28 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
  2. Nov 2022
  3. 6291320.fs1.hubspotusercontent-na1.net 6291320.fs1.hubspotusercontent-na1.net
    1. We find favorwith Mortimer J. Adler’s stance, from 1940,that “marking up a book is not an act ofmutilation but of love.”18

      also:

      Full ownership of a book only comes when you have made it a part of yourself, and the best way to make yourself a part of it—which comes to the same thing—is by writing in it. —Adler, Mortimer J., and Charles Van Doren. How to Read a Book. Revised and Updated edition. 1940. Reprint, New York: Simon & Schuster, 1972.

      They also suggest that due to the relative low cost of books, it's easier to justify writing in them, though they carve out an exception for the barbarism of scribbling in library books.

  4. Aug 2022
    1. The narrator considers this as vandalism and finds it hard to believe how anyone "educated enough to have access to a university library should do this to a book." To him "the treatment of books is a test of civilized behaviour."

      Highlighted portion is a quote from Kuehn sub-quoting David Lodge, Deaf Sentence (New York: Viking 2008)

      Ownership is certainly a factor here, but given how inexpensive many books are now, if you own it, why not mark it up? See also: Mortimer J. Adler's position on this.


      Marking up library books is a barbarism; not marking up your own books is a worse sin.

  5. Jun 2022
    1. Thus began a lifelong relationship with her commonplace books.Butler would scrape together twenty-five cents to buy small Meadmemo pads, and in those pages she took notes on every aspect ofher life: grocery and clothes shopping lists, last-minute to-dos,wishes and intentions, and calculations of her remaining funds forrent, food, and utilities. She meticulously tracked her daily writinggoals and page counts, lists of her failings and desired personalqualities, her wishes and dreams for the future, and contracts she

      would sign with herself each day for how many words she committed to write.

      Not really enough evidence for a solid quote here. What was his source?

      He cites the following shallowly: <br /> - Octavia E. Butler, Bloodchild and Other Stories: Positive Obsession (New York: Seven Stories, 2005), 123–36.<br /> - 2 Lynell George, A Handful of Earth, A Handful of Sky: The World of Octavia Butler (Santa Monica: Angel City Press, 2020).<br /> - 3 Dan Sheehan, “Octavia Butler has finally made the New York Times Best Seller list,” LitHub.com, September 3, 2020, https://lithub.com/octavia- butler-has-finally-made-the-new-york-times-best-seller-list/.<br /> - 4 Butler’s archive has been available to researchers and scholars at the Huntington Library since 2010.

  6. Feb 2022
    1. Indeed, the Jose-phinian card index owes its continued use to the failure to achieve a bound

      catalog, until a successor card catalog comes along in 1848. Only the<br /> absence of a bound repertory allows the paper slip aggregate to answer all inquiries about a book ’ s whereabouts after 1781. Thus, a failed undertaking tacitly turns into a success story.

      The Josephinian card index was created, in part on the ideas of Konrad Gessner's slip method, by accumulating slips which could be rearranged and then copied down permanently. While there was the chance that the original cards could be disordered, the fact that the approximately 300,000 cards in 205 small boxes were estimated to fill 50 to 60 folio volumes with time and expense to print it dissuaded the creation of a long desired compiled book of books. These problems along with the fact that new books being added later was sure to only compound problems of having a single reference. This failure to have a bound catalog of books unwittingly resulted in the success of the index card catalog.

  7. Jul 2021
    1. Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz (1646-1716), der nicht nur angesehener Mathematiker und Philosoph war, sondern auch Bibliothekar der Herzog August Bibliothek in Wolfenbüttel, soll sich eigens einen Karteischrank als Büchermöbel nach eigenen Vorstellungen haben bauen lassen.

      Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz (1646-1716), who was not only a respected mathematician and philosopher, but also librarian at the Herzog August Library in Wolfenbüttel, is said to have had a filing cabinet built for him as book furniture according to his own ideas.

      I'm curious to hear more about what this custom library furniture looked like? Could it have been the precursor to the modern-day filing cabinet?

      I can picture something like the recent photo I saw of Bob Hope amidst his commonplace book.

    1. The Joke File has been scanned into an internal database that is accessible on-site in both the Recorded Sound and Moving Image Research Centers.

      Bob Hope's commonplace book of jokes has been scanned digitally and available at the United States Library of Congress.

  8. Apr 2020
    1. About LibriVox LibriVox Objective To make all books in the public domain available, for free, in audio format on the internet. Our Fundamental Principles Librivox is a non-commercial, non-profit and ad-free project Librivox donates its recordings to the public domain Librivox is powered by volunteers Librivox maintains a loose and open structure Librivox welcomes all volunteers from across the globe, in all languages
    1. Project Gutenberg is a library of over 60,000 free eBooks. Choose among free epub and Kindle eBooks, download them or read them online. You will find the world's great literature here, with focus on older works for which U.S. copyright has expired. Thousands of volunteers digitized and diligently proofread the eBooks, for enjoyment and education.
    1. The future of eBooks is not in the production of digital photocopies you can read by the pool. The future of eBooks lies in re-imagining the book as an open, easily accessible, immersive experience; a connected community of discovery. Scott Abel The Content Wrangler
  9. Mar 2020
  10. Jan 2020
    1. a private library is not an ego-boosting appendages but a research tool. The library should contain as much of what you do not know as your financial means … allow you to put there. You will accumulate more knowledge and more books as you grow older, and the growing number of unread books on the shelves will look at you menacingly. Indeed, the more you know, the larger the rows of unread books. Let us call this collection of unread books an antilibrary.
  11. May 2016
    1. "Historic trove of documents discovered in city attic," Herald.ie (2016-05-16) http://www.herald.ie/news/historic-trove-of-documents-discovered-in-city-attic-34707155.html

      The four missing volumes of Prisoner Books listing the arrests of more than 30,000 people between 1905 and 1918 include the "crimes" of labour leaders Jim Larkin (seditious conspiracy), James Connolly (incitement to crime), revolutionary Maud Gonne MacBride (defence of the realm), and suffragette Hanna Sheehy-Skeffington (glass-breaking with other suffragettes).

    2. "Thousands of files containing details of prisoners arrested during 1913 Lockout, Easter Rising published online," RTÉ Six-One News (2016-05-11) [flash video]

      http://www.rte.ie/news/player/2016/0511/20986024-thousands-of-files-containing-details-of-prisoners-arrested-during-1913-lockout-easter-rising-published-online/

      RTÉ Six-One News report on the restoration of DMP Prisoners Books to the Garda Museum and Archives, and launch of the four digitised volumes of Dublin Metropolitan Police prisoner books from the Irish revolutionary period.

    3. "UCD Library Cultural Heritage: Launch of the Dublin Metropolitan Police Prisoners Books." Flickr (2015-05-11)

      Flickr album of photographs from the SPITU-sponsored launch of the digital DMP Prisoners Books at Liberty Hall, Dublin.

    4. "SIPTU presents historic DMP files to Garda and to UCD online library" (2016-05-11) http://www.siptu.ie/media/pressreleases2016/featurednews/fullstory_19808_en.html

      SIPTU presented ‘Prisoners Books’ concerning over 30,000 people arrested by the Dublin Metropolitan Police (DMP) between 1905 and 1918 to the Garda Síochána at a ceremony in Liberty Hall, Dublin, this morning (11th May).

    5. PULSE, 1916. http://www.broadsheet.ie/2016/05/11/fingers-on-the-pulse-of-1916/

      The Dublin Metropolitan Police (DMP) Prisoners Books for 1905-1908 and 1911-1918 are amongst the most valuable new documents to come to light on the revolutionary decade.

      They include important information on social and political life in the capital during the last years of the Union, from the period of widespread anticipation of Home Rule, to the advent of the 1913 Lockout, the outbreak of the First World War in 1914, the Easter Rising and its aftermath in 1916, and including the conscription crisis of 1918.

      They will also be invaluable to those interested in criminology, genealogy, and family history.

      The collection comprises of four large leather bound, double ledger volumes containing hand written entries that record the details of daily charge sheets issued by DMP members to offenders or alleged offenders.

      Each volume contains the name, age, address, occupation, alleged offence and, in most cases, outcome of cases involving over 30,000 people arrested by the DMP.

      Each volume also contains an index of prisoners with references to the pages containing details of the charge. The information in these volumes serves, therefore, to provide new perspectives on life in Dublin during a time of war and revolution.

    6. Dublin Metropolitan Police's Prisoners Books released," Irish Geneology News (2016-05-12) http://www.irishgenealogynews.com/2016/05/dublin-metropolitan-polices-prisoners.html

      Launched yesterday at Liberty Hall, these records date from Ireland's revolutionary era and include all manner of crimes listed in register pages headed 'Prisoners charged with offences involving dishonesty'. ...

    7. "Dublin Metropolitan Police Prisoner Books 1905-1918," The British GENES blog (2016-05-12) http://britishgenes.blogspot.ie/2016/05/dublin-metropolitan-police-prisoner.html

      University College Dublin's Digital Library (http://digital.ucd.ie) has just uploaded digitised editions of four Dublin Metropolitan Police prisoners books from 1905-1908, and 1911-1918, at http://digital.ucd.ie/view/ucdlib:43945.

    8. "Historic police records showing Connolly and Larkin arrests found in skip," Irish Independent (2016-05-11) http://www.independent.ie/irish-news/historic-police-records-showing-connolly-and-larkin-arrests-found-in-skip-34707471.html

      The four missing volumes of 'Prisoner Books' listing the arrests of more than 30,000 people between 1905 and 1918 include the "crimes" of labour leaders Jim Larkin (seditious conspiracy), James Connolly (incitement to crime), revolutionary Maud Gonne MacBride (defence of the realm) and suffragette Hanna Sheehy Skeffington, (glass-breaking with other suffragettes).

    9. "Records of 1916 Rising arrests published online," Irish Examiner (2016-05-12)

      Reports containing details of 30,000 arrests by the Dublin Metropolitan Police more than 100 years ago have been published online, writes Dan Buckley.

      They contain details of prisoners during the Lockout of 1913, the outbreak of the First World War and the 1916 Easter Rising.

  12. Sep 2015
    1. ibrary to easily add annotation functionality to any webpage. Annotations can

      This is a test. Library

  13. Jul 2015
    1. Sec. 15-7. - Injuring or defacing library property. Whoever willfully injures or defaces any book, newspaper, magazine, pamphlet, manuscript, or other property belonging to the city library by writing, marking, tearing, breaking, or otherwise mutilating shall be fined as provided in section 1-8. (Code 1964, amended, § 19.19(A)) Cross reference— Damage to public property, § 17-26. State Law reference— Criminal mischief, V.A.P.C. § 28.03; reckless damage of property, § 28.04.