14 Matching Annotations
  1. Mar 2020
    1. https://guides.library.utoronto.ca/c.php?g=448614&p=3199145

      Librarians are masters at finding material and checking copyright. This is what we do and what we've done for years but most of us really don't have an understanding of what is OER and how it can be used. As librarians continue to be in forefront of this movement, we need to be educated with language we understand so we can interpret it to those we serve. This source gives an indepth interpretation in librarian-understandable language

  2. Oct 2019
    1. 12 contact hours shall be equivalent to the number of clock hours that would be necessary to provide full reassigned time to a faculty counselor or a faculty librarian for 15 weeks

      With a 35-hour work week, 12 contact hours works out to 525 hours of reassigned time for junior faculty librarians. If hired before Fall 2020, receive 1050 hours over the first 5 years. After Fall 2020, would receive 787.5 hours to be used in first 5 years, then 262.5 over first 3 post-tenure years.

    2. It is understood that stipends will be awarded for projects that are not part of the faculty member’s normal workload or responsibilities

      How would this work for faculty appointed in the libraries, who work a 35-hour week? Is it a form of reassigned time? Overtime? Thinking...

  3. May 2019
  4. Jun 2018
    1. as many libraries begin to function as publishers themselves, it would be interesting to see discussion around how they fit into the existing publishing ecosystem.

      Involve LPC more! I'd love to help!

  5. Oct 2017
    1. How library collections budgets work By Library Loon 27 October 2017 Library as organization, Scholarly communication 3 Comments “Why can’t open-access initiatives get some of that sweet, sweet library budget money?” the Loon was asked (well, entitledly whinged at, but it comes to much the same thing). Short answer: The librarians in charge of allocating collections money have no incentive to support open access, and the librarians (supposedly) in charge of changing scholarly communication have either zero budget or strictly-earmarked budgets that do not permit this use. QED.

      This is a great article on the structure of library budgets. I think one of the most interesting reflections is that the creation of buying consortia is a response to the structure of scholarly publishing, so the two kind of fit hand in glove. Moving away from that structure is going to be very challenging.

  6. Sep 2017
    1. I guess the big take away for me is that what I have heard from our community compels me to try to shift my focus from satisfying immediate user needs by continually improving the tools at hand to making progress and supporting progress towards a discovery environment we can’t yet imagine (because most of us are not Muriel Cooper) but which provides fun, intuitive, maybe immersive opportunities for discovery.

      I am interested in this sentiment, and how I might support it through our work at SAGE.

    2. connections

      Connections is the key thing, in a world of information abundance. How do we trust those connections, understand them, and act on them?

  7. Jul 2017
  8. Mar 2017
    1. librarians can do more to promote information literacy.

      But they should do that also.

    2. Librarians are gearing up for a “marathon” effort to preserve federal funding for libraries, research, the arts and the humanities.

      You can count on librarians to get involved.

  9. Jun 2016
    1. If the RRID is well-formed, and if the lookup found the right record, a human validator tags it a valid RRID — one that can now be associated mechanically with occurrences of the same resource in other contexts. If the RRID is not well-formed, or if the lookup fails to find the right record, a human validator tags the annotation as an exception and can discuss with others how to handle it. If an RRID is just missing, the validator notes that with another kind of exception tag.

      Sounds a lot like the way reference managers work. In many cases, people keep the invalid or badly-formed results.

  10. Jul 2015
    1. Mr. Obama has already tapped executives in Silicon Valley companies to help with technology problems in his administration.

      Private sector technologists, while important to work with, would not be good choices IMO, especially considering the need to cut down copyright law and especially considering that libraries often work with the poor and disadvantaged. Considering Silicon Valley's egregious income disparity, I don't think there are many in Silicon Valley who would be appropriate for this position.

      Why is it always that the most notable position in a largely FEMALE profession, has been held exclusively by white men?

    2. If the president accepted that recommendation, his choices might include Anthony W. Marx, president of the New York Public Library; David S. Ferriero, the archivist of the United States; or Sarah Thomas, the librarian at Harvard.

      I like how most of the choices listed in this article are white men. How about someone who actually represents librarianship? Like a woman? Maybe even from a public university, why from Harvard?