436 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. Cringing at your own memories does no one any good. On the other hand, systematically reviewing your older work to find the patterns in where you got it wrong (and right!) is hugely beneficial — it’s a useful process of introspection that makes it easier to spot and avoid your own pitfalls.

      This idea is far from new and is roughly what Georg Christoph Lichtenberg was doing with the science portions of his Waste Books in the late 1700's where he was running experiments, noting wins, losses, and making progress using the scientific method.

    2. The genius of the blog was not in the note-taking, it was in the publishing. The act of making your log-file public requires a rigor that keeping personal notes does not. Writing for a notional audience — particularly an audience of strangers — demands a comprehensive account that I rarely muster when I’m taking notes for myself. I am much better at kidding myself my ability to interpret my notes at a later date than I am at convincing myself that anyone else will be able to make heads or tails of them.Writing for an audience keeps me honest.

      I've seen this sentiment before as well.This is also well attested in writing code too.

      Writing for the public keeps you honest and makes one put more work into the product than they otherwise might.

    3. The very act of recording your actions and impressions is itself powerfully mnemonic, fixing the moment more durably in your memory so that it’s easier to recall in future, even if you never consult your notes.

      Many people report this phenomenon, though I've never particularly experienced it.

    1. “Sibi scribere: The reasonable author writes for no other posterity than his own, for his own old age, in order to take pleasure in himself even then,” Blumenberg quotes Nietzsche (here, 83).
    2. Ideas have a history, but so do the tools that lend disembodied ideas their material shape −− most commonly, text on a page. The text is produced with the help of writing tools such as pencil, typewriter, or computer keyboard, and of note-taking tools such as ledger, notebook, or mobile phone app. These tools themselves embody the merging of often very different histories. Lichtenberg’s notebooks are a good example, drawing as they do on mercantile bookkeeping, the humanist tradition of the commonplace book, and Pietist autobiographical writing (see Petra McGillen’s detailed analysis).

      I like the thought of not only the history of thoughts and ideas, but also the history of the tools that may have helped to make them.

      I'm curious to delve into Pietist autobiographical writing as a concept.

    3. As Friedrich Nietzsche famously conceded to his friend Heinrich Köselitz a century later, “You are right — our writing tools take part in the forming of our thoughts.”

      This is a fascinating quote and something I've thought about before. Ties to McLuhan's "the medium is the message" as well.

  2. May 2021
  3. Apr 2021
    1. As I was gearing up to start my PhD last fall, I received a piece of advice that made a lot of sense at the time, and continues to do so. My colleague, Inba told me to 'write while I read', meaning that I should take notes and summarize research while I read it, and not just read and underline article after article. That way, not only do I not lose my thoughts while I'm reading an article, but I am actively thinking through the arguments in the paper while I am reading it and my writing is thoroughly grounded in the literature.

      This is generally fantastic advice! It's also the general underpinning behind the idea of Luhmann's zettelkasten method.

      I'll also mention that it's not too dissimilar to Benjamin Franklin's writing advice about taking what others have written and working with that yourself, though there he doesn't take it as far as others have since.

    1. Nevertheless, Milton does not force the issue concerningbelief in God's mere existence, for that is something he simply assumes; forhim God's existence is a premise much more than a conclusion (see YP 6:130-2). In spite of the radical polarities of belief about God in ParadiseLost, its humans and devils and angels are united in this: they all believethat he is

      I'm glad this is brought up. I think its really interesting that Milton, a devout Christian, was able to write something that retold a story from the bible- the characters being Christian icons- without needing to convince the readers that God is real/Christianity is the path to salvation. His intention was not to convert readers, but to write! By carefully crafting PL's character relationships, the importance of faith is naturally conveyed through the dialogue between all characters.

    1. We Instead of You. Use the first-person plural when possible. Statements of we and our are more powerful than you and your, especially when talking about negative behaviors or tendencies. The first person comes off as far less accusatory. Think of it this way: we’re writing peer-to-peer—we are not gods.

      This makes so much sense - colleagues and fellow sojourners instead of a lecture.

    1. Building a wonky factory is way more fun than it has any right to be - and being rewarded for leaving last turn's pieces where they are (or punished for moving them) means that you're always working on top of the mess you made last turn, though you're never completely stuck.
    1. The best procedure is the one you don’t need. If the UI is crystal clear and leads the customer through a task, a procedure isn’t necessary. Start there.
    1. <small><cite class='h-cite via'> <span class='p-author h-card'> James Somers</span> in You’re probably using the wrong dictionary (<time class='dt-published'>04/03/2021 15:21:10</time>)</cite></small>

    1. A book where you can enter “sport” and end up with “a diversion of the field” — this is in fact the opposite of what I’d known a dictionary to be. This is a book that transmutes plain words into language that’s finer and more vivid and sometimes more rare. No wonder McPhee wrote with it by his side. No wonder he looked up words he knew, versus words he didn’t, in a ratio of “at least ninety-nine to one.”

      The real reason for using a dictionary.

    2. le mot juste.

      "the right word" in French. Coined by 19th-century novelist Gustave Flaubert, who often spent weeks looking for the right word to use.

      Flaubert spent his life agonizing over "le mot juste." Now Madame Bovary is available in 20 different crappy english translations, so now it doesn't really make a damn bit of difference. by namealreadyusedbysomeoneelse July 21, 2009 at https://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=le%20mot%20juste

    3. John McPhee — one the great American writers of nonfiction, almost peerless as a prose stylist — once wrote an essay for the New Yorker about his process called “Draft #4.” He explains that for him, draft #4 is the draft after the painstaking labor of creation is done, when all that’s left is to punch up the language, to replace shopworn words and phrases with stuff that sings.

      I quite like the idea of this Draft #4 concept.

  4. Mar 2021
    1. A nice list of replacement words to make one's writing seem warmer and more human.

      It would be cool if tools like Grammar.ly or Hemmingway.app had pieces like this built in.

    1. He wrote for the same editor, Michael Korda at Simon & Schuster, for more than three decades before moving to Liveright, an imprint of W.W. Norton, in 2014.

      Too few editors are spoken of...

    2. In the late 1960s and early ’70s, he liked to tweak his critics by wearing a T-shirt that read “Minor Regional Novelist.”

      I want a shirt like this!

    1. Since “Sexy Times With Wangxian” became a whole Thing, it has spawned memes, spinoff fics, and a frankly fabulous fic prompt generator that scans all of the STWW tags and chooses some at random for you to write fics around. Just now I got the tags, “Foursome – M/M/M/M,” “I’m Bad At Summaries,” “Cryptography,” “Body Dysphoria,” and “Organs.” Outstanding.

      This could be an interesting feature for a personal website/blog. A generator that takes pre-existing taxonomies from one's website and suggests combinations of them as potential writing prompts when one has writer's block.

    1. we (the researchers) shared our own career dream boards with the girls

      I love that Jennifer and Autumn also created their own boards and shared them with Tamika and Malia. The questions that followed are a lovely example of the power of doing this.

      Writing alongside each other, and sharing our writing, is a powerful way to support literacy learning and dialogue and a core writing project practice. It is powerful to see this practice within the research here.

    2. shared our own career dream boards with the girls

      I love that Jennifer and Autumn also created their own boards and shared them with Tamika and Malia. The questions that followed are a lovely example of the power of doing this.

      Writing alongside each other, and sharing our writing, is a powerful way to support literacy learning and dialogue and a core writing project practice. It is powerful to see this practice within the research here.

  5. Feb 2021
    1. One study suggests that academics who write daily and set goals with someone weekly write nearly ten times as many pages as those without regular writing habits.

      See Silvia, P. J. (2018). How to Write a Lot: A Practical Guide to Productive Academic Writing (Second Edition). APA LifeTools.

    1. This left branching sentence forces the brain to ‘hold’ a lot of information about what the academic managers are doing before applying it to the action. It’s the kind of sentence that forces the reader to go back to the start after they have finished in order to really understand what is going on.

      See Pinker, S. (2015). The Sense of Style: The Thinking Person’s Guide to Writing in the 21st Century (Reprint Edition). Penguin Books for a more detailed discussion of these points.

    1. Does that make it so? Not for me. Were it simply a matter of words, I wouldn't write another word on the matter. But there are two distinct concepts behind these terms, concepts engendered separately and best understood separately.
    1. An academic blogger may feel constrained to topics only related to his or her academic research, whereas a blogger who is also an academic is free to explore wider fields of discussion.

      This idea of "identity" is important. Many academics don't even think of themselves as authors let alone bloggers.

    1. Fewer screenshots means less maintenance work. If the product changes, the screenshots must change too, to remain helpful and prevent confusion. Lots of screenshots plus frequent product changes can cost a lot of time: keeping the docs in sync with the product can become unmanageable. A middle-ground approach is using text descriptions of UI elements, like “Click the START button”, as it’s easier to keep text descriptions matching the UI. And well-designed user interfaces and UI microcopy often mean that users don’t need screenshots to find their way through the product.
  6. Jan 2021
    1. Are the books that much better than the disses? Mostly, no, I'd say. So what's the deal? I think it's that we just like books. And by "we" I mean the whole industry of academe.

      Often when I see this pattern happening, the dissertation is the new and original research and the subsequent book is a rewriting of that research into a form meant to help popularize and distribute it into a broader public.

      This is similar, in a way to journal articles being written about by science journalists which then usually massively broadens the audience of the work. Usually this version helps the work to reach more eyeballs than the dissertation to book route does.

      Another version of this might be the translation of a screenplay and a move into a novelization for popular movies. Some of the goal here however is just to make more money.

      It's worth looking at who is (privileged to be) doing the writing in each of these cases.

    1. clear goals

      I find this to be particularly important, in part because if you have clear goals then you're usually less susceptible to distractions.

    1. One of the things that Platformer members support is my ability to use part of each week to mentor junior writers. Today I want to tell you about my first mentee: Benjamin Strak, author of Design Lobster. As its name suggests, it’s a newsletter about how objects look and work, with an eye toward connecting modern designs with historical antecedents.

      Example of a writer with a platform helping out new talent.

    1. formulating written policy governing operations and defining programs securing funding necessary to carry out the museum's programs preparing or approving an annual budget and monitoring it to ensure public accountability ensuring that the purposes for which the museum exists are being fulfilled

      Program development, grant writing accountability and documentation.

    1. Verb plus noun is the winning combination. Describe what the link does and what it gets you: <a download href="downloads/fonts.zip"> Download Fonts </a> By itself, the verb Download would only signal what behavior will be triggered when the link is activated. Including the noun Fonts is great for removing ambiguity about what you’ll be getting.
    2. The debate about whether a button or link should be used to download a file is a bit silly, as the whole purpose of a link has always been to download content. HTML is a file, and like all other files, it needs to be retrieved from a server and downloaded before it can be presented to a user. The difference between a Photoshop file, HTML, and other understood media files, is that a browser automatically displays the latter two. If one were to link to a Photoshop .psd file, the browser would initiate a document change to render the file, likely be all like, “lol wut?” and then just initiate the OS download prompt. The confusion seems to come from developers getting super literal with the “links go places, buttons perform actions.” Yes, that is true, but links don’t actually go anywhere. They retrieve information and download it. Buttons perform actions, but they don’t inherently “get” documents. While they can be used to get data, it’s often to change state of a current document, not to retrieve and render a new one. They can get data, in regards to the functionality of forms, but it continues to be within the context of updating a web document, not downloading an individual file. Long story short, the download attribute is unique to anchor links for a reason. download augments the inherent functionality of the link retrieving data. It side steps the attempt to render the file in the browser and instead says, “You know what? I’m just going to save this for later…”
    1. Ideas cause ideas and help evolve new ideas. They interact with each other and with other mental forces in the same brain, in neighboring brains, and thanks to global communication, in far distant, foreign brains.

      Steven Pinker said that writing is a way for one mind to cause ideas to happen in other minds.

    1. The hacks unanimously shared Dr Johnson’s view that “No man but a blockhead ever wrote except for money”, while my academic colleagues thought it peculiar to waste one’s energy writing anything that would not figure in scholarly citation indices. The idea that one might maintain a blog simply because one enjoyed doing it never crossed their minds.
  7. Dec 2020
    1. Include articles, such as the. Articles help readers and translation software identify the nouns and modifiers in a sentence. Examples Empty the container. The empty container
    1. Making UIs with Svelte is a pleasure. Svelte’s aesthetics feel like a warm cozy blanket on the stormy web. This impacts everything — features, documentation, syntax, semantics, performance, framework internals, npm install size, the welcoming and helpful community attitude, and its collegial open development and RFCs — it all oozes good taste. Its API is tight, powerful, and good looking — I’d point to actions and stores to support this praise, but really, the whole is what feels so good. The aesthetics of underlying technologies have a way of leaking into the end user experience.
    1. Put yourself in the reader’s position and see if you can get a grip on how they might respond to your writing.

      It seems like good advice but it's actually quite hard to divorce yourself from what you know. See the curse of knowledge.

      This is why I think that having this list of questions is a good idea; you don't have to rely solely on putting yourself in the reader's shoes.

    1. Lanier is sometimes credited as the father of virtual reality; he is also sometimes credited as the owner of the world's largest flute

      Nice juxtaposition.

  8. Nov 2020
    1. More importantly, both systems assume that writers have full access to the full conversation that prompts them into writing. On Substack, there are too many walls dividing up the garden.
    2. I invite you to read some of these investigations (start with “The World Twitter Made.” Also relevant: “Requiem For the Strategy Sphere," "Public Intellectuals Have Short Shelf Lives,” “Life in the Shadow of the Boomers,” “Book Notes: Strategy, a History,” and “On Adding Phrases to the Language.”) A running theme in all of these essays is the importance of seeing individual authors not as individual authors, but as voices in a chorus. No writer is an island. If a "public voice" is inspired to spend hours massaging paragraphs and digging up references, it is because she has something to prove, and more important still, someone to prove it to. She writes in response to ideas she has heard or read. She feels compelled to add her voice to a larger conversation. The best thinkers speak to more than their immediate contemporaries, but without that contemporary argument in the background few would bother speaking at all.
    1. Keep sentences small. They’re easier to work with that way.If something doesn’t feel right, there’s a problem with one or more of your sentences. Listen to that feeling. Try to pinpoint exactly which word or phrase is triggering it. Naming exactly what’s wrong, in grammatical terminology or otherwise, will come later.Understanding a word’s etymology will teach you how to use it. Words contain imprints of their histories.The subject of a sentence should appear as close to the beginning of a sentence as possible.You don’t have to “grab” anyone with the first line of your story. Just write a simple sentence that says what you want it to say. It’s harder than it sounds! And also very effective, if done well.“A writer’s real work is the endless winnowing of sentences, the relentless exploration of possibilities, the effort, over and over again, to see in what you started out to say the possibility of saying something you didn’t know you could.”Noun phrases (“the realization that…”) almost always sound clunky and dead. Try rewriting them as verb phrases (“realizing that…”).Prepositions are difficult to get right, even for native English speakers.A reader’s experience has nothing to do with a writer’s. A sentence that reads “naturally” or “conversationally” to a reader may have been painstakingly assembled by a stressed-out writer who wishes they could sound more natural or conversational.

      How to write more effectively:

      • Keep sentences small. They’re easier to work with that way.

      • If something doesn’t feel right, there’s a problem with one or more of your sentences. Listen to that feeling. Try to pinpoint exactly which word or phrase is triggering it. Naming exactly what’s wrong, in grammatical terminology or otherwise, will come later.

      • Understanding a word’s etymology will teach you how to use it. Words contain imprints of their histories.

      • The subject of a sentence should appear as close to the beginning of a sentence as possible.

      • You don’t have to “grab” anyone with the first line of your story. Just write a simple sentence that says what you want it to say. It’s harder than it sounds! And also very effective, if done well.

      • “A writer’s real work is the endless winnowing of sentences, the relentless exploration of possibilities, the effort, over and over again, to see in what you started out to say the possibility of saying something you didn’t know you could.”

      • Noun phrases (“the realization that…”) almost always sound clunky and dead. Try rewriting them as verb phrases (“realizing that…”).

      • Prepositions are difficult to get right, even for native English speakers.

      • A reader’s experience has nothing to do with a writer’s. A sentence that reads “naturally” or “conversationally” to a reader may have been painstakingly assembled by a stressed-out writer who wishes they could sound more natural or conversational.

    1. One pane: With one pane outliners, the content is displayed immediately below the category. A printed legal document is an example of a one-pane document. A web site with a table-of-contents "frame" on the left hand side is similar to a two-pane outline. A Usene t news group is similar to a three pane outline. When writing documents, or organizing ideas for a project (such as a speech, or for software design) I much prefer one pane outlines. I find they are more conducive to collapsing ideas, because you can mix text with categories, rather than radically split ting the organizational technique from the content (as the two and three pane outlines do).

      In one pane outliners the text is displayed under its parent.

      This can be more conducive to writing because you're not splitting work on the organization from work on the content. In writing this separation is fuzzy anyway.

    1. It also means that my annotations are in the paths of others and I need to consider that, forcing me to add context and consideration to my own notes.

      Epiphany! Social annotating while reading brings to READING a stance I try to have when WRITING: considering an audience. Do I read differently when my annotations mean my reading has an audience?

  9. Oct 2020
    1. Look at their Readme:

      Well we have had a great time adding field validations, but there are validations that are tied up to the whole record we are editing than to a given field, for instance let's face this scenario:
      
      - You are not allowed to transfer more than 1000 € to Switzerland using this form (for instance: you have to go through another form where some additional documentation is required).
      
      - The best place to fire this validation is at record level.
      
      - Record validation functions accept as input parameter that whole form record info, and return the result of the validation (it accepts both flavours sync and promise based), let's check the code for this validator:
      
      ...
      
    1. As objective you may try to be, interpreting a text doesn’t happen in a vacuum. The hermeneutic circle captures the complex interaction between an interpreter and a text.

      This is the only useful idea in the text. Whatever we read has the context in which it was written and the context in whcih it is being read. Is this a hermeneutic circle as described earlier? Don't think so.

    1. Consider that no single step in the process of turning raw ideas into finished pieces of writing is particularly difficult. It isn’t very hard to write down notes in the first place. Nor is turning a group of notes into an outline very demanding. It also isn’t much of a challenge to turn a working outline full of relevant arguments into a rough draft. And polishing a well-conceived rough draft into a final draft is trivial. So if each individual step is so easy, why do we find the overall experience of writing so grueling? Because we try to do all the steps at once. Each of the activities that make up “writing” – reading, reflecting, having ideas, making connections, distinguishing terms, finding the right words, structuring, organizing, editing, correcting, and rewriting – require a very different kind of attention.
    2. Writing then is best seen not only as a tool for thinking but as a tool for personal growth.
    3. This principle requires us to expand our definition of “publication” beyond the usual narrow sense. Few people will ever publish their work in an academic journal or even on a blog. But everything that we write down and share with someone else counts: notes we share with a friend, homework we submit to a professor, emails we write to our colleagues, and presentations we deliver to clients all count as knowledge made public.

      This idea underlies the reason why one might want to have a public online commonplace book or digital garden.

    1. Could I also use Indie Web tools for a persona, or is that not in keeping with the community?

      The community is all about websites and identity, so having a website for a pen name is exactly the sort of thing you should definitely do! I'm sure there are a few who have done it, but I'm unaware of any documenting it yet. Starting a stub page on the wiki for pen name could be a good start if you do.

    1. Perhaps we want to write but we feel comfortable with our phones and so we want to write on our phones. It’s like the best camera being the one you have on you. The best writing implement is the one you have on you. These days, it might be your phone.

      I often find the quickest and easiest writing implement I've got is the Hypothes.is browser extension.

      Click a button and start writing. In the background, I've got a tool that's pulling all the content I've written and posting it quickly to my own website as a micropub post.

    1. About this time I met with an odd volume of the Spectator.[18] It was the third. I had never before seen any of them. I bought it, read it over and over, and was much delighted with it. I thought the writing excellent, and wished, if possible, to imitate it. With this view I took some of the papers, and, making short hints of the sentiment in each sentence, laid them by a few days, and then, without looking at the book, try'd to compleat the papers again, by expressing each hinted sentiment at length, and as fully as it had been expressed before, in any suitable words that should come to hand. Then I compared my Spectator with the original, discovered some of my faults, and corrected them. But I found I wanted a stock of words, or a readiness in recollecting and using them, which I thought I should have acquired before that time if I had gone on making verses; since the continual occasion for words of the same import, but of different length, to suit the measure, or of different sound for the rhyme, would have laid me under a constant necessity of searching for variety, and also have tended to fix that variety in my mind, and make me master of it. Therefore I took some of the tales and turned them into verse; and, after a time, when I had pretty well forgotten the prose, turned them back again. I also sometimes jumbled my collections of hints into confusion, and after some weeks endeavored to reduce them into the best order, before I began to form the full sentences and compleat the paper. This was to teach me method in the arrangement of thoughts. By comparing my work afterwards with the original, I discovered many faults and amended them; but I sometimes had the pleasure of fancying that, in certain particulars of small import, I had been lucky enough to improve the method of the language, and this encouraged me to think I might possibly in time come to be a tolerable English writer, of which I was extremely ambitious. My time for these exercises and for reading was at night, after work or before it began in the morning, or on Sundays, when I contrived to be in the printing-house alone, evading as much as I could the common attendance on public worship which my father used to exact of me when I was under his care, and which indeed I still thought a duty, thought I could not, as it seemed to me, afford time to practise it.

      Even the greats copied or loosely plagiarized the "masters" to learn how to write.The key is to continually work at it until you get to the point where it's yours and it is no longer plagiarism.

      This was also the general premise behind the plotline of the movie Finding Forrester.

  10. Sep 2020
    1. Writing in the margins has always been an essential activity for students.

      I never really got into the habit of writing in the margins of books, it was something that never really occurred to me. While I am still hesitant to write in the margins of physical books, doing so digitally does appeal. Something I am starting to get more into, now that I'm on the journey to getting my Arts and Humanities degree.

    1. His frequent and asynchronous essays, letters, and replies meant there was always something to look forward to, without immediate pressure to respond.

      This is a really interesting way to think about class communication. I'm particularly intrigued by this idea of there not being immediate pressure to respond - that's not my normal interpretation of class emails and I don't think it's most faculty members'.

    1. repetition of yes all leads up to the final yes to marriage. the lack of punctuation also makes the whole thing read as if it's being said very quickly, as if a lot of thoughts are happening all at once.

    1. master

      the duality of master and disaster

    2. losing

      the repetition of the many forms of the verb "to lose" highlights the theme of loss throughout the poem without the poet having to explicitly tell the reader what it is about

    1. We 

      The repetition of the word "we" (as well as the placement in the poem) create a rhythm that stands out. Especially since the lines are very short, the words that are repeated stands out even more.

    1. Most writers don’t write to express what they think. They write to figure out what they think. Writing is a process of discovery.

      This is good point about blogging, however it's also a different way of thinking about writing than using e.g. Zettelkasten, where the thinking process is within the boundary of slip-box, but the outcome is composed from the notes you have.

    1. Independent Variable Manipulation

      Independent variable manipulation is the hallmark of experimental design.

    2. empirical and qualitative evidence suggests that students prefer to have writing feedback delivered electronically.

      This information about student and instructor preferences for submitting coursework online or in person provides the starting point in the argument for providing feedback to students electronically, rather than coming to class with a paper copy and receive handwritten notes on the paper copy.

    3. Writing proficiency is an essential learning outcome for undergraduate education as a whole and, specifically, in postsecondary psychology education. The American Psychological Association (APA, 2013) explicitly names effective writing as a goal in its guidelines for psychology majors,

      Effective writing is a core principle in education, emphasized by the most noted national psychological associations (APA; American Psychological Association). The following sections outline efforts to streamline the methods used instructor to student feedback for essays in a psychology class.

    1. We use the em dash to create a strong break in the structure of a sentence. We can use these dashes in pairs, as we would use parentheses—that is, to enclose a word, or a phrase, or a clause (as we’ve done here)—or they can be used alone to detach one end of a sentence from its main body.
    2. on Hyphen, em dashes and en dashes.

    1. hyphen, em dash, en dash

      Hyphen

      1. combine words making compounds.

      e.g., well-being advanced-level school-aged 16-year-old

      Em Dash

      Em is a typographical unit of measure.

      1. Use the em dash to create a strong break in the meaning and structure of a sentence. They can be used in pairs like parentheses, or alone as a way to detach the end or beginning of a sentence from the main body.

      En Dash means as "through", often used to describe a range of numbers 2–27, 30–35 years old.

      In the associated press style there is advice to use a space in between the dashes.

      When to use em dashes versus comma vs. em dashes.

      Parentheses, can sometimes be interpreted to downplay importance of information.

      Commas, okay to use unless you have more commas in the sentence, and doesn't draw particular attention to info — doesn't emphasize it enough.

      Em Dashes, indicate that information is important or are useful when commas don't work.

    1. Defining the Issues — If you’ve asked a clear question to which there are multiple answers then an issue has been defined. Opposing answers, now translated into your terms, must be ordered in relation to one another. Understanding multiple perspectives within an issue helps you form an intelligent opinion.

      [[Writing Tips for Software Engineers]] - helping them identify these issues, which ones are in scope or not. how to track the decision making process around this