11 Matching Annotations
  1. Feb 2019
    1. being able to wear clothing that enabled better mobility. Walker chose to wear what was known as the "Bloomer costume" as a modified uniform all throughout the war. It was a dress-and-trouser combination that had gone out of favor long before the war began, but she didn't care -- she wore it anyway.

      From the time she was a girl she wore pants and she continued to do so even in the military.

    2. In 1863, her medical credentials were finally accepted, so she moved to Tennessee, where she was appointed as a War Department surgeon

      The phrasing of this appears to be somewhat biased. It sounds like her credentials weren't up to snuff or something but really, the military was low on surgeons at that time and simply didn't want a woman. https://hyp.is/vAWzXCtjEem5j1tLLCQ8dg/cfmedicine.nlm.nih.gov/physicians/biography_325.html

    3. Because of her credentials, she didn't want to be a nurse, either, so she chose to volunteer for the Union Army.

      This is some what conflicting information. According to https://hyp.is/vAWzXCtjEem5j1tLLCQ8dg/cfmedicine.nlm.nih.gov/physicians/biography_325.html she did work as a Nurse, she just wasn't paid.

    4. Walker went into private practice for a few years, but then the Civil War broke out in 1861. She wanted to join the Army as a surgeon but wasn't allowed because she was a woman.

      She was a surgeon in private practice but wanted to join the war effort.

    5. in 1855 graduated as a medical doctor from Syracuse Medical College

      She was the second women surgeon at that time.

    1. in 1863 she was briefly appointed surgeon in an Ohio Regiment.

      She finally was appointed a surgeon near the end of the war.

    2. Dr. Mary Walker was an outspoken advocate for women's rights, and the first woman ever awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor.

      She wore her medal everyday and also modified her uniform in the war to have pants. In 1917 they took all medals of honor away for anyone who hadn't been "in combat". She refused to give her medal up and wore it until the day she died. Jimmy Carter later reinstated her medal in 1977.

    3. At the outbreak of the Civil War, she volunteered in Washington to join the Union effort, and worked as a nurse in a temporary hospital set up in the capital.

      She worked as an unpaid nurse because she was not allowed to join as a surgeon in the US military.

  2. Dec 2018
    1. buried two husbands

      This is the first remarried woman in Austen's writing. While it was discussed in Persuasion, it was in much more generic terms, and mostly regarding men. This is an interesting dynamic.

  3. Aug 2018
    1. Women were afforded much the same rights as men in Egyptian society.

    2. At least 15 egyptian pharaohs were known to be women. This article from 2014 suggests there were at least 7. It's crazy how in just 3 years they discovered that there were more than twice as many. This really speaks to the cover up by the scientific community to exclude women from history.