129 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. “In the last decade, especially with the pioneering work of Thomas Piketty and his co-authors, there has been a growing consensus that tax cuts for the rich lead to higher income inequality,” Hope and Limberg said.
  2. Feb 2021
    1. Even worse, Shadow Stat's numbers show so much inflation the past 25 years that, as Jim Pethokoukis points out, it implies the economy hasn't grown at all during that time.

      Important Point

      Real economic numbers validate a 25 year period (or more) of manipulated inflation and low growth economy. INCOME INEQUALITY statistics and recent studies ALL validate fuzzy math, rosy picture for the 1% and stagnant dismal picture for average Americans. Trump based his entire campaign and Presidency on Making America Great Again

      Supporting Link

    2. So which seems likelier: that we're no better off than we were a quarter century ago, or that Shadow Stats is total bunk?

      Great Question

      This is an easy question to answer from my perspective. For me (age 62) and most of my peers, their kids and their peers, we are NO better off than we were a quarter century ago! A large part is the change from Industrial/Manufacturing to Technology and the outsourced labor and manufacturing. America has changed, this is FACT

    1. Wiley  

      Similar to CUP and IOP, Sage, and Springer Nature, many UK institutions have signed a contract to fund Wiley's publishing activities for four more years as a result of Plan S, regardless of how many authors accepted manuscripts (AAM) are openly available in repositories. This fact undermines the arguments made above by the STM Association about the rights retention strategy (RRS) undermining financial sustainability.

      Furthermore, the financial credit cap for the Wiley deal is operationally low, resulting in additional expenditure for institutions at the end of the calendar year when open access support funds are running low. This additional cost is not sustainable for many institutions and unintentionally creates inequitable access to no-additional-cost publishing.

    2. Springer Nature  

      UK institutions have been through several terms of the Springer Compact deal and continue to negotiate amendments and additional terms with added expense. The Springer Compact deal delivers no-additional-cost publishing for an upfront commitment of funds by institutions. Regardless of how many authors accepted manuscripts (AAM) are openly available in repositories institutions continue to support Springer Nature's publishing activities. This fact undermines the arguments made above by the STM Association about the rights retention strategy (RRS) undermining financial sustainability.

    3. SAGE Publishing  

      Similar to CUP and IOP, many UK institutions have signed a contract to fund Sage's publishing activities for three years as a result of Plan S, regardless of how many authors accepted manuscripts (AAM) are openly available in repositories. This fact undermines the arguments made above by the STM Association about the rights retention strategy (RRS) undermining financial sustainability.

    4. IOP Publishing

      Similar to CUP, some UK institutions have signed a contract to fund IOP's publishing activities for four years as a result of Plan S, regardless of how many authors accepted manuscripts (AAM) are openly available in repositories. This fact undermines the arguments made above by the STM Association about the rights retention strategy (RRS) undermining financial sustainability.

    5. Cambridge University Press

      Many UK institutions have signed a contract to fund CUP's publishing activities for four years as a result of Plan S, regardless of how many authors accepted manuscripts (AAM) are openly available in repositories. This fact undermines the arguments made above by the STM Association about the rights retention strategy (RRS) undermining financial sustainability.

    6. eliminates the ability to charge for the services that publishers provide

      This is an inaccurate statement or at the very least misrepresents the situation. Despite the Rights Retention Strategy (RRS), publisher may - and many do - continue to charge page charges, over-run charges, colour charges, submission fees, society fees, etc. to the author. The author may also choose to pay an open access article processing charge (APC), without using their funder's money. Furthermore, the RRS does not eliminate the publisher charging subscription fees, licensing fees for the reproduction of content (e.g. figure resue), access to meta-content, docdel etc. or, indeed, individual access to the version of record (VoR) where a reader has identified a need to see the VoR after seeing the authors accepted manuscript (AAM)

    7. The Rights Retention Strategy provides a challenge to the vital income that is necessary to fund the resources, time, and effort to provide not only the many checks, corrections, and editorial inputs required but also the management and support of a rigorous peer review process

      This is an untested statement and does not take into account the perspectives of those contributing to the publishers' revenue. The Rights Retention Strategy (RRS) relies on the author's accepted manuscript (AAM) and for an AAM to exist and to have the added value from peer-review a Version of Record (VoR) must exist. Libraries recognise this fundamental principle and continue to subscribe to individual journals of merit and support lucrative deals with publishers. From some (not all) librarians' and possibly funders' perspectives these statements could undermine any mutual respect.

  3. Jan 2021
  4. Dec 2020
    1. wealth persist across racial groups.

      EXAMINE THE SYSTEMS WHICH HELP TO ENFORCE THIS RACIAL INCOME DIVIDE! Most relate. Fixing these systems could help to bridge the income gap between racial groups. Even laws so ingrained in us.

  5. Oct 2020
    1. James Bronterre O’Brien, told the people:‘Knaves will tell you that it is because you have no property, you are unrepresented. I tell you on the contrary, it is because you are unrepresented that you have no property …’16

      great quote

    2. A thousand years ago, the world was flat, economically speaking.

      I don't think we have to go back even this far. If I recall correctly, even 150 years ago the vast majority of the world's population were subsistence farmers. It's only been since the 20th century and the increasing spread of the industrial revolution that the situation has changed:

      Even England remained primarily an agrarian country like all tributary societies for the previous 4,000 years, with ca. 50 percent of its population employed in agriculture as late as 1759.

      --David Christian, Maps of Time (pp 401) quoting from Crafts, British Economic Growth, pp. 13–14. (See also Fig 13.1 Global Industrial Potential from the same, for a graphical indicator.

    1. Piketty, however, sees inequality as a social phenomenon, driven by human institutions. Institutional change, in turn, reflects the ideology that dominates society: “Inequality is neither economic nor technological; it is ideological and political.”
    2. For Piketty, rising inequality is at root a political phenomenon. The social-democratic framework that made Western societies relatively equal for a couple of generations after World War II, he argues, was dismantled, not out of necessity, but because of the rise of a “neo-proprietarian” ideology. Indeed, this is a view shared by many, though not all, economists. These days, attributing inequality mainly to the ineluctable forces of technology and globalization is out of fashion, and there is much more emphasis on factors like the decline of unions, which has a lot to do with political decisions.
  6. Sep 2020
  7. Aug 2020
    1. Hogan, A. B., Jewell, B. L., Sherrard-Smith, E., Vesga, J. F., Watson, O. J., Whittaker, C., Hamlet, A., Smith, J. A., Winskill, P., Verity, R., Baguelin, M., Lees, J. A., Whittles, L. K., Ainslie, K. E. C., Bhatt, S., Boonyasiri, A., Brazeau, N. F., Cattarino, L., Cooper, L. V., … Hallett, T. B. (2020). Potential impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on HIV, tuberculosis, and malaria in low-income and middle-income countries: A modelling study. The Lancet Global Health, 0(0). https://doi.org/10.1016/S2214-109X(20)30288-6

  8. Jul 2020
    1. Your deductible medical expenses include unreimbursed medical expenses that are deductible on Schedule A. You can include medical expenses and copayments for you, your spouse, and your dependents. You can only deduct the part of your expenses that exceed 7.5% of your adjusted gross income. Enter the full amount of your medical expenses, and we'll calculate if the medical expenses are more than 7.5% of your adjusted gross income. The definition of what constitutes a medical expense is very broad and includes expenses to diagnose, cure, mitigate, treat, or prevent disease. However, cosmetic surgery is not deductible unless it is related to disfigurement from a congenital abnormality, accidental injury, or a disfiguring disease. Other examples of nondeductible medical expenses are nonprescription drugs, doctor prescribed travel for "rest", and expenses for the improvement of your general health such as a weight-loss program or health club fees (the weight-loss program is deductible if it is to treat a specific disease). Examples of deductible medical expenses include: Abortions Acupuncture Alcoholism treatment Ambulance costs Birth control pills Child birth classes Chiropractors Contact lenses Crutches Dentist Dentures Doctor fees Drug addiction treatment Prescription drugs Dyslexia reading programs and tutors Eye examination and glasses Guide dogs Health insurance Hearing aids Hospital bills Insulin Laboratory fees Long-term care insurance Nursing home if for medical treatment Optometrist Osteopath Physical therapy Psychiatrist Psychologist Travel to medical clinics Vasectomy Wheelchair
    1. What types of income are NOT taxable? Don't overpay the IRS by including nontaxable income on your tax return. The following income is generally NOT taxable income. There are always exceptions. For example, inheritances are generally not taxable, but if you inherited an IRA account, you will be taxed when you receive IRA distributions. But for most people, these types of income are NOT taxable: Life insurance proceeds IRA and Pension rollovers Child support payments Inheritances Gifts Workers Compensation Disability payments if you paid the premiums on the policy. If your employer paid the policy, then the disability payments are taxable. If you paid part of the policy, then part of the disability payments you paid are nontaxable. Court damages or settlements for personal physical injuries or physical sickness. Punitive payments are taxable. Health and accident benefits Federal income tax refund State income tax refund (if you took the standard deduction last year) Most scholarships, fellowships, and Pell grants Foster care payments (certain restrictions for individuals over age 18 in foster care) Gain on the sale of your personal residence is usually nontaxable. The gain might be taxable if you lived in the residence less than two years or if the residence has ever been used as a rental property or home office Roth IRA qualified distributions Welfare payments Supplemental Security Income (SSI) Social security benefits (including SSDI) are either nontaxable or partially taxable. Enter your social security benefits on the Social Security Benefits screen and we'll calculate how much, if any, of your benefits are taxable Cancellation of debt because of bankruptcy or insolvency. Enter your 1099-C or 1099-A on the Canceled Debt (1099-C or 1099-A) Information screen and we'll calculate how much, if any, of the canceled debt is taxable Veterans Administration disability benefits Pay-for-Performance Success Payments that reduce the principal balance of your home mortgage under the Home Affordable Modification Program Black lung benefits Cash rebates. For example, if you receive a cash rebate of $100 after you purchase a new washing machine Insurance proceeds for theft or damage to your property Utility rebates Long-term care insurance benefits Military allowances Peace Corps living allowances Reimbursement for medical care Certain individual care provider income Disaster relief payments
  9. Jun 2020
  10. May 2020
  11. Apr 2020
  12. Dec 2019
    1. There are several itemizable tax deductions, but the bulk of most taxpayers' deductions come from the "big four": Mortgage interest on as much as $750,000 in principal. Medical expenses in excess of 10% of your AGI. State and local taxes (SALT), including property taxes and state income or sales taxes, up to a maximum of $10,000 per year. Charitable contributions. For most Americans, adding up these four deductions can be a good indicator of whether itemizing will be worthwhile
  13. Oct 2019
  14. Aug 2019
    1. The tax burden would be enormous, roughly doubling the current tax obligations for today’s taxpayers. One funding option Sanders proposes is a 7.5 percent payroll tax, plus a 4 percent income tax on all Americans, as well as a wide variety of specialized taxes on investments and taxes targeted to higher-income Americans.

      According to the analysis above, it can be said that the "Single-payer" system aims to reduce costs for users but ultimately has a higher tax rate than the conventional healthcare system.