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  1. Last 7 days
  2. Jun 2020
    1. I could get a lot more done in an 8-9 hour day with a PC and a desk phone than I get done now in a 9-10 hour day with a laptop /tablet / smartphone, which should allow me to be more a lot more productive but just interrupt me. I don't want the mobile flexibility to work anywhere. It sucked in management roles doing a full day then having dinner with friends and family then getting back to unfinished calls and mails. I much prefer to work later then switch off totally at home.
  3. May 2020
    1. Part of the problem of social media is that there is no equivalent to the scientific glassblowers’ sign, or the woodworker’s open door, or Dafna and Jesse’s sandwich boards. On the internet, if you stop speaking: you disappear. And, by corollary: on the internet, you only notice the people who are speaking nonstop.

      This quote comes from a larger piece by Robin Sloan. (I don't know who that is though)

      The problem with social media is that the equivalent to working with the garage door open (working in public) is repeatedly talking in public about what you're doing.

      One problem with this is that you need to choose what you want to talk about, and say it. This emphasizes whatever you select, not what would catch a passerby's eye.

      The other problem is that you become more visible by the more you talk. Conversely, when you stop talking, you become invisible.

    1. kerja remote itu nggak ada templatenya

      Harus mencoba mencari cara yang cocok untuk diri sendiri, bereksperimen dan tingkatkan. Iterasi.

  4. Apr 2020
  5. Mar 2020
  6. Feb 2020
  7. Jan 2020
  8. Oct 2019
    1. Walmart is a place of opportunity. Here, you can go as far as your hard work and talent will take you.Our associates are building better lives for their families, and we’re proud to be a part of their success stories. We’re investing in our associates by offering competitive pay, advanced training through Walmart Academies, career development through our Pathways training program and, most of all, a chance to move up. No matter what goals our associates set for themselves, we want to help them grow professionally and personally. To that end, we offer a variety of education benefits.Training and Opportunity Walmart Academies is an immersive training program that is tied to a working supercenter, allowing associates to receive both classroom and sales floor training in advanced retail skills and soft skills like leadership, communications and change management. In 2018 alone, we trained 450,000 associates including frontline supervisors, department managers and assistant managers in our Academies.A new video game called Spark City lets anyone “play” as a department manager. Through the game, associates enrolled in Walmart Academies learn the same techniques and processes that they will use on the sales floor in real life. The game is free to the public on the Apple app store and the Google Play store.In Walmart’s fiscal year 2019 we promoted more than 215,000 people to higher-paying jobs with increased responsibility.More than 75% of our salaried store management teams started as hourly associates.Store managers, on average, earn $175,000 annually and manage and help mentor 300 associates.Full- and part-time associates are eligible for quarterly bonuses based on store performance. In Walmart’s fiscal year 2019, hourly associates earned nearly $800 million in bonuses.We’ve converted nearly 175,000 associates from part-time to full-time in fiscal year 2019.
  9. Jul 2019
    1. The position of machine products in the civilized scheme of consumption serves to point out the nature of the relation which subsists between the canon of conspicuous waste and the code of proprieties in consumption. Neither in matters of art and taste proper, nor as regards the current sense of the serviceability of goods, does this canon act as a principle of innovation or initiative. It does not go into the future as a creative principle which makes innovations and adds new items of consumption and new elements of cost. The principle in question is, in a certain sense, a negative rather than a positive law. It is a regulative rather than a creative principle. It very rarely initiates or originates any usage or custom directly. Its action is selective only. Conspicuous wastefulness does not directly afford ground for variation and growth, but conformity to its requirements is a condition to the survival of such innovations as may be made on other grounds. In whatever way usages and customs and methods of expenditure arise, they are all subject to the selective action of this norm of reputability; and the degree in which they conform to its requirements is a test of their fitness to survive in the competition with other similar usages and customs.
  10. Jun 2019
    1. A guide to available tools and platforms for developing on Ethereum.

      Exhaustive and incredible list of working software related to Ethereum based blockchains. Certainly a resource we will often refer to

  11. Feb 2019
    1. This is not the first time that the US “common man” has embraced populism. Who said the following? “What are the real issues that exist today in these United States? It is the trend of pseudointellectual government where a select elite group have written guidelines in bureaus and court decisions… looking down their noses at the average man on the street … the auto workers, … the little businessman…” (quoted in Cowie: http://digitalcommons.ilr.cornell.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1919&context=articles) This was George Wallace, in 1972, the year he scored a victory in the Democratic primary in Michigan, due primarily to “working-class” opposition to school busing on the heels of white flight to the suburbs. His “populist” message of “anti-elitism”, “anti-crime” and anti-busing wasn’t openly racist, but that was its content. Dewey Burton, the young male symbol of the 1970s (white) working class followed for years by the US media (as told by Cowie, above) was not a racist in his personal attitudes, but his alienation from ossified New Deal politics within a Fordist economic model that provided “only” high-wage job security (and for fewer and fewer people) manifested itself in a form that is fairly indistinguishable from the suddenly new “revolt” of the white working class in the rust belt in 2016 – and this well before Fordism entered into its terminal crisis later in the 70s.

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  12. Jul 2018
    1. We’ve run into roadblocks, and people really appreciate hearing about them because for the most part they’re running into the same issues
  13. Oct 2017
    1. We are in a moment when telecommuting seems to be falling out of favor. The conventional wisdom about remote work is shifting.  Once held up as the future of work, telecommuting is now viewed as antithetical to the needs of today’s agile organizations.

      Not sure this is a wide-ranging trend.

  14. Sep 2017
    1. “Co-working is about your living, your money-making life,” Smith explained. “And HackerMoms is about the rest of your life. Like all the other parts that get neglected when you’re trying to make money. And, for us, as mothers, the differentiation is not so clear anymore” (Smith and Cook, 2012).

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  15. Jul 2017
    1. Employees under 35 prefer office life to remote working

      According to a recent survey, the younger generation prefer working from the office to remote working, unlike baby boomers, who would rather work from home.

  16. May 2017
  17. Sep 2016
    1. On a global scale, Debord not only views this as a way in which capitalism maintains the society it has created, but also argues that thepeople of anti-capitalist countries must question power instead of accepting reforms. Without the abolition of capitalism or any oppressive order, the working-class continues to struggle within the boundaries imposed on them by the system in place.

      I would like to discuss this further in class. I am just a little confused on how capitalism is oppressive to everyone. As mentioned in another comment, capitalism can allow lower class citizens to work their way up, but it is just very difficult.

  18. Aug 2016
    1. Page 3

      this is a critical juncture in building the next generation of scholarly information infrastructure. The technology has advanced much more quickly than has our understanding of its present potential uses. Social research on scholarly practices is essential to inform the design of tools, services, and policies. Design decisions made today will determine whether the Internet of tomorrow enables imaginative new forms of scholarship and learning – or whether it simply reinforces today's tasks, practices, laws, business models, and incentives.

    2. Page 10

      Borgman on the relationship of knowledge mobilization scholarship, similarities and differences:

      once collections of information resources are online, they become available to multiple communities. Researchers can partner across disciplines, asking new questions using each other's data. Data collected for policy purposes can be used for research and vice versa. Descriptions of museum objects created for curatorial research purposes are interesting to museum visitors. Any of these resources may also be useful for learning and instruction. nevertheless, making content that was created for one audience useful to another is a complex problem. Each field that is on vocabulary, data structures, and research practices. People ask questions in different ways, starting with familiar terminology. Repurpose sing of research data for teaching can be especially challenging. Scholars goals are to produce knowledge for their community, while student schools are to learn the concepts and tools of a given field. These two groups have different levels of expertise in both disciplinary knowledge in the use of data and information resources. Different descriptions, tools, and services may be required to share content between audiences.

  19. Jul 2016
    1. Page 226

      Borgman on why we need a common effort in building a scholarly Commons

      Striking contrast exists between disciplines and artifacts, practices, and incentives to build the content layer. Common approaches are none the less required to support interdisciplinary research, which is a central goal of the research. Scholarly products are useful to scholars and related fields and sometimes to scholars in distant fields as the boundaries between disciplines becomes more porous, the interoperability of information systems and services becomes indispensable.

    2. Page 225

      Here is a great statement as to the need for a self-conscious commons :

      The content layer of the scholarly information infrastructure will not be built by voluntary contributions of information artifacts from individuals. The incentives are too low and barriers too high. Contributing publications through self archiving has the greatest incentives and the fewest barriers, but voluntary contributions remain low. Contributing data has even fewer incentives and even greater barriers. Scholars continue to rely on the publishing system to guarantee that the products of their work are legitimized, disseminated, reserved, curated, and made accessible. Despite its unstable state, the system does exist, resting on relationships among libraries, publishers, universities, scholars, students, and other stakeholders. No comparable system exists for data. Only a few fields have succeeded in establishing infrastructures for their data, and most of these are still fledgling efforts. Little evidence exists that a common infrastructure for data will arise from the scholarly community. The requirements are diverse, the common ground is minimal, and individuals are not rewarded for tackling large institutional problems. Building the content layer is the responsibility of the institutions and policymakers rather than individuals. Individual behavior will change when the policies change to offer more rewards, and when tools and services and prove to decrease the effort required….

    3. Page 184

      In the section “Description and Organization in the Sciences” Borgman discusses some of the ways in which scientific literature is better organized: for example these include uniform language, taxonomies, thesauri, and ontologies.

    4. page 182

      the sciences create a variety of objects the salt in the gray area between documents and data. Examples include Laboratorio field notebooks, slicer talks, composition objects such as graphic visualization of data. Laboratorio notebooks are often classified as data because their records research. Slides from talks, which were once ephemeral forms of communication, now our compost and competent person websites are distributed to accomplish proceedings. Graphic visualization data can be linked to scarlet documents to report research or to the underlying data.

    5. Chapter 8 is an excellent overview of the nature of the commons its differences and similarities

    6. Page 182 Borgman on the disciplinary differences in scholarly practice

      Despite many common activities, both the artifacts and practices of scholarship very by discipline. The artifacts very as scholars make choices about the sources of data, along with what, when, where, and what form to disseminate the products of their work. Scholarly practices vary in the way that scholars create, use, and share documents, data, and other forms of information.

    7. Chapters 4 and 5 the continuity of scholarly publishing and the discontinuity of scholarly publishing

      These are both useful and important chapters for the scholarly Commons working group. They discuss the things that are common across scholarly communication as well as the different functions comma and they also discuss a new technology is disrupting this common area.

  20. Feb 2016
    1. The feed is how stuff enters their content system. But the feed itself is outside, leaving it available for other services to use. It's great when this happens, rather than doing it via a WG that tend to go on for years, and create stuff that's super-complicated, why not design something that works for you, put it out there with no restrictions and let whatever's going to happen happen.

      Interesting approach for hypothes.is to consider?

  21. Oct 2015
    1. Meanwhile I'll use the Spectre x360 with Windows 10, which, despite flaws, is a sweet combination. But the smug superiority I was planning to unleash on my hipster Mac friends will have to wait.
  22. Sep 2015
  23. Aug 2015
    1. Why not enable Slack to search Google Groups directly? Can you, for example, add Google Groups as a provider of results to Slack's search system?
  24. Jul 2015
    1. As Web pages become apps, they will also become collaborative spaces where anyone can annotate -- and the rules of engagement will take a while to work themselves out
    1. http://ssrn.com/abstract=2588493

      Grimmelmann, James. "The Virtues of Moderation." April 1, 2015. SSRN http://ssrn.com/abstract=2588493 keywords: moderation, online communities, semicommons, peer production, Wikipedia, MetaFilter, Reddit 17 Yale J.L. & Tech. 42 (2015) U of Maryland Legal Studies Research Paper No. 2015-8

    1. Resistance to Slack was predictably futile, and now we are assimilated. I was not among the resisters. Nothing floats my boat like powerful team-enabling software, and I'm having a ball exploring the nooks and crannies of Slack.
  25. Jun 2015
    1. I could automate that OAuth interaction with Selenium WebDriver. But that's beyond geeky. I just want to FTP some files! There's got to be an easier way.
  26. May 2015
    1. I've been spending a lot of time lately learning how to use Selenium WebDriver, the premier automation toolkit for functional testing of Web software.

      A /lot/ of time. But it's turning out to be well spent.

  27. Apr 2015
    1. Emerging specs for Web annotation envision standard ways to annotate not only text but also images, audio, and video. As enterprise-grade tools emerge for capturing and annotating meetings, I hope they'll interoperate in standard ways. I also hope they'll be as easy to use as Hangouts on Air.
    1. At the core of that book was a notion that for teams -- and for whole companies -- it would be useful to flip the default privacy setting on electronic communication in the workplace.
  28. Mar 2015
    1. When Facebook announced its impending shutdown of FriendFeed, the chatter was predictable: It was the long-expected end of yet another failed social network. That doesn't begin to explain what FriendFeed's real value was, why that mattered, and how it might be recreated.
  29. Feb 2015