48 Matching Annotations
  1. Jan 2019
  2. Oct 2018
  3. Sep 2018
    1. Stress voorkomen door de angstcultuur aan te pakken. Angstcultuur door niet hard genoeg werken waarbij de bazen de 'standaard'zetten.

  4. Jul 2018
    1. To that point, I've also basically not refollowed any news accounts or "official" corporate accounts. Anything I need to know about major headlines gets surfaced through other channels, or even just other parts of Twitter, so I don't need to see social media updates from media companies whose entire economic model is predicated on causing me enough stress to click through to their sites.

      Some good general advice...

  5. Apr 2018
  6. Jan 2018
    1. So she began to regard her practice in a whole new way. She started evaluating children not just for their medical histories, but also their social histories. And instead of treating only symptoms, she sought to help with the root causes of the stress that were making them sick.

      The physician is trying to find a solution to the problem that way it can be stopped and not cause further issues

    2. She found an answer in a decade-old study that showed a strong link between chronic disease and traumatic experiences during childhood — things such as physical abuse or neglect, or living with a family member addicted to drugs or alcohol. She knew the children she saw lived with high “doses” of adversity, she said, and it made sense: Trauma was affecting their developing brains and also their developing bodies.

      This goes to show that even 10 years years ago that family members being involved with drugs and alcohol can cause stress on young children.

    3. “They would have chronic abdominal pain, headaches, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, opposition defiant disorder,” she said. “It could be that all these different kids have all these diagnoses, or it could be that there is one thing at the root of this.”

      These are some of the sickness and illness that can be involved with child health.

    4. Traumatic experiences led people to engage in more risky behaviors, such as intravenous drug use and early sexual activity. But even people without a history of high-risk behaviors had poor health outcomes.

      As you can see, poor health outcomes allow people to have horrible behaviors such as drug use and risky sexual activity at very young ages.

  7. Nov 2017
    1. Modulating these many pathways requires alteration of expression of a diverse array of genes, which takes place via the coordinated action of various stress-responsive transcription factors as well as chromatin-associated factors. While there is some understanding regarding the role of transcription factors, enzymes catalyzing covalent histone modifications and chromatin remodeling complexes in responses to various abiotic stresses in plants (Sahoo et al., 2013; Kim et al., 2015), the role of histone chaperones in stress response remains enigmatic

      This is interesting!

  8. Jul 2017
    1. Brain cells bombarded by stress signals have little recovery time and eventually start to shrink and cut connections to other brain cells.  The network that coordinates our thoughts, emotions and reactions thus starts to rearrange.  Over time, entire regions of the brain can grow or shrink.  That may explain why studies have linked higher levels of stress hormones with lower memory, focus and problem-solving skills.

      This talks about how stress specifically affects your brain. Your brain is what helps your body function properly so if there is something wrong with it. The effects could be very damaging to you. This is important because not many people understand how bad stress can effect your mind and body.

    1. Studies have also illustrated the strong link between insomnia and chronic stress.8 According to APA's Stress in America survey, more than 40 percent of all adults say they lie awake at night because of stress. Experts recommend going to bed at a regular time each night, striving for at least seven to eight hours of sleep and eliminating distractions such as television and computers from the bedroom.

      A symptom of stress is insomnia. It causes you to lie awake. This could also cause further stress with not getting enough sleep and not having a lot of energy. This is important because it can just make thins worse for your health. This is something that I at times experience.

    1. Over the years, researchers have learned not only how and why these reactions occur, but have also gained insight into the long-term effects chronic stress has on physical and psychological health. Over time, repeated activation of the stress response takes a toll on the body. Research suggests that chronic stress contributes to high blood pressure, promotes the formation of artery-clogging deposits, and causes brain changes that may contribute to anxiety, depression, and addiction. More preliminary research suggests that chronic stress may also contribute to obesity, both through direct mechanisms (causing people to eat more) or indirectly (decreasing sleep and exercise).

      This paragraph is talking abut how after studying stress that it can cause some serious health issues in people who experience chronic stress. This is important because many people experience these issues and for some people they could be caused by stress.

  9. Mar 2017
    1. The teacher in front of me was also clearly in a hurry "Do you have many more copies to make? I have a class in five minutes?"

      teacher conflict teacher stress teacher panic

  10. Feb 2017
  11. Jan 2017
    1. Anderson's theory of Faulting explains some of the faults found in nature but fails to find all types of fault and fault system.

      Parabolic failure envelope again as it gets into negative stresses.

      At high stresses( opposite of tensile stresses) plastic deformation occurs at high normal stress, shear stress would be independent here. if the differential stress is known you can start to form a composite failure envelope in which the 5 fault types occur at different differential stresses

    2. The stresses build up around the discontinuity or hole and that can be concentrated on the edges is the shape has a an elliptical shape. The more elongated the crack to more stress is concentrated at the edges of crack. The total stress was the same but because of the discontinuity the bonds at the edges of the crack saw too much stress and with this the geologic stresses of 100 see total stresses of 1000 in those sports which would mean the paradox we had is essentially solved. stresses at the tips of cracks will continually keep multiply and continue cracking until... no more airplane wings. The concentration is caused by the loss of the stress the crack or hole could have handled if were whole. Nature keeps propagating the cracks so while t the hole may keep getting bigger the force the stresses likely will not get more intense.

      Wednesday we will se how this works with compression

    1. Normal Stress = Normal force / area Normal Force decreases from finite value to zero while area increases to infinite. Shear stress+ Shear Force/area Shear force increases from 0 to finite value while area increases faster to infinity.

    2. What is Stress? are force and stress the same? Not for us it's rather tricky to say they're the "same" like it can be said elsewhere. Stress = Force/ Area if either changes the overall stress changes ( area will change more often than force) like saran wrap it seems to stretch forever until you stab it with a sharp object this is because the area of force applied changes ( big to small). Normal stress is perpendicular to the plane in 2D planes and shear stress is acting along the 2D plane, parallel. These are sometimes called "tractions" this is matrix algebra stuff. The pole is the normal stress and one along the earth that cause earthquakes are the shear stress. The area of the plane is important.

  12. Jul 2016
    1. Smoking weed calms teens down so they can focus better.

      i also agree in this! some teens smoke weed to release stress. it helps calm teenagers down.

  13. Feb 2016
    1. WASHINGTON — While aspects of the U.S. economy have improved, money continues to be a top cause of stress for Americans, according to the new Stress in America™: Paying With Our Health survey released today by the American Psychological Association. According to the survey, parents, younger generations and those living in lower-income households report higher levels of stress than Americans overall, especially when it comes to stress about money.

      Money is one of the tops causes of stress for Americans, especially for adults and younger generations with lower-income. This would be interesting to research more into because I believe adults have more to stress about when it comes to money (taxes, necessities, etc.)

    1. Grades are important. There is a ton of pressure for students to get those good grades, whether it’s from your parents, siblings, friends, or even yourself.

      Maybe this is one area that could be changed to alleviate some of the stress. The whole approach to the assessment process should be re-examined (pardon the pun).

  14. Jan 2016
    1. This could be reading a book, free writing, or exercise.

      Any other suggestions for stress-relieving activities?

  15. Nov 2015
    1. narratingdifficulties, frustration, stresses in the simple writing expressive paradigm leads toincreased happiness, reduced stress, reduced visits to health centers, reduced depression,even sort of better profiles of your immune system as you're handling disease.
  16. Oct 2015
    1. the more grateful you are, the tendency is foryou to feel less anxious, less depressed. Bob Emmons really put it nicely, which isthe more you move to this grateful mindset, it'salmost physically impossible to be anxious or depressed.
    1. "self-compassion (unlike self-esteem) helps buffer against anxiety" when confronted with threats to one's self-image; it also found that increases in self-compassion are associated with increased feelings of social connectedness and decreased depression, among other indicators of psychological well-being.

      I wonder if the ability to laugh at oneself is subsumed by self-compassion; at least, they seem related.

    2. Participants’ self-compassion levels, but not their self-esteem levels, predicted how much anxiety they felt.
    3. I slowly came to realize that self-criticism—despite being socially sanctioned—was not at all helpful, and in fact only made things worse. I wasn’t making myself a better person by beating myself up all the time. Instead, I was causing myself to feel inadequate and insecure, then taking out my frustration on the people closest to me. More than that, I wasn’t owning up to many things because I was so afraid of the self-hate that would follow if I admitted the truth.
    1. And what they found was that the individuals who participated in the meditation programhad longer telomeres than the individuals who were in the control group after a three-monthexperience. This was first finding in that vein. Elissa Epel and her colleague did anotherresearch project where they looked at a mindfulness-based program for people with eating disorders andshowed that people who did the mindfulness had a 39% increase in telomerase activitywhich corresponds to lengthened telomeres and that this telomerase activity actuallypredicted benefits in other aspects of their treatment program having to do with the people’seating habits. So there’s this interesting effect that is being reiterated that mindfulnessactually seems to make people age more gracefully.
    1. Mindfulness. It’s a pretty straightforward word. It suggests that the mind is fully attending to what’s happening, to what you’re doing, to the space you’re moving through. That might seem trivial, except for the annoying fact that we so often veer from the matter at hand. Our mind takes flight, we lose touch with our body, and pretty soon we’re engrossed in obsessive thoughts about something that just happened or fretting about the future. And that makes us anxious.
    1. Hostility also has been found to be the part of type A behavior that seems to have the most pernicious health effects, such as a heightened risk of cardiovascular disease. Forsaking a grudge may also free a person from hostility and all its unhealthy consequences. It probably isn’t just hostility and stress that link unforgiveness and poor health. According to a review of the literature on forgiveness and health that my colleague Michael Scherer and I published, unforgiveness might compromise the immune system at many levels. For instance, our review suggests that unforgiveness might throw off the production of important hormones and even disrupt the way our cells fight off infections, bacteria, and other physical insults, such as mild periodontal disease.

      Type A should take magnesium.

    2. To ruminate on an old transgression is to practice unforgiveness. Sure enough, in Witvliet’s research, when people recalled a grudge, their physical arousal soared. Their blood pressure and heart rate increased, and they sweated more. Ruminating about their grudges was stressful, and subjects found the rumination unpleasant. It made them feel angry, sad, anxious, and less in control. Witvliet also asked her subjects to try to empathize with their offenders or imagine forgiving them. When they practiced forgiveness, their physical arousal coasted downward. They showed no more of a stress reaction than normal wakefulness produces.
  17. Sep 2015
    1. People expect that helping eight victims costs more than helping one, so imposing a donation request created an incentive to turn off compassion. The rest of the participants were not told they would have to help; by removing the financial incentive to turn off compassion, I hoped to reverse compassion collapse. And that’s exactly what I found. When people expected to help, they showed more compassion for one victim than for eight victims. But this reversed when people did not expect to have to help. By showing that the amount of compassion is dependent upon expected costs, the experiment revealed that we don’t face some natural limit to our compassion.

      I view this need of "mandatory help" or "expected help" as a potential source of stress.

    2. if we feel like helping is not possibleor we don’t have the capacity to do so, so in this research when we encounter a lot ofpeople whoneed assistance, we’re actually much less likely to help. And that tells us that sortof cultivatingfeelings of efficacy and in a way to feel empowered to help at the right level is reallyimportantin meeting these challenges to kindness.
    3. if theywere on time and feeling like they weren't rushed, over 60% of the time they attendedto thatperson in need; if they were just a minute or two late, that likelihood of helping droppedto10 percent - a six fold decrease in kindness just by feeling a little bit busy.

      busyness as a barrier to kindness

    1. In the case of compassion, when you’re able to manage your own distressor not relate to your empathic experience as personal distress but rather a caregivingurge, this isa benefit to your health and wellbeing, and your sense of happiness.
    2. being distressed by suffering is not the most happy-inducing way to respondtoother people’s suffering. Rather, the better approach is to feel, to allow your caregivingurge tocome online and drive your behaviors.
    1. The amazing thing here is that noticing your Stress Reaction is all you have to consciously do. The rest mostly takes care of itself. Once you notice it, you’ll automatically start to mitigate it. And you don’t necessarily have to stop the behavior completely. Some of your Stress Reaction may be helpful even if too much is hurtful. It’s useful in turbulent times to manage more closely, withdraw to reflect, and compete a little harder than usual. It helps keep you on track and focused. Just remember to pause. And notice.
    2. Another destructive Stress Reaction is withdrawal. We become uninvolved, aloof, occupied with other things. We hide in our offices. We avoid communicating.
    1. I knew if I took that pill I’d be much too stressed about the possible side effects to ever fall asleep. I realized this was no joke — it was a real ad. And I realized this is exactly how corporate trainings talk about stress at work.

      Reminds me of The I.T. Crowd - Do You Fell Stressed; I think there are similar gems throughout the episode.

    1. One of the greatest buffers against picking up others’ stress is stable and strong self-esteem. The higher your self-esteem, the more likely you will feel that you can deal with whatever situation you face. If you are finding yourself being impacted by others’ moods, stop and remind yourself how things are going well and that you can handle anything that comes your way. Exercise is one of the best ways to build self-esteem, because your brain records a victory every time you exercise, via endorphins.
    2. Instead of returning a harried coworkers’ stressed nonverbals with an equally stressed grimace of your own, return it with a smile or a nod of understanding. Suddenly you have the power. As suggested in the new book Broadcasting Happiness, you can create a “power lead” to short-circuit a negative encounter.
    3. if you create a positive mindset about stress and stop fighting it, you experience a 23% drop in the negative effects of stress. When we see stress as a threat, our bodies and minds miss out on the enhancing effects of stress. (Even at high levels, stress can create greater mental toughness, deeper relationships, heightened awareness, new perspectives, a sense of mastery, a greater appreciation for life, a heightened sense of meaning, and strengthened priorities.)  Instead of fighting and being frustrated at negative people around you, take it as an opportunity to feel compassion or a challenge to help that person become more positive. Our HBR article “Making Stress Work for You” includes more ideas on how to change your stress mindset to a more positive one.
    4. In our highly connected working world, we are hyper-exposed to other people. This means negative emotions and stress become even more contagious as we have high exposure to negative comments on news articles and social media; stressed body language of financial news shows; stressed out people on our subways and planes; and open office plans where you can see everyone’s nonverbals.
    5. New research shows that stress causes people to sweat special stress hormones, which are picked up by the olfactory senses of others. Your brain can even detect whether the “alarm pheromones” were released due to low stress or high stress. Negativity and stress can literally waft into your cubicle.
    6. secondhand stress is a result of our hardwired ability to perceive potential threats in our environment.
    7. Observing someone who is stressed — especially a coworker or family member — can have an immediate effect upon our own nervous systems. A separate group of researchers found that 26% of people showed elevated levels of cortisol just by observing someone who was stressed. Secondhand stress is much more contagious from a romantic partner (40%) than a stranger, but when observers watched a stressful event on video with strangers, 24% still showed a stress response. (This makes us question whether we, as happiness researchers, should watch Breaking Bad before going to sleep.)
  18. Jun 2015