15 Matching Annotations
  1. Jul 2020
  2. Jun 2020
  3. May 2020
  4. Apr 2020
  5. Dec 2019
  • Aug 2018
    1. Anomie (/ˈænəˌmi/) is a "condition in which society provides little moral guidance to individuals".[1] It is the breakdown of social bonds between an individual and the community, e.g., under unruly scenarios resulting in fragmentation of social identity and rejection of self-regulatory values.

      I can't help but see this definition and think it needs to be applied to economics immediately. In particular I can think of a few quick examples of economic anomie which are artificially covering up a free market and causing issues within individual communities.

      College Textbooks: Here publishers are marketing to professors who assign particular textbooks and subverting students which are the actual market and consumers of those textbooks. This causes an inflated market and has allowed textbook prices to spiral out of control.

      The American Health Care Market In this example, the health care providers (doctors, hospitals, etc.) have been segmented away from their consumers (patients) by intermediary insurance companies which are driving the market to their own good rather than a free-er set of smaller (and importantly local) markets that would be composed of just the sellers and the buyers. As a result, the consumer of health care has no ability to put a particular price on what they're receiving (and typically they rarely ever ask, even more so when they have insurance). This type of economic anomie is causing terrific havoc within the area.

      (Aside: while the majority of health care markets is very small in size (by distance), I will submit that the advent of medical tourism does a bit to widen potential markets, but this segment of the market is tiny and very privileged in comparison.)

  • May 2018
    1. Further, a doctor, medical center, hospital, EMT, and even assisted living staff can make decisions regarding your healthcare, treatment methods and type of medical care to provide you if you are not married, over 18 years old, and do not have a health care proxy in place

      Medical decision making has very specific in rules to protect the rights of the patient. The rules can vary according to a patient's age, marital status, and wether or not they signed a health care proxy document in the first place.

    2. Who would decide what was best for you? Who would advocate on your behalf?

      This is a scary question that most people in the United States have to consider at one point in their life. Trust in the person in charge of making medical decisions is essential.

    3. Health care proxy: An advance medical directive in the form of a legal document that designates another person (a proxy) to make health care decisions in case a person is rendered incapable of making his or her wishes known.

      The medical definition of a health care proxy- a legal medical document that transfers power of medical decision making from a patient to a trusted person.

    1. The question each proxy should ask when making decisions on behalf of others is, who am I truly serving — the patient or myself?

      This article really high lights the potential negatives of the concept of healthcare proxies and provides real life scenarios to help the reader relate.

    2. When the patient is unwilling or unable to make medical decisions, the health care proxy is activated and he or she is obligated to make all health choices on behalf of the patient. These may be related to withdrawing or withholding life support, instituting artificial liquid feeding, attempting resuscitation and even whether or not to participate in autopsy and organ donation.

      Any decisions regarding the care and body of the patient are headed over to their health proxy, who assumes any medical decision making responsibilities from there.