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  1. Last 7 days
  2. May 2021
    1. Yet in Harris’s Sinophobic comments about “the rise of China” one can detect the thinking of two fairly forgotten writers on technology: Oswald Spengler and Ernst Jünger. Writing in interwar Germany, these reactionary modernist thinkers, wrote at length about the ways that technology was changing the world. And what Spengler and Jünger both argued was that technology could only be properly harnessed, could only be effectively controlled, if it was done so by “Western” societies. With open xenophobia dripping from their words, Spengler and Jünger warned that “Western” societies needed to master technology lest it should be deployed against them by foreign others.
    2. Thus, these companies have launched a new strategy to reinvigorate their all American status: engage in some heavy-handed techno-nationalism by attacking China. And this Sinophobic, and often flagrantly racist, shift serves to distract from the misdeeds of the tech companies by creating the looming menace of a big foreign other. This is a move that has been made by many of the tech companies, it is one that has been happily parroted by many elected officials, and it is a move which Harris makes as well.

      Perhaps the better move is to frame these companies as behemoths on the scale of foreign countries, but ones which have far more power and should be scrutinized more heavily than even China itself. What if the enemy is already within and it's name is Facebook or Google?

    1. I’ve also written about China’s no less corrosive version of the Internet and how it’s marketed to developing and middle income countries as “Autocracy-as-a-Service”.

      Autocracy-as-a-Service---it's so sad that this apt phrase exists and worse that it has such a benign feeling to it.

      https://onezero.medium.com/now-any-government-can-buy-chinas-tools-for-censoring-the-internet-18ed862b9138

    2. Right now, most of the blockchain mining in the world happens in China, where provinces with the cheapest energy set up mining operations to do the ‘proof of work’ calculations that the dominant paradigm of blockchain requires. Factories that ostensibly make other things now acquire significant computing hardware and dedicate energy in order to, essentially, print money that’s then stored offshore. A recent study shows that 40% of China’s mostly bitcoin mining is powered by coal-burning. We also already know that non-blockchain server farms in cheap energy countries consume so much energy they distort national grids, and throw off huge amounts of heat that then need cooling for the servers to operate, creating a vicious cycle of energy consumption
    1. Eric Feigl-Ding. (2021, February 7). Almost 1 year ago, Feb 26, 2020, authors wrote in a top journal that the coronavirus posed “limited threat outside of China” & “wearing mask in public does not prevent people from getting” #COVID19 ➡️We should have listened to the actual aerosol scientists instead on masks! 🤦🏻‍♂️ https://t.co/CZ93ZYoPdg [Tweet]. @DrEricDing. https://twitter.com/DrEricDing/status/1358289202249691138

    1. ReconfigBehSci. (2021, February 17). The Covid-19 pandemic has accelerated the erosion of trust around the world: Significant drop in trust in the two largest economies: The U.S. (40%) and Chinese (30%) governments are deeply distrusted by respondents from the 26 other markets surveyed. 1/2 https://t.co/C86chd3bb4 [Tweet]. @SciBeh. https://twitter.com/SciBeh/status/1362021569476894726

  3. Apr 2021
    1. (This is for VI 5) I was wondering where/what city Cathay was, and it turns out to be an alternative name for China.Lop is also a city that at the time, belonged to the khan of the Mongols, but the description specifically mentions European traders. This makes me believe that this map was depicting part of the silk road. This is also connected to the reading we did this week, because the city of Lop was owned by the Mongols, and trade between these cities was most likely encouraged by the relative safety of the Mongol era.

  4. Mar 2021
    1. Gita Gopinath. (2021, March 26). Here is a snapshot of the largest producers of vaccines. Much more supply is in the pipeline but all countries will need to share. It is essential to vaccinate the most vulnerable in the world now for the benefit of everyone. The pandemic is not over until it is over everywhere https://t.co/udBMkw6Pnl [Tweet]. @GitaGopinath. https://twitter.com/GitaGopinath/status/1375557532224225282

    1. Coronavirus Pandemic Data Explorer. (n.d.). Our World in Data. Retrieved March 3, 2021, from https://ourworldindata.org/coronavirus-data-explorer

      is:webpage lang:en COVID-19 graph case death Germany Sweden UK Afghanistan Africa Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antigua Barbuda Argentina Armenia Asia Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia Bosnia Herzegovina Botswana Brazil Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Colombia Comoros Congo Costa Rica Cote d'ivoire Croatia Cuba Cyprus Czechia Democratic Republic of Congo Denmark Djobouti Dominica Dominician Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Eswatini Ethiopia Europe Europian Union Faeroe Islands Falkland Islands Fiji Finland France Gabon Gambia Georgia Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Honduras Hong Kong Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran Iraq Ireland Isle of Man israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kosovo Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Laos Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Mashall Islands Mauritania Mauritius Mexico Micronesia Moldova Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nepal Netherlands New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria North America North Macedonia Northern Cyprus Norway Oceania Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philipines Poland Portugal Qatar Romania Russia Rwanda Saint Helena Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Vincent Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South America South Korea South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Switzerland Syria Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania Thailand Timor Togo Trinidad Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turks and Caicos Islands Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates USA Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Vatican Venezuela Vietnam World Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe test vaccine chart map table data case fatality rate mortality

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  5. Feb 2021
    1. Channel 4 News. (2021, January 17). “It’s working in mainland China with 1.4 billion people. It doesn’t depend on being an island.” A pandemic adviser to the New Zealand government says achieving zero cases isn’t about the size of a country, but about “strong leadership”. Https://t.co/SSpc8DjZXi [Tweet]. @Channel4News. https://twitter.com/Channel4News/status/1350834342709358593

    1. COVID, One Year Ago. (2021, February 24). One year ago today: Korea reports 230 new confirmed cases for a new total of 833, now the largest outbreak outside mainland China. 5 days ago, it was only 31 cases. While the majority of the cases are still linked to the Shincheonji church, they are now spread across South Korea. [Tweet]. @covidoneyearago. https://twitter.com/covidoneyearago/status/1364666410341867524

    1. And if you read what the business schools in the late 19th century taught like Simon Patten at the Wharton School, it’s very much like socialism. In fact, it’s very much like what China is doing.

      Interesting statement!

  6. Jan 2021
    1. Scientific work must therefore be spiritually, organizationally, and materially decoupled from the forces of science at scale. The way to achieve this is to give primacy to the organization of small groups and the space for those groups to develop their own norms.

      Which is the opposite of the vision Xi Jinpeng has for science

    2. In our time, machine learning conference attendance and submission rates continue to compound, often outstripping the doubling of Moore's law the discipline relies on to make any forward progress. The quality of results in these and other fields since the vast expansion of their communities has not increased.

      Just wait until you see what publishers have planned for India and China

    1. Wal-Mart, which in the late 1980s and early 1990s trumpeted its claim to “Buy American,” has doubled its imports from China in the past five years alone, buying some $12 billion in merchandise in 2002. That’s nearly 10% of all Chinese exports to the United States.
      • Wal-Mart touts they "buy american" but they doubled import from China in the last 5 years.
      • 10% of Chinese exports is to the US go to Wal-Mart
  7. Dec 2020
    1. “… do not use push notifications, do not post commentary, do not stir up speculation. Safely control the fervor in online discussions, do not create hashtags, gradually remove from trending topics, strictly control harmful information.”

      This sounds hella educational.

  8. Nov 2020
    1. 3. They're fighting misinformation.

      Agree or disagree with how they obtained info and what that means for digital rights; how much the Chinese government informed or not their people - this is what China did in terms of alerting their population of covid cases.

  9. Oct 2020
    1. By 2005 blogs had crashed the cultural gates. China’s editors, station directors, and pub-lishers had always acted as cultural “gatekeepers:” deciding who could and couldn’t becomeknown through publication, TV and film appearances, and musical performances. In a majorcultural power-shift, pop cultural icons could emerge through blogs, forums, chatrooms, andpersonal websites, completely outside of the government approved cultural structures.But while Communist Party propaganda department had lost control over China’s cul-ture, in the realm of politics the gates and walls are constantly being rebuilt, upgraded, andreinforced. It would be impossible for a dissident political leader to rise to popularity in thesame way that Mu Zimei rose to stardom.

      Even though China's publishing class lost control as cultural gatekeepers with the advent of blogs, the Communist Party propaganda department constantly rebuilds, upgrades and reinforces the gates.

    2. This situation is reinforced by recent survey results—surprisingto many Westerners—showing that most urban Chinese Internet users actually trust domesticsources of news and information more than they trust the information found on foreign newswebsites (Guo et al.2005, pp. 66–67).

      Survey results reveal that Chinese citizens trust domestic sources more than foreign sources.

      This is a curious result and something I'm beginning to see in the West. I wonder if it's a result of their policies. I wonder if this means that the filtering and manufacturing of opinion is successful.

    3. While the Chinese government has supportedthe development of the Internet as a tool for business, entertainment, education, and infor-mation exchange, it has succeeded in preventing people from using the Internet to organizeany kind of viable political opposition.

      The Chinese government has succeeded in leveraging the internet to generate economic benefits, without succumbing to its predicted democratizing effects.

    4. They are determined to prevent the Internet from serving as a tool for “colorrevolution” in the way that online media and communication tools empowered activists inUkraine and Lebanon. Thus in 2005 the Chinese government updated its regulations control-ling online news and information, and aggressively leaned on organizations hosting onlinechatrooms and blogs to stop the spread of online discussions about recent local governmentcrackdowns against farmer protests in the Chinese countryside.

      China is determined to not have the internet serve as a tool that helps bring about another color revolution, like in Ukraine and Lebanon.

      In the past they've leaned aggressive on organizations hosting discussions about government crackdowns.

    1. Though government statements emphasize anti-pornography crackdowns, ONI found the primary focus of China's filtering system to be on political content. Public security organs and internet service providers employ thousands of people – nationwide, at multiple levels – as monitors and censors. Their job is to monitor everything posted online by ordinary Chinese people and to delete objectionable content.

      The Chinese government employs thousands of people to monitor and censor content. Their job is to filter out anything objectionable that gets posted.

    1. During her confirmation hearing she did not discuss her family’s extensive ties to the Chinese maritime industry, and she did not disclose the various Chinese accolades she had received. The Senate’s written questionnaire requires nominees to list all honorary positions.
  10. Sep 2020
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