26 Matching Annotations
  1. Apr 2019
    1. hire of a harp

      The harp was considered a particularly graceful and feminine instrument, permitting elible young women to show off their charms and attract potential suitors. Many upper-class women, especially those in boarding schools, learned how to play instruments like the harp to make themselves more appealing in the marriage market.

      Read more about the harp as status symbol here

    2. He had been an elderly man when she married him, her own age about thirty.

      This was an odd match for the time. In Regency England, the average age of marriage was between 23 and 27 for women and between 25 and 29 for men.

      Source

  2. Dec 2018
    1. buried two husbands

      This is the first remarried woman in Austen's writing. While it was discussed in Persuasion, it was in much more generic terms, and mostly regarding men. This is an interesting dynamic.

    2. Mr. Arthur Parker

      Mr. Arthur Parker seems interested in the Miss Beauforts as earlier he thought a short walk to Trafalgar to be a lot of exercise, but he is willing to do a bit more to see the ladies. He is one of several single men in Sanditon and he is likely a contender to be a part of a marriage plot. This is assuming that, like all of Austen's other novels, Sanditon contains a marriage plot.

    3. unfavourably

      The question is why Charlotte should view the meeting between Sir Edward and Miss Clara Brereton as bad for the latter. Is it because Charlotte already formed an unfavourable opinion of Sir Edward as being a lover of Miss Clara's while talking "nonsense" to Charlotte in order to annoy Clara and appear an admirer of hers too? Charlotte finds Sir Edward tiring and may think he is, despite his title, beneath Clara. However, Charlotte does note that Clara's poverty makes her acceptance of Sir Edward's attentions more understandable. If so, then Austen is acknowledging the need for women to consider economic benefits to marriage, while also possibly giving her support to the idea of love in marriage.

    4. poor cousin living with her

      I predict that this character will be relevant to the marriage plot. The idea of a young person in this kind of circumstance reminds us of the Crawfords or Catherine Moreland. Single individuals living with relatives have, in other Austen novels, been very relevant in the marriage plots.

    5. Charlotte listened

      This chapter is extremely unusual. It's been almost entirely exposition, but now we're tossed back into a scene in which Charlotte is listening.

    6. Links to common words/themes throughout the annotations

    7. poor man

      These are not established charities. Diana is simply naming families that have faced hardship.

    8. charitable subscriptions

      Mr. Parker is asking his wife to solicit Lady Denham for charitable donations.

  3. Aug 2018
  4. course-computational-literary-analysis.netlify.com course-computational-literary-analysis.netlify.com
    1. A light fringe of snow lay like a cape on the shoulders of his overcoat and like toecaps on the toes of his goloshes; and, as the buttons of his overcoat slipped with a squeaking noise through the snow-stiffened frieze, a cold, fragrant air from out-of-doors escaped from crevices and folds.

      Here we find yet another personification of air, which enwraps the story with subtle layers of movement and circulation. We could trace this pattern, and its effects on narrative time and narrative progress, through concordances and dispersion plots of "air" and any wind-related words.

    2. It was a bright Sunday morning of early summer, promising heat, but with a fresh breeze blowing. All the windows of the boarding house were open and the lace curtains ballooned gently towards the street beneath the raised sashes.

      The windows allow a "fresh breeze" to enter Mrs. Mooney's house, opening up a circulatory channel between the house's interior and the summery world that surrounds it. A concordance and dispersion plot of the word "window" would allow us to trace the figure of the window across all of the stories. After all, the window paradoxically enables characters like Eveline to behold the outside world--and all of the openings and escapes that the view suggests--but blocks immediate access to wider horizons.

  5. Jul 2018
    1. But if it had been cold in the cabin, on deck it was like ice. The sun was not up yet, but the stars were dim, and the cold pale sky was the same colour as the cold pale sea. On the land a white mist rose and fell. Now they could see quite plainly dark bush. Even the shapes of the umbrella ferns showed, and those strange silvery withered trees that are like skeletons... Now they could see the landing-stage and some little houses, pale too, clustered together, like shells on the lid of a box. The other passengers tramped up and down, but more slowly than they had the night before, and they looked gloomy.

      This interlude slows the narrative down with sensory details that evoke unease and gloom: from the icy air, to the skeleton-like trees, to the clustered houses, to the trudging passengers, the reader cannot help but anxiously anticipate the events and conversations that will follow. We can broaden our exploration of how the story creates this mood by tracing the words "cold," "pale," and "dark" with word counts, concordances, and dispersion plots.

    2. pale

      This word occurs five times in this story, both as a verb (i.e., to become pale, or to appear less important and remarkable in comparison to something else) and as a drab color. Along with a concordance, a dispersion plot with "pale" and the more vibrant colors that populate the story would illuminate the visual, textural, and perhaps symbolic significance of paleness.

    3. flushed

      The motif of facial flushing/blushing would be interesting to trace with a concordance and dispersion plots. What are the material, affective, and characterological causes and significances of blushing in this story? Put more simply, when and why do women blush?

    4. She tugged at his sleeve, and to his astonishment, this time, instead of laughing, she looked like a little girl who was going to cry.

      Throughout the story, the narrator references specific parts of articles of clothing (e.g., "collar," "sleeve," etc.). We could use concordances and dispersion plots to trace this clothing motif and begin to investigate its material and affective significances.

  6. course-computational-literary-analysis.netlify.com course-computational-literary-analysis.netlify.com
    1. I read those miraculous words with an emphasis which did them justice, and then I looked him severely in the face. “NOW, sir, do you believe in ROBINSON CRUSOE?” I asked, with a solemnity, suitable to the occasion.

      This is the thirtieth and final time that the word "justice" appears in The Moonstone. What does "justice" mean in this text? In what ways does the novel's conclusion do (or fail to do) "justice" to the narrative buildup? What do different characters mean when they mention "justice"? What would a concordance and dispersion plot illuminate about the linguistic and conceptual workings of "justice" throughout The Moonstone?

  7. Mar 2018
    1. I became the husband of Bertha.

      This romance is such a fast paced roller coaster of emotions. It's very hard to keep up with the characters and their motives.

  8. Sep 2017
    1. My focus on Charlotte Lucas resonates with recent critical trends that depart from the assumption that the novel’s telos, particularly as revealed in the courtship plot, is the representation of personhood through characterological depth and interiority

      One of the main purposes of the article. Moe sets out to oppose, or at least challenge, previous readings of the novel (and is thus her placement within a scholarly discourse), to reconsider how actions of "characterological depth and interiority" are formed within the courtship plot, and how it is impacted by cultural modernity. She does this through a reading of Charlotte Lucas.

  9. Apr 2017
    1. He lay there he did not know how long. He strained his ears to catch the sound of the train, but he heard nothing more than a vague rattling and buzzing far off . . . Presently he grew tired of lying down there. He rose and walked back to the station. There was a good crowd on the platform. He asked someone, ‘What has happened to the train?’‘A goods train has derailed three stations off, and the way is blocked. They have sent up a relief. All the trains will be at least three hours late today . . .’‘God, you have shown me mercy!’ Rama Rao cried, and ran home.His wife was waiting at the door, looking down the street. She brightened up and sighed with relief on seeing Rama Rao. She welcomed him with a warmth he had not known for over a year now. ‘Oh, why are you so late today?’ she asked. ‘I was somehow feeling very restless the whole evening. Even the children were worried. Poor creatures! They have just gone to sleep.’When he sat down to eat she said, ‘Our tenants in the Extension bungalow came in the evening to ask if you would sell the house. They are ready to offer good cash for it immediately.’ She added quietly, ‘I think we may sell the house.’‘Excellent idea,’ Rama Rao replied jubilantly. ‘This minute we can get four and a half thousand for it. Give me the half thousand and I will go away to Madras and see if I can do anything useful there. You keep the balance with you and run the house. Let us first move to a better locality . . .’‘Are you going to employ your five hundred to get more money out of crossword puzzles?’ she asked quietly. At this Rama Rao felt depressed for a moment and then swore with great emphasis, ‘No, no. Never again.’

      So fate offers a twist just at the most crucial point.

    2. People came to him when the patient was on his last legs. Dr Raman often burst out, ‘Why couldn’t you have come a day earlier?’ The reason was obvious—visiting fee twenty-five rupees, and more than that, people liked to shirk the fact that the time had come to call in Dr Raman; for them there was something ominous in the very association. As a result, when the big man came on the scene it was always a quick decision one way or another. There was no scope or time for any kind of wavering or whitewashing. Long years of practice of this kind had bred in the doctor a certain curt truthfulness; for that very reason his opinion was valued; he was not a mere doctor expressing an opinion but a judge pronouncing a verdict. The patient’s life hung on his words. This never unduly worried Dr Raman. He never believed that agreeable words ever saved lives. He did not think it was any of his business to provide comforting lies when as a matter of course nature would tell them the truth in a few hours. However, when he glimpsed the faintest sign of hope, he rolled up his sleeve and stepped into the arena: it might be hours or days, but he never withdrew till he wrested the prize from Yama’s hands.Today, standing over a bed, the doctor felt that he himself needed someone to tell him soothing lies. He mopped his brow with his kerchief and sat down in the chair beside the bed. On the bed lay his dearest friend in the world: Gopal. They had known each other for forty years now, starting with their kindergarten days. They could not, of course, meet as much as they wanted, each being wrapped in his own family and profession. Occasionally, on a Sunday, Gopal would walk into the consulting room and wait patiently in a corner till the doctor was free. And then they would dine together, see a picture and talk of each other’s life and activities. It was a classic friendship, which endured untouched by changing times, circumstances and activities.

      Notice in this exposition how the writer covers an expanse of narrative time, in order to build up Dr Raman's character, his relationship with Gopal, and introducing the story problem. This is 'telling,' rather than 'showing.' The rising actions, will show the detail. How important is this technique to story-telling? All kinds of narratives?

      Furthermore, the conflict suggested here is between the doctor and Death itself. How do you respond to this?

  10. Mar 2017
    1. ‘Ah, tell me more.’‘A knife has passed through you once?’ said the astrologer.‘Good fellow!’ He bared his chest to show the scar. ‘What else?’‘And then you were pushed into a well nearby in the field. You were left for dead.’

      Narayan leaves details here and there, without explaining their significance. Earlier on, the narrator informs us that the Astrologer "caught a glimpse of the stranger's face", which makes him "uncomfortable". At which point of your reading did you notice its significance? Here, or elsewhere? What can you say about Narayan's story-telling?

  11. Jan 2017
    1. THE SNAKE-SONG

      In this story, identify the exposition, rising action, turning point and resolution.

      Once you have identified the plot structure, can you put it all into a statement about life that has relevance universally? This statement should be specific, but not so narrow that it is only about the text.

    1. Two households, both alike in dignity (In fair Verona, where we lay our scene), From ancient grudge break to new mutiny, Where civil blood makes civil hands unclean.

      The first quatrain establishes the exposition of the play's plot structure.

  12. Nov 2015
    1. This evidence supports the view of some narrative theorists that there is a universal story structure. These scholars claim every engaging story has this structure, called the dramatic arc. It starts with something new and surprising, and increases tension with difficulties that the characters must overcome, often because of some failure or crisis in their past, and then leads to a climax where the characters must look deep inside themselves to overcome the looming crisis, and once this transformation occurs, the story resolves itself. 
    2. I recall that Martin Seligman also mentions this buffering effect in a slightly more rich context, but the essential message is the same.