8 Matching Annotations
  1. Feb 2022
    1. Even without any feedback, we will be better off ifwe try to remember something ourselves (Jang et al. 2012).
    2. Dweck shows convincingly thatthe most reliable predictor for long-term success is having a “growthmindset.” To actively seek and welcome feedback, be it positive ornegative, is one of the most important factors for success (andhappiness) in the long run. Conversely, nothing is a bigger hindranceto personal growth than having a “fixed mindset.” Those who fearand avoid feedback because it might damage their cherishedpositive self-image might feel better in the short term, but will quicklyfall behind in actual performance (Dweck 2006; 2013).

      Carol Dweck shows that the most reliable predictor for long-term success is what she calls having a "growth mindset" or the ability to take feedback and change.


      This seems related to the idea of endergonic reactions and the growth of complexity as well as the idea of the meaning of life.

      What do these systems all have in common? What are their differences? What abstractions can we make from them?

      Relate this to https://hypothes.is/a/pdWppIX5EeyhR0NR19OjCQ

  2. Jun 2020
    1. Note that we are not making the common argument that making new tools can lead to new subject matter insights for the toolmaker, and vice versa. This is correct, but is much weaker than what we are saying. Rather: making new tools can lead to new subject matter insights for humanity as a whole (i.e., significant original research insights), and vice versa, and this would ideally be a rapidly-turning loop to develop the most transformative tools.
    1. Most people think you build the product then you market it. Thinking in loops means you build the marketing into the product. The product doesn't precede the marketing. The product is the marketing.

      By thinking in loops Harry Dry refers to a way of thinking about your acquisition strategy as being part of your product.

      This reminds me of Brian Balfour's idea of product-channel fit and how stresses that the product gets shaped by its acquisition channel.

  3. May 2020
    1. Ericsson claims (2016, p. 98) that there is no deliberate practice possible for knowledge work because there are no objective criteria (so, poor feedback), because the skills aren’t clearly defined, and because techniques for focused skill improvement in these domains aren’t known.

      According to Ericsson deliberate practice for knowledge work is not possible because the criteria are not objective (you don't know if you're doing well).

      This collides with Dr. Sönke Ahrens' contention that note taking, specifically elaboration, instantiates two feedback loop. One feedback loop in that you can see whether you're capturing the essence of what you're trying to make a note on and a second feedback loop in that you can see whether your note is not only an accurate description of the original idea, but also a complete one.

      Put differently, note taking instantiates two feedback loops. One for precision and one for recall.

  4. Aug 2019
  5. Sep 2016
    1. The success of Arduino has had the perhaps retrograde effect of convincing an entire generation that the way to sense and actuate the physical world is through imperative method calls in C++, shuffling bits and writing to ports, instead of in an environment designed around signal processing, control theory, and rapid and visible exploration. As a result, software engineers find a fluid, responsive programming experience on the screen, and a crude and clumsy programming experience in the world.
    2. But the idea that you might implement a control system in an environment designed for designing control systems — it hasn’t been part of the thinking. This leads to long feedback loops, inflexible designs, and guesswork engineering. But most critically, it denies engineers the sort of exploratory environment that fosters novel ideas.

      On short feed back loops and modelling, this talk from Markus Denker, one of the main architects behind Pharo Smalltalk, can be enlightening: Perfection & Feedback Loops, or: why worse is better