58 Matching Annotations
  1. Oct 2019
  2. Sep 2019
  3. Mar 2019
    1. setting up objectives

      How do we augment our ability as humans to set objectives? How do we observe that process? How do we gain insight into hidden aspects and drivers of setting intention? How do we recognize our own framings? How do we re-frame? If the Anthropocene Epoch means anything, it is that our own emoto-cognitive lenses make all the difference.

    2. A composite process, remember, is organized from both human processes and computer processes

      Human-system/Tool-system fine-grained intersections and compositionalities. There are UX and UI levels here. There are likely further levels having to do with intentionalities of (semi-) autonomous Tool Systems, how they are to be guided by Human intentionalities, and - most importantly - how humans fully ascertain and guide their own intentionalities.

  4. Jan 2019
    1. It is a theoretically-powered carto-graphic tool that aims at achieving adequate understanding of theseprocesses of undoing the huma

      posthumanism as a TOOL to understanding

      and creating, as Braidotti says elsewhere

    1. Cognitive tools refer to technologies, tangible or intangible, that enhance the cognitive powers of human beings during thinking, problem solving, and learning.

      constructive tools that extend capabilities, intellectual partners

  5. Dec 2018
    1. ayesian topic mod-els, the most popular such models today are variants of Latent Dirichlet Allocation (LDA, Bleiet al., 2003b), which provides a way to automatically discover latent or implicittopicsin otherwiseunstructured collections of text
  6. Nov 2018
    1. Returns of listing of “required” SPNs for a given computer’s instance of SQL Server. The cmdlet will discover all instances of SQL Server on a given computer name. For each instance found, the cmdlet will generate a list of required SPNs based on active TCP/IP ports. The cmdlet will also warn you if an instance is using dynamic ports. Each returned SPN object will also specify if the SPN is currently set or
    1. So many medical publications appear worldwide every day that it is no longer possible for an individual medical professional to keep up with the latest state of knowledge. In order to offer support and to encourage new medical research, EBM provides a toolbox of different methods. These tools can be divided into three categories:The first category includes methods that serve to create reliable new knowledge: Someone who would like to compare the advantages and disadvantages of different drugs, for example, will find suitable types of studies here.The second category involves methods that help to summarize the existing knowledge on a subject: They serve to find and select the previously published studies that are best able to answer a particular question. There are now networks of researchers that specialize in looking for the latest research findings and summarizing them to provide easily accessible information.The third category covers methods for presenting information to medical professionals and laypeople in a way that helps them to find, understand and make use of it.The main aim is always to find out what kind of care is most suitable for a particular patient – and how to incorporate their individual preferences and circumstances into the treatment decision.
  7. Sep 2018
    1. The merely instrumental, merely anthropological definition of technology is therefore in principle untenable. And it may not be rounded out by being referred back to some metaphysical or religious explanation that undergirds it.

      Saying that the usual and formal definition of Technology as simply a tool or a means to end is untenable, not able to be defended from objection, is to take away Technology's connection to humanity. This is problematic. Technology, at least in the way humanity knows it, would never exist without humans. Sure, if you classify the way an otter uses a rock to open a clam or the way a monkey uses a stick to get ants as technology, then yes it would exist without humanity. However I believe that although technology can be classified as a tool, I do not believe that a tool can be classified as technology. Technology, as defined, is the practical application of knowledge to an area. A tool is a device used to accomplish a task, especially in a profession. The key to Technology is the idea of knowledge. Does an otter have knowledge about the anatomy of the clam or of the physics behind using a rock to open the clam? No, so the rock is a tool. Technology only exists because of Humanity's knowledge, humanity creates Technology as a tool to solve our problems, technology has in its very existence an instrumental definition. Taking that away, takes away it's connection to humanity. It makes it impersonal.

    2. Everything depends on our manipulating technology in the proper manner as a means.

      The author suggests that technology can be both negative and positive. If used inappropriately it can create chaos but if used in the proper way it can be a tool to take humanity to new highs as it has been doing so, so far.

    1. Hal, you have an enormous responsibility on this mission  perhaps the greatest responsibility of any single mission element. You’re the brain and central nervous system of the ship. Your responsibilities include watching over the men in hibernation. Does this ever cause you any lack of confidence?

      Hal is given complete control over the ship and everything inside it, even the people. It is in this way that he is beyond that of a tool. He controls, he is not controlled. As portrayed in the film he can kill any of the crew members any time, which he does, and advises the crew members of what they should do. This is perfectly described in "The Technological Singularity" where the authors states that a super-intelligent AI will be as much of a tool to humanity as we are tools to animals.

  8. Jun 2018
  9. Jan 2018
    1. The central purpose of technologies has not been to provide necessities, such as food and shelter, for humans had achieved these goals very early in their existence.

      In other words, we can't say that a technology was created for doing this or that only. Most of what our technological artifacts are used for is discovered after the tool has been created. What does this mean?

    1. whether available technology tools will enhance or detract from the learning experience.

      Each student learns differently, technology tools will definitely enhance or detract student learning experiences, but it is impossible to say which or to utilize technology in a way that only enhances learning. I think that it is about giving students a chance to find a medium that can be used by all of them.

  10. Dec 2017
  11. Nov 2017
    1. novel method developed within the MAQC-III project utilizing the expression distributions, corrected for noise and batch effects, and assisted by random resampling, to compute DEG scores related to the Wilcoxon U test (Magic, see Additional file 1: Supplementary Note 2)
    1. MOSAiCS implements a model-based approach where the background distribution for unbound regions take into account systematic biases such as mappability and GC content and the peak regions are described with a two component Negative Binomial mixture model
  12. Oct 2017
    1. Like the tools in a toolbox, though, modes can sometimes be used in ways that weren't intended but that get the job done just as well (like a screwdriver being used lo pry open a can of paint).

      An example of a mode being used in an unintentionally effective way would be the aural mode of Flannery O’Connor’s voice as she reads her short story “A Good Man Is Hard To Find.” Before reading the linguistic content of her story, my high school professor played an audio recording of O’Connor reading this story in a ballroom theater.

      O’Connor is a Southern author from Savannah, Georgia, so one of the first characteristics I noticed of her voice was its accent. Next, I noticed the bluntness with which she spoke. Her voice sounded rather dry and sarcastic at times, which perfectly illustrated, even softened the uncomfortable humor present in the story. I became so engrossed with the aural mode of O’Connor’s short story that once the linguistic mode caught up to me, I felt shocked by the grotesqueness of the events unfolding.

      The aural mode of O’Connor’s reading deceived me and lured me into a state of selective-attentiveness, however, this deception worked well to demonstrate the content of her story. “A Good Man Is Hard To Find” is, itself, an illusory and misleading narrative that culminates in a dreadful tragedy which appears quite suddenly and viciously. Until one rereads the story and recognizes the points of foreshadowing present all along, O’Connor’s voice served an unintentional purpose of misleading the (in this case) listener.

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sQT7y4L5aKU

    2. Although most of us arc used to hearing sound all around us every day, we don't often pay attention to how il signals information, including feelings, responses, or needed actions.

      One of the activities in our class textbook, Guide to First-Year Writing (6th Edition), asks us to “consider a song as an argument” (70). This activity (activity 2.12, found in chapter two) requires the participant to locate a song that appears to make an argument and answer the activity’s given questions. For this exercise, I chose the song “Love Is Dead” by Estonian musician Kerli.

      The title alone presents Kerli’s argument: love is dead. Answering the activity’s given questions, however, caused me to contemplate Kerli’s song as a complex communicative device; I soon realized that Kerli’s message is not as simplistic as the title implies. In my response, I hypothesize that Kerli is a mistress who has made the difficult decision to leave a secret relationship. By referencing lyrics that support my interpretation of the song’s argument, I was able to appreciate the narrative present in the song, and analyze its method of storytelling.

      Previously, I felt most drawn to the aural mode of “Love Is Dead,” however, this activity prompted my explicit admiration of the song’s linguistic mode as well. Through the following questions, I discuss how and why the linguistic mode of the song’s argument is supported by its aural mode:

      How would you describe the musical style of the song? In what ways does the style of singing and instrumentation help convey the rhetorical argument?

      Here is a snippet of my response:

      *The composition of the piece seems to describe the navigation of a dangerous path. It’s as if one has to look over one’s shoulder while listening to this song. By employing a sense of danger, the ballad mimics the traitorous and deceptive nature of Kerli’s secret relationship.

      In the song, Kerli’s vocals are slightly distorted. She sounds as if she is singing from behind a glass wall, showing that she is both unsure of the words she is singing to herself, and afraid of being honest about her doubt of the worthiness of her relationship. The instrumentation is forceful and almost overpowers Kerli’s voice at times. One is never unaware of the thematic orchestra scoring Kerli’s ascent through perilous territory. As the song advances, however, Kerli’s angelic voice increases in power. She continuously repeats and chants variations of “love is dead, love is gone, love don’t live here anymore,” alternating between singing these words, chanting them, and crying them to the audience.*

      As this article’s authors point out, the aural mode of media “signals information” even when we are not consciously aware of those signals.

      At first, I only appreciated the superficiality of the composition of “Love Is Dead,” and simply recognized that it sounded good to me. I now realize, however, that the aural mode of the song also performs the deeper, more complex function of storytelling. The sound of Kerli’s song influences the emotions that I feel upon listening, and the imagery I conjure in accordance with the music.

      Read the full response on my website, Postscript Reverie: My Analysis of "Love Is Dead"

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JBDiHFS1TjY

  13. Sep 2017
  14. Aug 2017
  15. Jul 2017
    1. Every designer should have and be comfortable with these tools: Pencil and/or pen Sketch pad Everything after that is a matter of preference or specialization. I've been in this business for 15 years now and I have not met a single designer, art director, or creative director that does their best without first sketching it out. You can jump right into the computer but it's never as free as early concepts should be. As for the other items listed here ... Remember that digital makes up the majority of the market these days. Print isn't dead, but it isn't the only option for professional design. In fact, it's an afterthought much of the time. Pantone? That's for those print junkies. X-acto? Nice, but mostly just for print. Light table, tape, tracing paper, ink erasers!? You guys are as bad as me. That's all for us fussy history buffs. I hardly pull that stuff out any more. My art supplies are more like a museum than a tool kit. They come in handy every few months but that's only when I'm doubling as an illustrator. Or just playing around. I could probably save my clients some money and go buy royalty free icons next time ;)
  16. Jun 2017
  17. Apr 2017
    1. I'm the developer of pyGeno. Here's a little script that does just that for the Gene TPST2, by using segment trees

      recipe for merging transcripts of a gene into a single compound transcript

  18. Feb 2017
    1. The qrecks invented rhetoric to gain power over their ~u~i~!lc,ei,

      This is a fascinating concept; to think of rhetoric as being intentionally invented, or crafted in a certain way, to exclude others in an effort to create societal division and establish hierarchy. I suppose I've typically thought of rhetoric as something that occurs naturally in the world on multiple social levels of understanding and manifestation (and also as something that exists in a relationship of mutuality between the "author/speaker" and the "audience" see: rhetorical triangle), and not as something that was deliberately created as a tool to subjugate others. In fact, as we've discussed in class, the participation or reception of an audience is actually a sometimes necessary contribution to the "rhetoricity" of a speech/text/artwork/etc.

    1. Garrison, although a paternal mentor to Douglass, brooked no deviation from his own doctrines, and he and other while abolitionists apparently wanted little the· orizing from Dougla<;s. His role was to be the eloquent example, literally and figura-tively displaying the scars of the lash to prepare audiences for white speakers who would lay out the abolition philosophy.

      Okay again back to Lorde... Her concern was that feminist theorists had coalesced around a consensus that left out the very voices of those whose difference was essential to the project of overturning the patriarchy. Lorde asked, “What does it mean when the tools of a racist patriarchy are used to examine the fruits of that same patriarchy?” I guess I see a similar flaw in the white abolitionists' dismissal of Douglass, in that oppression cannot be disrupted using the logic that justifies oppression, i.e. the use of Douglass as a black man as "tool" in himself and the exclusion of his very relevant experience from their dialogue; are these not other forms of bondage? Also thinking about how "tool" can be interpreted here, i.e. tool as logic, rhetoric, government, Christianity, whiteness, Douglass himself, etc.

  19. Jan 2017
  20. Oct 2016
    1. The resource-based economy goes like this: In the future robots will do all the jobs (including creating new robots and fixing broken one). Now, imagine the world is like a public library, where you can borrow any book you want but never own it. Fresco wants all enterprise like this, whether it’s groceries, new tech, gasoline, or alcohol. He wants everything free and eventually provided to us by robots, software, and automation.

      I think this is achievable, if we emphasize specialized libraries and cooperative models around resources (i.e. tool/tech libraries, food banks/co-ops)

  21. Jun 2016
    1. Voyant Tools is a web-based reading and analysis environment for digital texts.
  22. Apr 2016
  23. Nov 2015
    1. If you have a copy of the ReSpec repository handy, you may see that there is also a respec2html.js tool under tools/. Feel free to try using it instead of the above process, but please note that it is not used much currently and may behave in a somewhat experimental manner (experiences with it vary — but it's worth a shot if you're looking for a way to generate ReSpec output from the command line).

      Respec (sadly) doesn't quite have a command line tool...at least not one comparable to a browser's output.

      Maybe PhantomJS (which Respec uses for tests) would do a better job?

  24. Oct 2015
  25. Jan 2015
  26. Oct 2013
    1. We must reject food, for it has often given rise to ill health; we must never go under roofs, for they sometimes fall upon those who dwell beneath them; a sword must not be forged for a soldier, for a robber may use the same weapon.

      These are interesting metaphors which suggest rhetoric is a tool or object which is neither inherently good or bac