45 Matching Annotations
  1. Dec 2018
    1. I think that’s the biggest success of this project: Using the power of technology, turning this abstract concept of Palestine that we’ve been told about as children — this is your homeland and this is the place where you belong — turning that into something that’s really tangible.
  2. Nov 2018
    1. And earlier this year, CMS announced that by this time next year hospitalists would be assigned their own specialty designation code. SHM’s Public Policy Committee lobbied for the move for more than two years.
    2. By 2007, SHM had launched Project BOOST (Better Outcomes by Optimizing Safe Transitions), an award-winning mentored-implementation program to reduce LOS, adverse events, and unnecessary 30-day readmissions. Other mentored-implementation programs followed. The Glycemic Control Mentored Implementation (GCMI) program focuses on preventing hypoglycemia, while the Venous Thromboembolism Prevention Collaborative (VTE PC) seeks to give practical assistance on how to reduce blood clots via a VTE prevention program

      Other SHM Mentored Implementation programs -

      • Atul Gawande
      • I-PASS
      • PFC I-PASS Link this to
      • Dissemination and implementation of research findings
      • Twenty years since to err is human
    3. In 2012, SHM earned the 2011 John M. Eisenberg Patient Safety and Quality Award for Innovation in Patient Safety and Quality at the National Level, thanks to its mentored-implementation programs. SHM was the first professional society to earn the award, bestowed by the National Quality Forum (NQF) and The Joint Commission.
    4. By 2003, the term “hospitalist” had become ubiquitous enough that NAIP was renamed the Society of Hospital Medicine
    5. John Nelson, MD, MHM, and Winthrop Whitcomb, MD, MHM, founded the National Association of Inpatient Physicians (NAIP) a year after the NEJM paper, they promoted and held a special session at UCSF’s first “Management of the Hospitalized Patient” conference in April 1997
    1. This article stuck me immediately as a former K-12 teacher who now works in higher education. Andragogy and Pedagogy are both extremely similar and unalike in many ways. It is important to understand technological styles in pedagogy, as this article demonstrates, in order to effectively apply similar principles in the higher education setting.

      Rating: 8/10

    1. This article brings up the important issue of accessibility as a barrier to technology integration. It is suggested that accessibility should be a much more pressing concern than technological relevance to a lesson plan. First it is important to know whether or not all students will still have equal access and ability to reach mastery with the deliver method provided.

      Rating: 7/10

    1. This article focuses on the importance of using technological integration in the classroom correctly and effectively. Barriers to effectiveness, as the article states, are often linked to lack of rational, vision, or necessity for including technology in instruction.

      Rating: 8/10

    1. This article gives a few quick insights into how technology is useful in academic advising. This article makes the distinction between technology "complementing" advising and actually impacting student success. In other words, technology should never be a sole substitute for success. I would like to see more numerical-based data supporting the claims listed, but there are some great resources cited.

      Rating: 7/10

    1. Online Options Give Adults Access, but Outcomes Lag

      In this article, drivers that increase and improve online learning success in adults are explored. State by state data along with federal stats contribute to the conclusions presented.

      Roughly 13% of all undergraduates are full-time online students and between 2012 and 2017 online students grew y 11 percent, about 2.25 million. The article presents a map showing state by state stats and the information provided can assist in growing individual school needs.

      RATING: 4/5 (rating based upon a score system 1 to 5, 1= lowest 5=highest in terms of content, veracity, easiness of use etc.)

    1. Humans participate in social learning for a variety of adaptive reasons, such as reducing uncertainty (Kameda and Nakanishi, 2002), learning complex skills and knowledge that could not have been invented by a single individual alone (Richerson and Boyd, 2000; Tomasello, Kruger, and Ratner, 1993), and passing on beneficial cultural traits to offspring (Palmer, 2010). One proposed social-learning mechanism is prestige bias (Henrich and Gil-White, 2001), defined as the selective copying of certain “prestigious” individuals to whom others freely show deference or respect in orderto increase the amount and accuracy of information available to the learner.Prestige bias allows a learner in a novel environment to quickly and inexpensively choose from whom to learn, thus maximizing his or her chances of acquiring adaptive behavioral so lutions toa specific task or enterprisewit hout having to assess directly the adaptiveness of every potential model’s behavior.Learners provide deference to teachers in order to ingratiate themselves with a chosen model, thus gaining extended exposure to that model(Henrich and Gil-White, 2001).New learners can then use that information—who is paying attention to whom—to increase their likelihood of choosing a good teacher.

      Throughout this article are several highlighted passages that combine to form this annotation.

      This research study presents the idea that the social environment is a self-selected learning environment for adults. The idea of social prestige-bias learning is intriguing because it is derived from the student, not an institution nor instructor. The further idea of selecting whom to learn from based on prestige-bias also creates further questions that warrant a deeper understanding of the learner and the environment which s/he creates to gain knowledge.

      Using a previously conducted experiment on success-based learning and learning due to environmental change, this research further included the ideal of social prestige-biased learning.self-selected by the learner.

      In a study of 167 participants, three hypotheses were tested to see if learners would select individual learning, social learning, prestige-biased learning (also a social setting), or success-based learning. The experiment tested both an initial learning environment and a learning environment which experienced a change in the environment.

      Surprisingly, some participants selected social prestige-biased learning and some success learning and the percentages in each category did not change after the environmental change occurred.

      Questions that arise from the study:

      • Does social prestige, or someone who is deemed prestigious, equate to a knowledgeable teacher?
      • Does the social prestige-biased environment reflect wise choices?
      • If the student does not know what s/he does not know, will the social prestige-bias result in selecting the better teacher, or just in selecting a more highly recognized teacher?
      • Why did the environmental change have little impact on the selected learning environment?

      REFERENCE: Atkinson, C., O’Brien, M.J., & Mesoudi, A. (2012). Adult learners in a novel environment use prestige-biased social learning. Evolutionary Psychology, 10(3), 519-537. Retrieved from (Prestige-biased Learning )

      RATINGS content, 9/10 veracity, 8/10 easiness of use, 9/10 Overall Rating, 8.67/10

  3. Mar 2018
    1. they performed slightly better in their identical and blind-marked final assessments -- a finding the study hailed as “the first rigorous evidence that we know of showing that an online degree program can increase educational attainment.”
  4. Oct 2017
    1. I had the privilege of having breakfast with that student panel, and they were even more lovely before they got up on stage.

      Absolutely one of the highlights of #opened17!

  5. Jul 2017
  6. Mar 2017
    1. 텐센트를 모바일 왕좌에 앉힌 주역 '쟝샤오룽' : 텐센트에서 위챗을 만든 쟝샤오룽에 대한 글이다. 이전에 폭스메일을 만들어서 매각하고 텐센트에서 QQ 메일을 만들면서 위챗을 만들어서 성공하기까지의 과정이 나와 있다. 중국 서비스의 흐름은 잘 모르는 터라 재미있게 읽었다.(한국어)
  7. Jan 2017
    1. Richardson, Lawver, Ross, and Meeter are the future politicians, activists, educators, writers,entrepreneurs, and media makers.

      It is insane to see such success out of young kids with the use of technology

  8. Oct 2016
    1. Devices connected to the cloud allow professors to gather data on their students and then determine which ones need the most individual attention and care.
    1. They focused on two kinds of students. The “thrivers” were those who did much better in college than their high school grades would have predicted. The “divers” were those who did much worse. Mostly, these students were neither superstars in high school nor delinquents — they all got fairly good, respectable grades. But upon arriving at college, the thrivers averaged A's, while the divers averaged F's.

      One explanation for this could be that the “thrivers” did better because they had to step their game up because of the difficulty of the classes while the “divers” stuck with the same habits they had in high school. The thrivers wanted to become better students than they were in the previous years. The divers thought that their academic abilities needed no change. The thrivers were the students that tried their best to succeed and push themselves forward no matter any obstacle. They are also resilient and try their best to learn from their mistakes in order to succeed. Thrivers have a growth mindset where they strive for success and do not let every little bump in the road alter their paths. Divers, on the other hand were the students that would give up easily when things get difficult, they are the students that would find the easy way out of hard situations instead of challenging themselves. Divers do not necessarily fail because they “lack the skills” but because they have developed a fixed mindset. Divers can still be able to learn how to become thrivers. They just need a little more guidance and assistance in order to get to that level. Thrivers have a different mindset apart from divers. Thrivers want to succeed, to move forward in their educational journey. But a student can become either personality very quickly. A thriver can thrive for a while, and then plummet just as hard as a diver. College is about preparing yourself and trying new things in order to find out what works best for you. Divers are not a lost cause, they might need some extra help, but we should not ignore them because they are failing in their classes, we do not know what is going through their head. Media has made college out to be an option to what happens next after high school. There are more movies portraying a college lifestyle of partying, rather than of success. The movie The Social Network is an example of someone who was a thriver then a diver then rose back to a thriver. Instead of making college seem as glamorous as a party, students need to understand the difficulty of college and the journey they are starting. Here is a link to the Mark Zuckerberg story and his success as both a thriver and diver. https://astrumpeople.com/mark-zuckerberg-biography-success-story-of-facebook-founder-and-ceo/

    1. Either way, student motivation and engagement are closely related elements of student learning that can have an impact on learning outcomes. Beer etal. (2010)state that in spite of the fact that there is no universally accept-ed definition of what comprises engagement, student and college success, student retention and student motivation are always linked to engagement.
  9. Sep 2016
    1. mis-read or failed to read the labor market for different degree types.

      Sounds fairly damning for a business based on helping diverse students with the labour market…

    2. The aggressive recruiting did not extend to aggressive retainment and debt management.
    3. under-motivated or differently motivated students

      Intriguing categories. Would be interested in how these came up through interviews.

    1. "In a personalized learning environment, a student’s success is defined by knowledge, skills, habits and mindsets," she wrote. "Though we have a lot more work to do, we’re encouraged by student growth and survey results."
  10. Aug 2016
    1. play to their strengths while mitigating their weaknesses

      It might be a difficult balancing act and it sounds a bit like the recipe for optimal experience, but it can help situate education models in a more appropriate way.

    2. this model of “personalization” is still building off of a deficit model in which students are steered away from doing the things they are good at so they can focus on the things they are bad at

      Important reminder, cogently stated.

  11. Jul 2016
    1. which applicants are most likely to matriculate
    2. Colleges using data analytics have to make sure their students have “open futures” — that their programs create educational opportunities, not the other way around.

      Another side to Open Education: open opportunities. While they still mean “opportunities for success in the current system”, it’s compatible with a view of student success which goes beyond the current system.

    3. "We know the day before the course starts which students are highly unlikely to succeed,"

      Easier to do with a strict model for success.

  12. Apr 2016
    1. The differences in their outcomes, though, is astounding.

      The one thing I'd note is the personality confound -- the people who get inspired by profs, seek out extra work, involve in extra-curriculars, etc. may just be people who approach life with a better attitude period, or may be from a social class that allowed them to do these things.

    2. a professor who made them excited about learning professors who cared about them as a person a mentor who encouraged them to pursue their goals and dreams worked on a long-term project had a job or internship where they applied what they were learning were extremely involved in extra-curricular activities

      The BIG SIX.

      (bug/feature note -- does not carry over basic formatting)

    3. See how “Big Six” experiences are linked to key college, work and life outcomes

      Wow. Dose response relationship of sorts.

  13. Feb 2016
    1. narratives of emotional and social journeys from being at academic risk in high schools to being academically successful in universities academic experiences.

      These are indeed the stories we need to hear, and the data that needs to be collected -- how ever she drew data from narratives.

  14. Jan 2016
    1. “If you set your goals ridiculously high and it’s a failure, you will fail above everyone else’s success.”

      Quote from James Cameron

  15. Oct 2015
    1. Local white children had a school bus. Clyde Ross did not, and thus lost the chance to better his education

      Opportunity often influences the paths we are able to follow. The novel, Outliers, by Malcom Gladwell is a study of cultural anthropology that goes into depth regarding how opportunity impacts success.

      http://www.amazon.com/Outliers-Story-Success-Malcolm-Gladwell/dp/0316017930

  16. Sep 2015
    1. We found that measures of family socioeconomic status had no significant correlation at all with later success in any of these areas. Alcoholism and depression in family histories proved irrelevant to flourishing at 80, as did longevity. The sociability and extraversion that were so highly valued in the initial process of selecting the men did not correlate with later flourishing either. In contrast with the weak and scattershot correlations among the biological and socioeconomic variables, a loving childhood—and other factors like empathic capacity and warm relationships as a young adult—predicted later success in all ten categories of the Decathlon. What’s more, success in relationships was very highly correlated with both economic success and strong mental and physical health, the other two broad areas of the Decathlon.

      From the Grant Study.

    1. The era of Reconstruction that followed the Civil War was a time ofintense political and social conflict, in which the definition of freedomand the question of who was entitled to enjoy it played a central role.
  17. Apr 2015
    1. If you want to help low-income students succeed, it’s not enough to deal with their academic and financial obstacles. You also need to address their doubts and misconceptions and fears. To solve the problem of college completion, you first need to get inside the mind of a college student.

      How do you get inside the mind of a college student?

  18. Jan 2014
    1. This suggests that peer production will thrive where projects have three characteristi cs

      If thriving is a metric (is it measurable? too subjective?) of success then the 3 characteristics it must have are:

      • modularity: divisible into components
      • granularity: fine-grained modularity
      • integrability: low-cost integration of contributions

      I don't dispute that these characteristics are needed, but they are too general to be helpful, so I propose that we look at these three characteristics through the lens of the type of contributor we are seeking to motivate.

      How do these characteristics inform what we should focus on to remove barriers to collaboration for each of these contributor-types?

      Below I've made up a rough list of lenses. Maybe you have links or references that have already made these classifications better than I have... if so, share them!

      Roughly here are the classifications of the types of relationships to open source projects that I commonly see:

      • core developers: either hired by a company, foundation, or some entity to work on the project. These people care most about integrability.

      • ecosystem contributors: someone either self-motivated or who receives a reward via some mechanism outside the institution that funds the core developers (e.g. reputation, portfolio for future job prospects, tools and platforms that support a consulting business, etc). These people care most about modularity.

      • feature-driven contributors: The project is useful out-of-the-box for these people and rather than build their own tool from scratch they see that it is possible for the tool to work they way they want by merely contributing code or at least a feature-request based on their idea. These people care most about granularity.

      The above lenses fit the characteristics outlined in the article, but below are other contributor-types that don't directly care about these characteristics.

      • the funder: a company, foundation, crowd, or some other funding body that directly funds the core developers to work on the project for hire.

      • consumer contributors: This class of people might not even be aware that they are contributors, but simply using the project returns direct benefits through logs and other instrumented uses of the tool to generate data that can be used to improve the project.

      • knowledge-driven contributors: These contributors are most likely closest to the ecosystem contributors, maybe even a sub-species of those, that contribute to documentation and learning the system; they may be less-skilled at coding, but still serve a valuable part of the community even if they are not committing to the core code base.

      • failure-driven contributors: A primary source of bug reports and may also be any one of the other lenses.

      What other lenses might be useful to look through? What characteristics are we missing? How can we reduce barriers to contribution for each of these contributor types?

      I feel that there are plenty of motivations... but what barriers exist and what motivations are sufficient for enough people to be willing to surmount those barriers? I think it may be easier to focus on the barriers to make contributing less painful for the already-convinced, than to think about the motivators for those needing to be convinced-- I think the consumer contributors are some of the very best suited to convince the unconvinced; our job should be to remove the barriers for people at each stage of community we are trying to build.

      A note to the awesome folks at Hypothes.is who are reading our consumer contributions... given the current state of the hypothes.is project, what class of contributors are you most in need of?

  19. Oct 2013
    1. we believe that we cannot and shall not fail, or that we shall succeed completely

      confidence is key to success

    1. The most important and effective qualification for success in persuading audiences and speaking well on public affairs is to understand all the forms of government and to discriminate their respective customs, institutions, and interests.

      Is this then the realm that rhetoricians should be well versed in? Aristotle said earlier, or so I thought, that it is no longer rhetoric if the said person knows too much about another subject because they need know only how to argue. So it would seem that law and government are the rhetorician's realm, which makes sense when it comes to cases regarding law. However, that is not all that rhetoricians do.

  20. Sep 2013
    1. When, therefore, the layman puts all these things together and observes that the teachers of wisdom and dispensers of happiness are themselves in great want but exact only a small fee from their students, that they are on the watch for contradictions in words(10) but are blind to inconsistencies in deeds, and that, further , they pretend to have knowledge of the future" but are incapable either of saying anything pertinent or of giving any counsel regarding the present, and when he observes that those who follow their judgements are more consistent and more successful4 than those who profess to have exact knowledge, then he has, I think, good reason to contemn such studies and regard them as stuff and nonsense, and not as a true discipline of the soul.

      Wow! Is that the longest sentence ever??

      When the students observe the sophists living in "great want" (poverty?) but charging little for their services the student recognizes that the sophist is contradictory in nature. When students are more successful than the teachers the teachers are considered to be teaching nonsense.

      I disagree, at least from a modern perspective. Isn't a good thing if a student passes a teacher in success. Isn't it possible for a law teacher to teach a student who goes on to become president or a judge?