160 Matching Annotations
  1. Nov 2019
    1. a promising technology for decades that's never truly caught on. That's constantly changing with the current wave of VR products,

      PC magazine is a online compuer magazine, based on popular topics ranging form hackers to smartphones.

      Rating: 9/10

  2. Oct 2019
  3. Aug 2019
    1. trials

      Make sure to leave AT LEAST 3/4 page for your intellectual merit/broader impacts section. giving the perception that you're shortchanging these sections or phoning them makes your proposal DOA.

    2. nly a slightloss in accuracy

      If you are describing results, you do not need to actually present numbers. This isn't a paper for peer review, you just need to have your reviewers understand what it is that you're doing. Notice how I don't describe the experiment at all (what kind of task? how were they trained?)

    3. Aim1

      By giving the short description of the aims in the line above, I don't need to repeat them here.

    4. Project Descriptio

      Don't waste space on whitespace, but keep your proposal readable. Double check on the formatting slack they they give you, but head your sections with bold, indented text but don't break the line afterwards. Give a few spaces or a colon and head into the paragraph

    5. 1)

      Don't be shy about numbering arguments in-paragraph, especially in the intellectual merit section. Listing several ideas in sequence makes your writing feel 'blippy' - moving too abruptly. By explicitly offsetting with numbers you implicitly prepare your reader for rapid topic switches. They also take up less space than "this, next, then, last, etc."

    6. Introduction

      Space allocation - 1/3 page intro: you aren't writing an introduction that gets your reader knee-deep in the depth of your project. You want to give them just enough information to motivate your experiment without getting them bogged down in the details. This is easy to overdo - in general if you need more room than this than you aren't writing generally enough.

  4. Jul 2019
    1. at any time, in any place

      Huge thanks to Maha Bali for reminding me to make this point about annotation's capabilities to extend reading across time and space.

  5. May 2019
    1. Well, it’s exactly the approach that I took. I approached this with a scientific mind, like I approach any other problem in astronomy or science that I work on. The point is that we follow the evidence, and the evidence in this particular case is that there are six peculiar facts. And one of these facts is that it deviated from an orbit shaped by gravity while not showing any of the telltale signs of cometary outgassing activity. So we don’t see the gas around it, we don’t see the cometary tail. It has an extreme shape that we have never seen before in either asteroids or comets. We know that we couldn’t detect any heat from it and that it’s much more shiny, by a factor of ten, than a typical asteroid or comet. All of these are facts. I am following the facts.
    2. It’s possible that the civilization is not alive anymore, but it did send out a spacecraft. We ourselves sent out Voyager I and Voyager II. There could be a lot of equipment out there. The point is that this is the very first object we found from outside the solar system. It is very similar to when I walk on the beach with my daughter and look at the seashells that are swept ashore. Every now and then we find an object of artificial origin. And this could be a message in a bottle, and we should be open-minded. So we put this sentence in the paper.
    3. we need to consider the possibility that ‘Oumuamua was sent by aliens, the dangers of unscientific speculation, and what belief in an advanced extraterrestrial civilization has in common with faith in God.
  6. americanlibrariesmagazine.org americanlibrariesmagazine.org
    1. Wi-Fi in the “White Space”Unused TV spectrum offers libraries potential for rural broadband

      Este debate no se ha dado en bibliotecas y resulta muy interesante. Sigue la línea del Foro de Gobernanza de Internet

  7. Apr 2019
  8. Mar 2019
    1. This isn’t technically the last image the rover sent, though. As the fatal dust storm closed in, Opportunity sent one last thumbnail for an image that never went out: its last glimpse of the sun.

      Still sad about it.

  9. Feb 2019
    1. the flyby showed Pluto to be home to cryo- or ice volcanoes, soaring mountains, and flat plains. Its surface is dominated by volatile ices, with large variations in color and albedo. New Horizons also took a look at Charon, the largest of Pluto’s five moons. Charon appears to be loaded with just water ice, absent the other frozen gasses found on Pluto. The most striking feature on this moon is a 600-mile long rift, longer than the Grand Canyon.

      How did I not know that Pluto had 5 moons? Really, I'm slacking on my solar system knowledge!

    1. But on Wednesday, NASA announced that the rover is dead.

      RIP Opportunity, it's been great seeing Mars through your eyes. I hope we can retrieve you someday.

    1. your Friendships arc not cemented by Intrigues nor spent in vain Diversions, but in the search of Knowledge

      Women's rhetorical sphere and a space/place for knowledge/information exchange: women's conversations

    2. became acquainted with other female intellectual leaders such as Lady Mary Wortley Monlagu and Lady Catherine Jones. Astell's new friends respected her learning and intelligence and encouraged her to publish her views.

      We can see how the importance of female-only/female-dominated spaces in Astell's life played a major role in how she envisioned female learning/education could/should look like.

    3. she did not advocate extensive reading. She wanted her program to be within the reach of every woman-

      I'm thinking this is also a nod at the time women had/didn't have because of the various duties they had to fulfill. Also maybe a nod at the fact that women would probably not really have a space/place in which they could extensively read. Yes?

    4. Aslell specified in lhe charter or lhe school that it should alwuys he directed by women.

      And once again, we see how the importance of female-only/female-dominated spaces/places in Astell's life influenced her beliefs on female learning/education.

    1. "Every generation has the obligation to free men's minds for a look at new worlds ... to look out from a higher plateau than the last generation. Your vision is not limited by what your eye can see, but what your mind can imagine. If you accept these past accomplishments as commonplace, then think of the new horizons that you can explore. ... Make your life count, and the world will be a better place because you tried."

      Wow! I never knew this! Heartened.

    2. The ball spent 173 days in space on board the ISS. It orbited the earth nearly 3,000 times, passing auroras and constellations, wonders of the ancient world and sprawling cities of the modern. On April 10, 2017, it returned to Earth, its mission completed.

      Such a nice tribute. So tangible.

  10. Jan 2019
    1. nature—as opposed to cul-ture—is ahistorical and timeless?

      Doreen Massey has an interesting book that touches on this (Space, Place, and Gender), where she points out that time and space are treated as binaries, where time is typically masculine and dynamic and space is feminine and static. Nature (gendered feminine) is spatial, a place, and therefore not a time ("ahistorical and timeless"). Culture, on the other hand, is temporal, dynamic, masculine. It's a very particular rhetoric which begs the "which one?" question.

      (While Massey points out this common way of conceiving of time/space and binaries in general [A vs. Not A], she argues that the concept of space needs to be defined on its own merit, distinct from its binary opposite.)

    1. while brains may be wired to seethe world, how and what is seen is never without a cultural component.

      In my research on coffee talks with Bosnian/Bosniak women, there's a (recent) story I came across in which a family of four (mom, dad, daughter, son) who are part of the diaspora living in America are visited by grandma, who grew up and continues to live in Bosnia. Upon arrival, the grandma witnesses American coffee culture first-hand when her daughter, son-in-law, and grandkids gather around the kitchen table one morning and drink their coffee -- which was made by a machine -- quickly and quietly before running off to work or school. She is deeply horrified -- offended even -- so much so that she shortens her trip from one month to a week. In Bosnia, what kind of coffee you drink, how you make it, who you drink it with, when, and for how long, what you talk about while drinking it -- these are all very significant things. In America, not so much.

    2. Acoustic archaeologists have found that images areoften placed carefully for particular sounds and echoes, underscoring the point that ancientpeoples explored the full potential of the cave environment, including its deep darkness andunique sonic properties.

      This is dope, and it makes me think of the ways in which spaces/places of worship are also spaces/places where acoustic performances happen (sermons, singing of religious songs).

    3. athedrals than anything else. People did not live in the caves,although they sought shelter around them and in their entrances.

      This is similar to the ways in which spaces/places of worship are used today, too.

    4. hese con-ditions are sedimented not solely in cultural narrative, ritual, and practice, but in howthey are made, accumulated, and enacted in (or through) material forms.

      I've been writing and researching about the coffee talks that Bosnian/Bosniak women partake in and how our particular coffee came to be, how and when it affected/s our minds/bodies, and how it allowed for the emergence of a women-only space designed to foster the exchange of information+women's experiences and hold together entire communities. Coffee, for Bosnian/Balkan women, worked by stabalizing networks, and ultimately stabilizing Yugoslavia (you know, before the men and the West kinda fucked things up a bit). My research is ethnographic, and Rickert's argument here comes off a little bit like that.

  11. Dec 2018
  12. neocam.ipac.caltech.edu neocam.ipac.caltech.edu
    1. The Near-Earth Object Camera (NEOCam) is a new mission that is designed to discover and characterize most of the potentially hazardous asteroids that are near the Earth. NEOCam consists of an infrared telescope and a wide-field camera operating at thermal infrared wavelengths.

      Interesting project!

    1. High-priority missions will continue, including a close encounter with a distant object called Ultima Thule, scheduled for 33 minutes past midnight on New Year’s Eve.

      Learn more about Ultima Thule here--the farthest object to be explored by the New Horizons spacecraft.

    2. Frank Borman

    3. Apollo 8 astronauts

      Most of the factoids I know about the Apollo missions come from a book I acquired: Apollo Moon Missions: The Unsung Heroes by Billy Watkins. It was published later as a paperback. by Bison Books and is still available on Amazon. Learn about the frogman who retrieved the astronauts from the sea or the man who decided that they should even have cameras on their voyage (weight was an issue).

    4. The first color image of the earth, taken by the Apollo 8 astronauts in 1968

      It's impossible (for me) to conceive of the distance between the earth and the moon. Three days journey. We're so spoiled by our "fast" travel.

    1. On January 1, the New Horizons spacecraft, the one famous for flying by Pluto, will pass by Ultima Thule to explore this strange rock and try to learn more about the very formation of our solar system.

      So far away!

    1. Launched 15 years ago by the European Space Agency (ESA), Mars Express often focuses on glaciers and ice in the Martian polar regions. 

      How have I never heard of this before?

    1. Apollo 8 was the first moonshot. No human being had ever been beyond low Earth orbit. Even the Apollo 8 astronauts — Frank Borman, James Lovell Jr. and Bill Anders — struggled to wrap their heads around what they were about to do.

      So amazing that this happened at all!

    1. In May, it fired a pair of briefcase-size craft, known together as Mars Cube One, toward Mars — the first miniaturized probes to fly beyond Earth orbit. In October, after a voyage of nearly a half year, one of the twins snapped the first picture.

      Incredibly exciting to see how this will unfold.

    2. Orbiting instruments are now so small they can be launched by the dozens, and even high school students can build them.

      A great way to get students interested in science as a career.

    1. Harvard scientists recently floated the idea that it could be an alien probe. This idea has unsurprisingly been met with its fair share of criticism, and now new evidence from the SETI Institute further supports the idea that ‘Oumuamua is not an alien probe.

      A relief and a disappointment at the same time.

    1. We had come from our home at Clazomenae to Athens, and met Adeimantus and Glaucon in the Agora.

      a specific place. Thinking is being situated. It would be interesting to look at all the incipit of Plato's dialogues

  13. Nov 2018
    1. Five years ago, it was accountable care organizations and value-based purchasing that SHM glommed on to as programs to be embraced as heralding the future. Now it’s the Bundled Payments for Care Improvement initiative (BCPI), introduced by the Center for Medicare & Medicaid Innovation (CMMI) at the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) back in 2011 and now compiling its first data sets for the next frontier of payments for episodic care. BCPI was mandated by the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) of 2009, which included a provision that the government establish a five-year pilot program by 2013 that bundled payments for inpatient care, according to the American Hospital Association. BCPI now has more than 650 participating organizations, not including thousands of physicians who then partner with those groups, over four models. The initiative covers 48 defined episodes of care, both medical and surgical, that could begin three days prior to admission and stretch 30, 60, or 90 days post-discharge. <img class="file media-element file-medstat-image-flush-right" height="220" width="220" alt="Dr. Weiner" typeof="foaf:Image" src="https://www.the-hospitalist.org/sites/default/files/styles/medium/public/images/weinerweb.jpg" title="" />Dr. Weiner “The reason this is so special is that it is one of the few CMS programs that allows providers to be in the driver’s seat,” says Kerry Weiner, MD, chief medical officer of acute and post-acute services at TeamHealth-‎IPC. “They have the opportunity to be accountable and to actually be the designers of reengineering care. The other programs that you just mentioned, like value-based purchasing, largely originate from health systems or the federal government and dictate the principles and the metrics that as a provider you’re going to be evaluated upon. “The bundled model [BCPI] gives us the flexibility, scale, and brackets of risk that we want to accept and thereby gives us a lot more control over what physicians and physician groups can manage successfully.”
    2. “If we can’t build what I think of as a pyramid of care with one doctor and many, many other people supporting a broad group of patients, I don’t think we’re going to be able to find the scale to take care of the aging population that’s coming at us,” she says. Caring for patients once they are discharged means including home nurses, pharmacists, physical therapists, dietitians, hired caregivers, and others in the process, Dr. Gorman says. But that doesn’t mean overburdening the wrong people with the wrong tasks. The same way no one would think to allow a social worker to prescribe medication is the same way that a hospitalist shouldn’t be the one checking up on a patient to make sure there is food in that person’s fridge. And while the hospitalist can work in concert with others and run many things from the hospital, maybe hospital-based physicians aren’t always the best physicians for the task. “There are certain things that only the doctor can do, of course, but there are a lot more things that somebody else can do,” Dr. Gorman says, adding, “some of the times, you’re going to need the physician, it’s going to be escalated to a medication change, but sometimes maybe you need to escalate to a dietary visit or you need to escalate to three physical therapy visits. “The nitty-gritty of taking care of people outside of the hospital is so complex and problematic, and most of the solutions are not really medical, but you need the medical part of the dynamic. So rather [than a hospitalist running cases], it’s a super-talented social worker, nurse, or physical therapist. I don’t know, but somebody who can make sure that all of that works and it’s a process that can be leveraged.” Whoever it is, the gravitation beyond the walls of the hospital has been tied to a growing sea change in how healthcare will compensate providers. Medicare has been migrating from fee-for-service to payments based on the totality of care for decades. The names change, of course. In the early 1980s, it was an “inpatient prospective payment system.”
    3. Dr. Bessler says that as HMGs continued to focus on improving quality and lowering costs, they had little choice but to get involved in activities outside the hospital. “We got into post-acute medicines because there was an abyss in quality,” he says. “We were accountable to send patients out, and there was nobody to send them to. Or the quality of the facilities was terrible, or the docs or clinicians weren’t going to see those patients regularly. That’s how we got into solving post-acute.”
    4. Aside from NPs and PAs, another extension of HM has been the gravitation in recent years of hospitalists into post-acute-care settings, including skilled-nursing facilities (SNFs), long-term care facilities, post-discharge clinics, and patient-centered homes.
    1. An invitation, in Klingon, to attend a performance (on Earth) of a Klingon opera

      This will confuse the hell out of anyone...

    2. The models of three Lego figurines sent with the Juno spacecraft are Galileo Galilei, and the Roman gods Juno and Jupiter.

      So, aliens are going to think we are shaped like lego people?

  14. Oct 2018
    1. In  what I earlier named a bounded-argument space these controls do not have to be  imposed by will because they are built into the structure of the discursive situation.  In a bounded-argument space, the things one is obliged to say and the things one  is forbidden to say are known in advance, either because they are set down in a list  of rules or because they are part of the tacit knowledge internalized by every  competent practitioner.

      Bounded Space definition

    1. Space is not in the subject, nor is the world in space. Space is rather ‘in’ the world in so far as space has been disclosed by that Being-in-the-world which is constitutive for Dasein.

      Heidegger: "Space is not in the subject, nor is the world in space" ||

  15. Sep 2018
    1. Abstract space is the product of a homogenizing power that as-pires to make space entirely transparent and legible, leaving no room for alternative voices.

      Rhetoric of Space and Place.

  16. Aug 2018
    1. Action is but the constant intervention of humans into the natural and social world of events. Giddens adds that he would also like to make clear the constitutive relation between time and action. 'I do not' he says, 'equate action with intentionality, but action starts always from an intentionally-oriented actor, who orients him/herself just as much in the past, as he/she tries to realize plans for the future. In this sense, I believe, action can only be analyzed, if one recognizes its embeddedness in the temporal dimension' (Kiessling, 1988:289).

      Giddens' structuration theory accounts for how social action/practices over time and space.

      Structuration theory = "the creation and reproduction of social systems that is based in the analysis of both structure and agents"

      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Structuration_theory

      Both Adam and Nowotny engage quite a bit with Gidden's structuration theory/time-space distanciation concept, though sociologists are quite critical of the theory. Why?

    2. To show 'how the positioning of actors in contexts of interaction and the interlacing of those contexts themselves' relate to broader aspects of social systems, Giddens proposes that social theory should confront 'in a concrete rather than an abstractly philosophical way' the situatedness of interaction in time and space (Giddens, 1984:110)

      further description of time-space distanciation

    3. The fundamen-tal question for Giddens then becomes how social systems 'come to be stretched across time and space' (i.e. how they constitute their tempor-ality (Giddens, 1984).

      Space-time distanciation theory.

      See also: Adam - 1990 - Time for Social Theory

    1. I am proposing that we need to take on board the time-scales of our technologies if our theories are to become adequate to their subject matter: contemporary industrialised, science-based technological society. Giddens's concept of time-space distanciation might prove useful here despite its association with the storage capacity of information Time for Social Theory: Points of Departure 167 which makes the present application of the concept primarily past, rather than past and future orientated. There seems to be no reason why the concept of time-space distanciation, with its link to power, could not be exploited to theorise influences on the long-term future. Such an extension would allow us to understand the present as present past and present future, where each change affects the whole.

      Adam revisits the need to incorporate technology and artifacts into sociotemporal theory.

      She cites Giddens' time-space distanciation, a construct that describes how social systems stretch across time and space to "store" knowledge, material goods, and cultural traditions.

      https://books.google.com/books?id=MVp0tMD_5f0C&pg=PA90&lpg=PA90&dq=time-space+distanciation&source=bl&ots=DSk71zZ0Gs&sig=2-MPO0zy1efy_5eoJ1u-CwtFp14&hl=en&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwj9kMfYkdXcAhWBIzQIHUlqDG04FBDoATAHegQIAhAB#v=onepage&q=time-space%20distanciation&f=false

  17. Mar 2018
    1. This serendipitous meeting on Steve Wheeler's blog back then was the spark that led to the creation of connected network at a point when I had recently developed an online space using moodle for supporting the teaching of languages at Warwick's Language Centre. The opportunity therefore to connect our student cohorts meant that we could set about creating a shared, large scale virtual exchange. 

      Connection, Unpredictability, Serendiptity, EDTECH developer MOODLE

    1. That’s because Mars, lacking an inherent magnetic field, does not channel the sun’s energetic particles to its poles.

      This is interesting!

    1. "But if I show you a green A, you hate it. I've had to change the colours of fonts on my power point slides in the past when giving presentations to synaesthetes."

      I can't even look at pictorial depictions that run opposite to mine--gives me a headache. Completely different ones don't bother me though.

    2. time-space variant is one of three types that has only been properly described within the last few years.

      So I guess I wasn't really meant to find out until now, because, if I had googled it years ago, I might not have found it.

    1. When she thinks of a date she feels herself travel along the calendar to the right spot. She has a separate, hoop-shaped calendar for days of the week. Both have been part of her life for as long as she can remember.

      I never travel along, but I do see the spot and I can point to it regardless of what year it's in.

    1. When someone mentions a year, I see the oval with myself at the very bottom, Christmas day to be precise. As soon as a month is given, I see exactly where that month is on the oval. As I move through the year, I am very aware of my place on the oval at the current time, and the direction I am moving in.”

      This is very similar to what I experience!

  18. Feb 2018
    1. Indeed, perhaps the most obvious thing to send (though it’s a bit macabre) would just be whole cryonically preserved humans (and, yes, they should keep well at the temperature of interstellar space!). Of course, it’s ironic how similar this is to the Egyptian idea of making mummies—though our technology is better (even if we still haven’t yet solved the problem of cryonics).

      Interesting idea. This would tell aliens a lot about us.

    2. right now there are just four spacecraft outside our solar system (and another one that’s headed there), and there are under 100 spacecraft more-or-less intact on various planetary surfaces (not counting hard landings, melted spacecraft on Venus, etc.). And at some level a spacecraft itself is a great big “message”, illustrating lots of technology and so on.

      A larger collection than I thought.

  19. Jan 2018
    1. However, most of the accretion onto SMBHs is expected to be heavily obscured by dust and gas, making the identification of the most obscured AGN population very challenging, even in the deepest X-ray surveys.

      This is interesting!

    1. The object in question, called 2002 AJ129, will miss Earth by about 2.6 million miles (4.2 million kilometers).

      We live in a dangerous neighborhood.

  20. Nov 2017
    1. he onboard altimeters measured the distance to the instantaneous sea surface with a precision of about 2 cm and helped to better understand global climate change and weather phenomena such as El Niño

      This is interesting!

  21. Oct 2017
    1. The most remote location on Earth has many names: It's called Point Nemo (Latin for "no one") and the Oceanic Pole of Inaccessibility. Most precisely, its exact coordinates are 48 degrees 52.6 minutes south latitude and 123 degrees 23.6 minutes west longitude.

      Space junk cemetery.

    1. Astronomers have now seen and heard a pair of dead stars collide, giving them the first glimpse of what they call a “cosmic forge,” where the world’s jewels were minted billions of years ago.

      Super cool!

    1. Earlier this month, NASA issued a press release stating that it’s likely that our solar system has a ninth planet—even if it’s proving difficult to find.

      Can't wait to find out!

    1. Musk revealed the company’s planned next-generation rocket will make it possible to build a moon base — and the name he picked is just his latest homage to beloved science fiction, in this case, the British cult classic Space: 1999.

      One of the all time best shows! Changed my life!

  22. Sep 2017
    1. In space, bacteria “shapeshifts” to defend itself against antibiotics, experiments on board the International Space Station (ISS) have revealed. The discovery potentially poses a big problem for future space travel—as long duration missions happen more frequently, we will need antibiotics to treat sick astronauts. But if space bacteria is able to quickly and effectively develop resistance, common infections could become deadly.

      This is alarming!

  23. instructure-uploads.s3.amazonaws.com instructure-uploads.s3.amazonaws.com
    1. Third Space

      I don't know if this will bear out but for me a Third Space has a slightly different context.

      My graduate work is a combination of marketing at ASU and educational technology at BSU.

      Third Space in the marketing literature comes out of Bowling Alone http://bowlingalone.com/ and how the white middle and working class moved away from neighborhoods and into suburbia. Putnam, R. D. (2000). Bowling alone: The collapse and revival of American community. New York: Simon & Schuster.

      and also Oldenburg , R. (1989). The great good place. New York: Marlowe & Company. https://www.pps.org/reference/roldenburg/ who wrote about what what essentially was the setting for the Cheers.

      https://youtu.be/4L_vWpTAra8

      https://youtu.be/h-mi0r0LpXo

      In educational technology, online learning and especially research in game based learning

      Online learning communities are looked at as third spaces or third places. There's been a bit written about this especially in the MMO World of Warcraft.

      Steinkuehler, C. A., & Williams, D. (2006). Where everybody knows your (screen) name: Online games as “third places.” Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication , 11(4), 885–909. doi:10.1111/j.1083-6101.2006.00300.x

      http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1083-6101.2006.00300.x/pdf

    1. The UV radiation rates emanating from the host star in the TRAPPIST-1 system are large enough to have caused the planets to have hemorrhaged large amounts of water over time. The inner planets of the system, TRAPPIST-1b and -TRAPPIST-1c, could have lost more than 20 times the amount of water contained in Earth’s oceans over the course of 8 billion years.

      Following the developments on the planets in the TRAPPIST system are so interesting. It's hard to believe that the examination of exoplanets is so recent!

  24. Jul 2017
  25. Jun 2017
    1. The House Armed Services Strategic Forces Subcommittee announced this week that it thinks our space defense capabilities are pathetic, so it set a vote for Thursday to create the U.S. Space Corps, a new military service designed to defend our interests in space.

      Glad they are working on practical things...

    1. Curiosity is heading to the ridge to analyze outcrops upon which the iron oxide hematite has been spotted from orbit. The rover probably couldn’t tell that the orbiter’s High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera was keeping watch over it.

      So cool!

  26. May 2017
    1. If all things go well, we’re about to finally see what a black hole looks like, as the Event Horizon Telescope connects six telescopes sprawled across the world and makes them work in tandem to image the supermassive black hole at the center our very own Milky Way galaxy.

      Black holes

    1. The Curiosity Rover is on an important geological mission in the Bagnold Dunes, collecting samples and climbing the tallest mountain on Mars’ Mount Sharp.

      Love to know that Curiosity motors on!

    1. Impressively, that’s exactly what happened: people spammed the line with stories about space aliens. Which led to an amazing statement from ICE, describing the calls as a cheap publicity stunt “beyond the pale of legitimate public discourse” that is both “absurd” and “shameful.”

      Awesome!

  27. Apr 2017
    1. But on April 13, 1970, an oxygen tank explosion aboard the Apollo 13 spacecraft set a harrowing mission into motion—and its success would turn a team of heartland boys into national heroes. A little more than two days into the mission’s voyage to the moon, the command module began to lose its supply of electricity and water. That’s when astronaut John Swigert uttered the phrase that would implant mission control in the public’s consciousness: “Houston, we’ve had a problem here.”

      Such an amazing story. Heard about it from my dad, before there was a blockbuster book and movie!

    1. An asteroid more than a quarter mile (400 meters) wide will pass close to Earth on Wednesday, zooming by at a distance of just over a million miles (1.8 million km), but with no chance of impact, according to NASA scientists.

      That could have been in the headline!

    1. The SpaceX landing Thursday evening marked the first time in history that a rocket was used to put a satellite into geostationary orbit and then return to Earth.

      A huge achievement!

  28. Mar 2017
    1. It was lovely to smell the toast in a university classroom.  

      learning space

    2. before they stuck a concrete university here.

      boxes natural movement learning freedom

    3. I wandered out of the classroom into the nature on the campus.  I felt the warmth of the Indian Summer on my back, I sat down on the grass.  

      nature ecosystem

    4. Rather than blogging, (I was tired with blogging), I spent my time doing drawing. 

      Time Fallow Rejuvenation Learning Rest

    1. One of Musk’s biggest goals with SpaceX is to get humans to Mars by 2025, nearly a decade ahead of NASA’s current plan.

      That is very soon!

    1. My distant close friends are my fellow explorers in these new spaces of humanity.

      Beyond capitalism and colonialism and exploitation.

    2. What does this say about our desire to connect, to search for meaning?

      Desire to connect

      Desire for meaning.

    1. I am beginning to extend my circles of empathy, I am beginning to see that I am part of a much wider world.

      Reimagining connection.

    2. That comes as a bit of shock. There are suggested readings, links, that comes as a bit of a shock. This is a course, I had forgotten what a course was. I make a mental note. Please try harder to remember that this is a Course.

      Disconnection

      Courses. Mapping. Focus.

    3. A light lit up on the Spaceship's dashboard. It was Susan. Could she connect too? I have no means of picturing Susan's space at the moment she asked that. I scrolled through Susans desperately seeking Susan.

      This space which allows distant people to connect.

      This space which is in between liminal

      Question. What enables people to be able to be at ease in these spaces?

    4. Meanwhile back at the picnic spot, Terry and Keith had turned up. It was six and seven o'clock in the morning for them and they had dropped everything to spend a little time at a picnic to chat with friends.

      Timezone confusion. Competence

    5. Marcin and I's relationship has no doubt been enriched by visiting each other's homes and countries this year, a dream for many people who have extended online personal networks and the ties which bind us I feel are profound - perhaps because of the distance.  There is a part of Poland in me now.

      Being able to picture the person in a physical context in which one has walked.

    6. I was in the room with him from my learning space in Clermont Ferrand. I could hear the bad acoustics of the room in which he was/we were?. We were sharing the slides on the screen in Krakow inside the slide share of our hangout on air.

      Social presence.

      Hybridization.

      Room, space. confusion

    7. I continued the day with a picnic, a #clavpicnic at for me lunch-time. When I arrived at the picnic spot (a hangout) nobody had turned up.

      Imaginary space

    8. It is a shape-shifting space.

      imaginary fluid space

    9. This is clearly not Second Life or the World of Warcraft but a space much more liminal, much more fluid, much more powerful.

      No visualisation of this space. -

      IE mediated by computer programming.

    10. My only way of assimilating what was going on was to imagine a fictional environment in which these characters met, interacted, and played.

      Imaginary fictional environment.

    11. Yesterday, I started the day with a blog post entitled 'In the Tribble Valley' inspired by a series of tweets between people who I had never met

      Imaginary space. What shape does it have?

    12. In thirty seconds, their singing was on the internet winging its way to Egypt, and the USA, and Brazil, and Australia...well wherever.

      Space

    1. Aikido taught me to respect the other as myself.

      Conflict is an opportunity.

      Aikido is a way towards peace but one cannot deny the conflict.

      This is why safe spaces can be exactly the opposite.

    1. these planets are so close that some scientists think microbes could potentially hop from planet to planet and colonize the system outright.

      Not sure that is a good thing?

    1. The ring of material created from the Sun’s interaction with Phoebe results in the largest, most diffuse and outermost ring known anywhere in the Solar System.

      This is so cool!

    1. fast radio bursts sweeping across outer space have puzzled scientists for years, but some scientists are examining the possibility that these millisecond-long radio emission flashes come from advanced alien technology in extragalactic civilizations.

      Need to learn more about these.

    1. On the morning of Feb. 23, 1987, a couple of dozen subatomic particles known as neutrinos zinged through specially instrumented underground sensors in Japan, Ohio and Russia.

      What?

  29. Feb 2017
    1. This Armillary Sphere was made of laser cut particle board.  We debated whether we should build the model out of wood, metal, or 3D print it, but we settled on cutting it from wood.  Once we settled on a material and method of building, we then went through several different images and models to decide how to build it.  The design we went with worked best with a solid stand that would allow the meridian to rotate between the horizon.  Next, we used Adobe Illustrator to create the rings and print the cardinal directions and degrees, which was then cut or etched into the wood by the laser cutter.  The pieces were fit together, and two nails were used to allow the globe and its parts to rotate.  The Earth is a Styrofoam ball suspended by a wooden dowel.  Once the pieces were cut, it was a matter of putting them together and making sure that the zodiac was in the correct orientation.

      This is a fantastic example of what humanities students can do in a maker space.

    1. Menlo Park-based LeoLabs currently tracks some 13,000 objects in low Earth orbit — a zone that extends from about 100 miles to 1,200 miles away from the Earth’s surface and is home to the International Space Station, Hubble Space Telescope and many hundreds of commercial satellites.

      Very important work!

    1. The planets orbit a dwarf star named Trappist-1, about 40 light years, or about 235 trillion miles, from Earth. That is quite close, and by happy accident, the orientation of the orbits of the seven planets allows them to be studied in great detail.

      This is amazing news! So exciting!

    1. The reason we find ourselves in this mess with ubiquitous surveillance, filter bubbles, and fake news (propaganda) is precisely due to the utter and complete destruction of the public sphere by an oligopoly of private infrastructure that poses as public space.

      This is a whole new tragedy of the commons: people don't know where the commons actually are anymore.

    1. According to the Washington Post, this week acting NASA administrator Robert Lightfoot sent a letter to employees saying he’d instructed the top NASA official for human spaceflight to study whether NASA could put astronauts on a lunar orbiter called EM-1—scheduled for launch in 2018.

      Wow! 2018 is soon!

    2. In fact, some space enthusiasts even hope he’ll use the rally to announce a mission to the moon.

      Might be cool!

    1. They looked up at the sky. It was flush with cosmic bodies that had been invisible up to that point — twinkling stars, clustered galaxies, distant planets, even a satellite or two. Then some people became nervous. What was that large silvery cloud that trailed over the city? It looked so sinister they called 911.

      Amazing!

    1. Photos of the comet show that over the past month, it has unexpectedly lost its tail of gas and dust. The images also show that it sports a distinct green hue. As the comet nears the sun, heat vaporizes ices on its surface, which releases pockets of carbon-based gases. These compounds tend to glow green as they are bombarded by sunlight in the near vacuum of space.

      Fascinating!

    2. Over the next few days, sky-watchers will have the chance to spot a pale green comet zipping by Earth as it makes one of its closest flybys in years.

      Wish I could see these!

    1. A collision between Earth and a planet roughly the size of Mars has long been our best working theory for how the moon was formed.

      Good to learn more about this theory.

    1. We’ll be able to directly image Earth-like exoplanets, including Proxima b, out to somewhere between 15–30 light years distant. Jupiter-like planets will be visible out to more like 300 light years.

      Cannot wait!

    2. You can even watch the volcanoes on Io — visible in the infrared — erupting in the process!

      Incredibly cool! Space volcanoes!

    3. the three other famous ones — the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT), the European Extremely Large Telescope (EELT) and Overwhelmingly Large Telescope (OWL) — have either suffered major setbacks or been cancelled entirely.

      Maybe because of their names...

    4. Until we start manufacturing mirrors in zero-gravity, we’ve had two options: cast a single mirror up to the maximum size you can manufacture it — around 8 meters — or build a large number of smaller segments and stitch them together.

      I had no idea that there was a maximum size for mirrors!

    1. Elkins-Tanton has estimated the value of the asteroid’s iron content alone at approximately $10,000 quadrillion. That’s to say nothing of the gold, copper, and platinum to be found.

      Whoa! This is the kind of wealth that drives the sci-fi expeditions to space. Think Alien or Avatar.

    2. 16 Psyche may be a piece of an ancient protoplanet once as big as Mars, which shattered into pieces over billions of years, due to bombardments and collisions with other bodies, a common occurrence after the birth of our solar system. Today, it’s sort of an astronomical fossil.

      I'd love to learn more about these protoplanets.

    3. metallic monolith is so enormous, it’s considered a minor planet.

      Wow. Huge asteroid!

  30. Jan 2017
    1. Year One

      2nd episode to watch should be Production No. 5: "Earthbound".

      Production No. 24: "The Testament of Arkadia" is a fitting end to Season 1."

    1. The relationship between the shear stresses vs the normal stresses will determine the type of fracture seen and it is called the composite failure envelope- KNOW THIS PAGE

      Coulomb failure criterion: shear stress = Cohesion + The multiplication between the normal stress and mu is the coefficient of internal friction.

      KNOW THE SHEAR FAILURE CRITERIA PAGES !!!

      sigma 1- sigma3= sigma failure..... There is a straight line between the failure point of shear stress and the difference between sigma 3 and sigma 1.

      There's failure points of larger differences will be of the same angle... in the diagram it;s about 60 degrees. this is the coefficient of internal friction or mu.

      IF you generate a fault is always 30 degrees to sigma 1 and 60 degrees to sigma 3

    1. Paulo: “But we can also create space inside of the subsystem or the schooling system in order to occupy the space.” (p.203)

      In terms of music space, I think of rehearsal, but rehearsal is made possible by the discipline of practice. They are same coin.

      I live in the composition classroom both online and face-to-face. Are they rehearsal spaces? Yes. What other kinds of space can they be likened to?

      improv? studio? prompt? daily exercises?