5 Matching Annotations
  1. Jun 2021
    1. Writing in them is the closest I come to regular meditation; marginalia is — no exaggeration — possibly the most pleasurable thing I do on a daily basis.

      Annotation can be creative and fun. Doing it not only increases one's engagement with a text, but it helps to create flow in one's work.

    1. Ong puts it this way:“Ramus can adopt memory intodialectic because his entire topically conceived logic is itself a system of local memory”(Ramus280).However, it is a simplified systemunlike the classical one: The ancient precepts about images and theirfacilitation of invention have been dropped.

      What is gained and lost in the Ramist tradition versus the method of loci?

      There is some simplicity to be sure and structure/organization aid in the structured memory.

      We lose the addition work, creativity, and invention. We also loose some of the interest that students might have. I recently read something to the effect that we always seem to make education boring and dull. (cross reference this, which I haven't read: https://daily.jstor.org/why-school-is-boring/)

      How does this interact with Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi's idea of flow? Does Ramism beat out the fun of flow?

      How also, is this similar to Kelly's idea of the third archive as a means of bringing these all back together?

  2. Oct 2020
    1. At the same time, a positive emotional experience alone is not enough. For tools for thought to attain enduring power, the user must experience a real growth in mastery, an expansion in their ability to act. And so we’d like to take both the emotional and intellectual experience of tools for thought seriously.

      How can they also reach the idea of "flow"?

  3. Apr 2020
    1. Revisiting a landmark always suggests closure, prematurely inviting the reader to leave the hypertext and do something else.

      Of course if we can create a stream of posts, perhaps the reader will gain Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi's concept of "flow" and therefore never leave?

  4. Dec 2019
    1. I'm not sure if it's blogging's fault, or journalism's fault or even Google's fault — but I do think the focus on recency as the biggest defining value of content is an error, and if we continue too far down that path, we'll regret it.

      Some of the addiction to recency may be related to Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi's idea of "flow". It takes way more work to find good stuff that's older and if this breaks one's flow, then one may be more likely to be addicted to the faster speed of something like Twitter or Facebook that will algorithmicly serve up things you're more prone to like and say within tighter flow boundaries, right?