3 Matching Annotations
  1. Aug 2019
  2. Sep 2016
    1. The success of Arduino has had the perhaps retrograde effect of convincing an entire generation that the way to sense and actuate the physical world is through imperative method calls in C++, shuffling bits and writing to ports, instead of in an environment designed around signal processing, control theory, and rapid and visible exploration. As a result, software engineers find a fluid, responsive programming experience on the screen, and a crude and clumsy programming experience in the world.
    2. But the idea that you might implement a control system in an environment designed for designing control systems — it hasn’t been part of the thinking. This leads to long feedback loops, inflexible designs, and guesswork engineering. But most critically, it denies engineers the sort of exploratory environment that fosters novel ideas.

      On short feed back loops and modelling, this talk from Markus Denker, one of the main architects behind Pharo Smalltalk, can be enlightening: Perfection & Feedback Loops, or: why worse is better