneology News (2016-05-12) http://www.irishgenealogynews.com/2016/05/dublin-metropolitan-polices-prisoners.html

      Launched yesterday at Liberty Hall, these records date from Ireland's revolutionary era and include all manner of crimes listed in register pages headed 'Prisoners charged with offences involving dishonesty'. ...

    7. "Dublin Metropolitan Police Prisoner Books 1905-1918," The British GENES blog (2016-05-12) http://britishgenes.blogspot.ie/2016/05/dublin-metropolitan-police-prisoner.html

      University College Dublin's Digital Library (http://digital.ucd.ie) has just uploaded digitised editions of four Dublin Metropolitan Police prisoners books from 1905-1908, and 1911-1918, at http://digital.ucd.ie/view/ucdlib:43945.

    8. "Historic police records showing Connolly and Larkin arrests found in skip," Irish Independent (2016-05-11) http://www.independent.ie/irish-news/historic-police-records-showing-connolly-and-larkin-arrests-found-in-skip-34707471.html

      The four missing volumes of 'Prisoner Books' listing the arrests of more than 30,000 people between 1905 and 1918 include the "crimes" of labour leaders Jim Larkin (seditious conspiracy), James Connolly (incitement to crime), revolutionary Maud Gonne MacBride (defence of the realm) and suffragette Hanna Sheehy Skeffington, (glass-breaking with other suffragettes).

    9. "Records of 1916 Rising arrests published online," Irish Examiner (2016-05-12)

      Reports containing details of 30,000 arrests by the Dublin Metropolitan Police more than 100 years ago have been published online, writes Dan Buckley.

      They contain details of prisoners during the Lockout of 1913, the outbreak of the First World War and the 1916 Easter Rising.

  37. Apr 2016
  38. Mar 2016
    1. The original source of Alfred E. Neuman's face was probably a poster for a popular 1894 stage comedy called The New Boy.

  39. Jan 2016
    1. Top 30 books ranked by total number of links to Amazon in Hacker News comments "The Rent Is Too Damn High: What To Do About It, And Why It Matters More Than You Think" by Matthew Yglesias Publisher: Simon & Schuster Click for details"The Four Steps to the Epiphany: Successful Strategies for Products that Win" by Steven Gary Blank Publisher: Cafepress.com Click for details"Introduction to Algorithms, 3rd Edition" by Thomas H. Cormen Publisher: The MIT Press Click for details"Influence: The Psychology of Persuasion, Revised Edition" by Robert B. Cialdini Publisher: Harper Business Click for details"Peopleware: Productive Projects and Teams (Second Edition)" by Visit Amazon's Tom DeMarco Page Publisher: Dorset House Publishing Company, Incorporated Click for details"Code: The Hidden Language of Computer Hardware and Software" by Charles Petzold Publisher: Microsoft Press Click for details"Working Effectively with Legacy Code" by Michael Feathers Publisher: Prentice Hall Click for details"Three Felonies A Day: How the Feds Target the Innocent" by Harvey Silverglate Publisher: Encounter Books Click for details"JavaScript: The Good Parts" by Douglas Crockford Publisher: O'Reilly Media Click for details"The Little Schemer - 4th Edition" by Daniel P. Friedman Publisher: The MIT Press Click for details"The E-Myth Revisited: Why Most Small Businesses Don't Work and What to Do About It" by Michael E. Gerber Publisher: HarperCollins Click for details"Feeling Good: The New Mood Therapy" by David D. Burns Publisher: Harper Click for details"Programming Collective Intelligence: Building Smart Web 2.0 Applications" by Toby Segaran Publisher: O'Reilly Media Click for details"The Non-Designer's Design Book (3rd Edition)" by Robin Williams Publisher: Peachpit Press Click for details"The C Programming Language" by Brian W. Kernighan Publisher: Prentice Hall Click for details"The Design of Everyday Things" by Donald A. Norman Publisher: Basic Books Click for details"Cracking the Coding Interview: 150 Programming Questions and Solutions" by Gayle Laakmann McDowell Publisher: CareerCup Click for details"What Intelligence Tests Miss: The Psychology of Rational Thought" by Keith E. Stanovich Publisher: Yale University Press Click for details"On Writing Well, 30th Anniversary Edition: The Classic Guide to Writing Nonfiction" by William Zinsser Publisher: Harper Perennial Click for details"Darwin's Theorem" by TJ Radcliffe Publisher: Siduri Press Click for details"Knowing and Teaching Elementary Mathematics: Teachers' Understanding of Fundamental Mathematics in China and the United States (Studies in Mathematical Thinking and Learning Series)" by Liping Ma Publisher: Routledge Click for details"Don't Make Me Think: A Common Sense Approach to Web Usability, 2nd Edition" by Steve Krug Publisher: New Riders Click for details"Expert C Programming: Deep C Secrets" by Peter van der Linden Publisher: Prentice Hall Click for details"Clean Code: A Handbook of Agile Software Craftsmanship" by Robert C. Martin Publisher: Prentice Hall Click for details"The Elements of Computing Systems: Building a Modern Computer from First Principles" by Noam Nisan Publisher: The MIT Press Click for details"Code Complete: A Practical Handbook of Software Construction, Second Edition" by Steve McConnell Publisher: Microsoft Press Click for details"The Box: How the Shipping Container Made the World Smaller and the World Economy Bigger" by Marc Levinson Publisher: Princeton University Press Click for details"Software Estimation: Demystifying the Black Art (Developer Best Practices)" by Steve McConnell Publisher: Microsoft Press Click for details"Refactoring: Improving the Design of Existing Code" by Martin Fowler Publisher: Addison-Wesley Professional Click for details"Design for Hackers: Reverse Engineering Beauty" by David Kadavy Publisher: Wiley Click for details

      Top 30 books ranked by total number of links to Amazon in Hacker News comments

  40. Oct 2015
  41. Sep 2015
    1. ibrary to easily add annotation functionality to any webpage. Annotations can

      This is a test. Library

    1. to prove this, let facts be submitted to a candid world, for the truth of which we pledge a faith yet unsullied by falsehood.

      The Declaration of Independence impacted the United States in more ways than one, Jefferson makes clear when he states "to prove this, let facts be submitted to a candid world;" he is referring to the reign of the King of Great Britain who has brought injuries and tyranny over the states. He wants his people to realize the corruption and wrongdoings that the king has caused. Jefferson is essentially saying that people should be uncorrupt in this new world and man should strive to preserve the pureness of this country keeping it from falsehood and injustice. It sparked my attention when I came across a newspaper titled "The North Briton" written by J. Wilkes and others which contained very similar diction and ideals of society during that time period. Wilkes is criticizing King George III for his speech in favor of the Treaty of Paris ending the Seven Year’s War; he states “Articles 15 is for having corrupted the sacred fountain of truth and put falsehoods into the mouth of Majesty, in several speeches made in parliament.” Wilkes is trying to uncover the king’s corruption and bring to light that he is lying to his people which ties closely to Jefferson’s actions and morals of being uncorrupt. Most people carried similar beliefs in the United States during the 18th century, it is very possible that the Wilkes could have been from Jefferson's era carrying the same ideals and values as him due to similar style of writing, choice of diction, and beliefs.

    1. let facts be submitted to a candid world, for the truth of which we pledge a faith yet unsullied by falsehood.

      The Declaration of Independence impacted the United States in more ways than one, Jefferson makes clear that essentially people should be uncorrupt in this new world and man should strive to preserve the pureness of this country and keep from falsehood and lies. It sparked my attention when I came across a monthly chronologer titled "The Gentleman's and London magazine" that contained very similar diction and ideals of society during that time period. It is noticed that humans are habitual creatures and mimic their peers within their society creating a universal diction within that community. Most people carried similar beliefs in the United States during the 18th century since most citizens were of Christian faith it is very possible that the writers of the "Gentleman's and London Magazine" could have been from Jefferson's era having the same ideals and values as him due to similar style of writing and choice of diction.

    1. Should you wish to learn more about the language, I am happy to recommend the following titles: JavaScript: The Definitive Guide by David Flanagan Eloquent JavaScript by Marijn Haverbeke JavaScript Patterns by Stoyan Stefanov Writing Maintainable JavaScript by Nicholas Zakas JavaScript: The Good Parts by Douglas Crockford
  42. Jul 2015
    1. Sec. 15-7. - Injuring or defacing library property. Whoever willfully injures or defaces any book, newspaper, magazine, pamphlet, manuscript, or other property belonging to the city library by writing, marking, tearing, breaking, or otherwise mutilating shall be fined as provided in section 1-8. (Code 1964, amended, § 19.19(A)) Cross reference— Damage to public property, § 17-26. State Law reference— Criminal mischief, V.A.P.C. § 28.03; reckless damage of property, § 28.04.
  43. Mar 2015
  44. Nov 2014
    1. Apropos gemeinsames Nachdenken: Wir glauben, dass verhärtete Fronten generell keine gute Idee sind und dass die gegensätzlichen Pole von technikfeindlichen Ebook-Verächtern auf der einen und den sämtliche Verlagsmauern niederreißenden Digitaljüngern auf der anderen Seite zugespitzt und konstruiert sind. Verlage und Papierbücher (vor allem die sorgsam gestalteten und hergestellten) wird es glücklicherweise noch sehr, sehr lange geben, genau wie spannende Digitalveröffentlichungen.

      Im Blog des Projektes Fu-PusH nimmt Ben Kaden auf diese Passage Bezug und reflektiert die angesprochene Polarisierung hinsichtlich der Publikationspraxis in den Geisteswissenschaften: Warum der allgemeine E-Book-Markt für Fu-PusH relevant ist.

    1. Full Text Beginning Perl Modern Perl Impatient Perl Extreme